Woodworking (rec.woodworking) Discussion forum covering all aspects of working with wood. All levels of expertise are encouraged to particiapte.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 07:55 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2018
Posts: 105
Default Phase converter


I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor. I'd like to
run this from my home which has 220v. Would I be able to run it
on a 20A (preferably) or 30A circuit?

Can you give me an example of a "phase converter" which would be
up to the task? I saw one for $89, but I couldn't tell whether
it would be up to the task or not. I imagine it might be wiser
to avoid 3-phase and keep looking, but I thought I would check
with the experts here first.

Thanks!
Bill

  #2   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 09:08 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: May 2016
Posts: 403
Default Phase converter

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 01:55:21 -0400, Bill wrote:


I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor. I'd like to
run this from my home which has 220v. Would I be able to run it
on a 20A (preferably) or 30A circuit?

Can you give me an example of a "phase converter" which would be
up to the task? I saw one for $89, but I couldn't tell whether
it would be up to the task or not. I imagine it might be wiser
to avoid 3-phase and keep looking, but I thought I would check
with the experts here first.

Thanks!
Bill


If it were me, and the jointers is really clean and knives in good
shape and everything looks right on the bed, etc. Then I'd check on a
single phase motor, for pricing. Check the frame size of the original
so you can get an equivalent 1ph motor and use that as a bargaining
chip. Very few people have 3 ph at home.
  #3   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 10:52 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2018
Posts: 105
Default Phase converter

OFWW wrote:
On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 01:55:21 -0400, Bill wrote:


I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor. I'd like to
run this from my home which has 220v. Would I be able to run it
on a 20A (preferably) or 30A circuit?

Can you give me an example of a "phase converter" which would be
up to the task? I saw one for $89, but I couldn't tell whether
it would be up to the task or not. I imagine it might be wiser
to avoid 3-phase and keep looking, but I thought I would check
with the experts here first.

Thanks!
Bill


If it were me, and the jointers is really clean and knives in good
shape and everything looks right on the bed, etc. Then I'd check on a
single phase motor, for pricing. Check the frame size of the original
so you can get an equivalent 1ph motor and use that as a bargaining
chip. Very few people have 3 ph at home.


I like your idea. Do you know if that transition require a new
switch assembly, or are these designed to be reconfigurable? If I
want to actually "touch and feel" the machine, I'm looking at an
80 or 90 mile drive (each way). Then I would have to pay someone
who is insured to pick it up on a "flat bed truck". I've started
investigating how to get that done. Thanks, Bill
  #4   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 02:45 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2017
Posts: 397
Default Phase converter

On 6/15/2018 3:52 AM, Bill wrote:
....

I like your idea. Do you know if that transition require a new switch
assembly, or are these designed to be reconfigurable? If I want to
actually "touch and feel" the machine, I'm looking at an 80 or 90 mile
drive (each way). Then I would have to pay someone who is insured to
pick it up on a "flat bed truck". I've started investigating how to get
that done.* Thanks, Bill


It'll have 3Ph mag starter; you can wire it to only use the two sides of
the single phase but you'll need to resize the heaters to match the
single phase current of your replacement motor.

I put in a 3PH converter to bring the PM 180 planer and a 5 HP DC but it
was more like 10X (not quite) the $89...it's rotary and capable of 10 HP
continuous, though, not just "phantom" third phase that is likely what
the $89 is from capacitors only

https://www.phoenixphaseconverters.com/Shop/rotary-phase-converters.html

As OFWW says, look at seeing if can find single-phase motor used; for
home use undoubtedly you can get by with less motor than 3 hp, too, and
never know the difference.

On a 3hp, you'll be talking FLA of 16-20 A; you'll almost certainly have
to have #10/30A circuit wiring for 240V operation; it'll be 30A at 120V
which also gets to be somewhat of pain for just home workshop.

--

  #5   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 03:25 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2014
Posts: 239
Default Phase converter

On Friday, June 15, 2018 at 12:55:25 AM UTC-5, Bill wrote:
I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor. I'd like to
run this from my home which has 220v. Would I be able to run it
on a 20A (preferably) or 30A circuit?

Can you give me an example of a "phase converter" which would be
up to the task? I saw one for $89, but I couldn't tell whether
it would be up to the task or not. I imagine it might be wiser
to avoid 3-phase and keep looking, but I thought I would check
with the experts here first.

Thanks!
Bill


Bill, I blew the inverter on my WoodFast lathe a about a year ago and went looking for a replacement. I finally settled on a direct replacement, via Ebay. But in the process, I noticed Grizzly has several and the price is not all that bad.

Just a thought.


  #6   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 03:26 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Mar 2014
Posts: 239
Default Phase converter

On Friday, June 15, 2018 at 12:55:25 AM UTC-5, Bill wrote:
I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor. I'd like to
run this from my home which has 220v. Would I be able to run it
on a 20A (preferably) or 30A circuit?

Can you give me an example of a "phase converter" which would be
up to the task? I saw one for $89, but I couldn't tell whether
it would be up to the task or not. I imagine it might be wiser
to avoid 3-phase and keep looking, but I thought I would check
with the experts here first.

Thanks!
Bill


As for the size, depends on the draw of your motor. Again, check Grizzly.
  #7   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 07:00 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2014
Posts: 2,143
Default Phase converter

On Fri, 15 Jun 2018 01:55:21 -0400
Bill wrote:

I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor. I'd like to


why such a big jointer

why a jointer at all really

what you making







  #8   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 07:37 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2017
Posts: 397
Default Phase converter

On 6/15/2018 7:45 AM, dpb wrote:
....

On a 3hp, you'll be talking FLA of 16-20 A; you'll almost certainly have
to have #10/30A circuit wiring for 240V operation; it'll be 30A at 120V
which also gets to be somewhat of pain for just home workshop.

....

BTW, if you do choose to go the converter route, remember the supply
wiring to the converter has to be sized for the current based on the
single phase supply...that has much to do with where you would want to
install it to keep that run short.

--

  #9   Report Post  
Old June 15th 18, 08:56 PM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 302
Default Phase converter

On 6/15/2018 1:55 AM, Bill wrote:

I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor.* I'd like to run this
from my home which has 220v. Would I be able to run it on a 20A
(preferably) or 30A circuit?

Can you give me an example of a "phase converter" which would be up to the
task?* I saw one for $89, but I couldn't tell whether it would be up to the
task or not.* I imagine it might be wiser to avoid 3-phase and keep
looking, but I thought I would check with the experts here first.

Thanks!
Bill


I've studiously avoided any 3-phase machines although I have 4 different
3-horsepower motors in the shop -- it always seemed to be too much effort.
But if you are really interested in a phase converter, I just saw a 7-1/2HP
rotary converter on ebay for $389. I'd really be dubious of a $89 unit's
abilities.

Not affiliated or anything...

https://www.ebay.com/itm/7-1-2-Hp-St...-/142825491921
  #10   Report Post  
Old June 16th 18, 02:25 AM posted to rec.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,403
Default Phase converter

On 6/14/2018 10:55 PM, Bill wrote:

I was looking at a jointer with a 3HP 3-phase motor.* I'd like to run
this from my home which has 220v. Would I be able to run it on a 20A
(preferably) or 30A circuit?

Can you give me an example of a "phase converter" which would be up to
the task?* I saw one for $89, but I couldn't tell whether it would be up
to the task or not.* I imagine it might be wiser to avoid 3-phase and
keep looking, but I thought I would check with the experts here first.

Thanks!
Bill



3hp on 220V is (ideally) only about 10 amps. The reality it may peak a
little higher under a hard startup or if you bog down the motor.

A "good" rotary phase converter is the way to go if you think you will
run much 3 phase stuff. I don't recall the derating, but its something
like 30-40%. ie: Get a 5HP rotary for a 3HP motor. If all you wil ever
run is a motor directly you can probably go with a cheaper static phase
converter. Just remember that the derating is higher. Its best to see
if the MFG says "This converter will run a X-HP motor."

The easiest way for me (and most expensive) is I have dedicated variable
frequency drives on each 3 phase motor in my shop. When used 1ph in and
3ph out they have a 30% derating as well, but they give me infinite
variable speed control. Most are on CNC machines where a 0-10VDC analog
power signal controls frequency and rpm. Others I just use the controls
on the VFD. With most half decent 3phase motors you can run from half
speed (frequency) to double speed without them tearing themselves apart.
If they are inverter rated they may handle more. If you have one of
those fancy new washing machines you probably have a high speed 3 phase
motor controlled by a VFD already. You just didn't know it.

Anyway, even with the parasitic losses it will probably run just fine on
a 20 amp 220V circuit. Should be absolutely no issue at all on 30 amp.

I think 1HP is roughly 750 watts. I always figure 800 and then add a
fudge factor on top of that for safety.

3 X 800 = 2400 watts.
2400 / 220= 10.9 amps.

You will have some loss from your phase converter, heat, wire, etc.
Still with nearly double the fudge factor...

Odds are your 220V is really closer to 230-235 anyway.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FS -- 1 to 3 HP phase-a-matic "static phase converter" Ignoramus25542 Metalworking 2 February 5th 10 02:42 AM
Rotary phase converter versus trying to run a VMC straight from single phase Jeffrey Lebowski[_2_] Metalworking 0 February 21st 08 07:44 AM
Rotary phase converter versus trying to run a VMC straight from single phase Wes[_2_] Metalworking 0 February 19th 08 07:31 PM
3 phase 200V, on (nominal 240) rotary phase converter willray Metalworking 6 December 28th 07 03:58 PM
VFD versus Phase Converter versus 3-phase power Jay Pique Woodworking 8 October 28th 05 01:36 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:11 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017