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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

I'm reading "Bill's Place" (Bill Pentz) and his writeups on what does or
doesn't constitute an effective dust collection system. He insists that
4" ducting is woefully inadequate for safe dust collection. He writes
that 6" is what is needed.

His writeup gets fairly technical and sounds very convincing. But of
course, using 6" ducting greatly increases the cost of the ducting for
my workshop.

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?

Jack

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Joseph Connors
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

I converted from 4" to 6" after reading Bill's site. The flow is much
better, though I will need to convert to a cyclone in the near future.

To me, cost is irrelevant. We spend $1000's of dollars on our tools to
make this dust, that if we don't collect right at the source as soon as
it is generated, will end up in our lungs causing us untold health
problems. I say, spend a $1000 or so, forgo the upgrade on that tablesaw
or jointer, and ensure that we can continue woodworking for years to
come. Anything else seems like false economy to me!



mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:
I'm reading "Bill's Place" (Bill Pentz) and his writeups on what does or
doesn't constitute an effective dust collection system. He insists that
4" ducting is woefully inadequate for safe dust collection. He writes
that 6" is what is needed.

His writeup gets fairly technical and sounds very convincing. But of
course, using 6" ducting greatly increases the cost of the ducting for
my workshop.

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?

Jack


--
Joseph Connors
The New Golden Rule:
Those with the gold, make the rules!
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Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting


"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote
in message

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?


I don't think it is inadequate, but 6" is definitely better. The longer the
runs, the difference becomes more pronounced.


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DonkeyHody
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

I've spent a lot of time at Bill's Place too. The only question in my
mind is whether the nexus between occasional exposure to wood dust and
lung problems has been adequately established by the medical community.
I'm not arguing against it, I'm just not yet fully convinced.

I haven't done any controlled experiments like he did, but as an
engineer, I find no fault with his statements about what is necessary
to capture that fine dust that causes so much concern. I totally agree
that it's easy enough to collect the chips that you'd be sweeping off
the floor, but it requires much more air flow AT THE TOOL to capture
all the micro-particles. To move that much air, you need big blowers
and big pipes.

DonkeyHody
"Every man is my superior in that I can learn from him." - Thomas
Carlyle

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Phisherman
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 20:07:12 -0700, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote:

I'm reading "Bill's Place" (Bill Pentz) and his writeups on what does or
doesn't constitute an effective dust collection system. He insists that
4" ducting is woefully inadequate for safe dust collection. He writes
that 6" is what is needed.

His writeup gets fairly technical and sounds very convincing. But of
course, using 6" ducting greatly increases the cost of the ducting for
my workshop.

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?

Jack



I agree that six inch piping is much better than 4, although a bit
less practical for a typical (home) workshop. Pi R squared shows 12
vs 27, meaning that the 6" pipe can move over twice the volume as the
4" pipe in any given time. Now whether the 4" piping is inadequate or
not depends on how quickly sawdust will be produced.


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leonard
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

You can always use 5in pipe too, cost less than 6 and more then 4 but gives
more flow than 4



Len
"


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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Good point. I'm not sure that 5" piping and connectors are easy to come
by in my are (Los Alamos, NM). All I've seen is the 4" and the 6". But
I'll check in Santa Fe. That might be a nice compromise.

Jack

leonard wrote:
You can always use 5in pipe too, cost less than 6 and more then 4 but gives
more flow than 4



Len
"



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mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

My workshop seems painfully small to accomodate a 6" ducting system. I
expect most of my work to be routing and scroll sawing and hence don't
think the dust problem will justify the expense of a 6" system.

Of course, it's dangerous to put a price on one's health. Lung problems
caused by inhalation of microfine particles is pretty nasty (so I've heard).

Jack

Phisherman wrote:

On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 20:07:12 -0700, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote:


I'm reading "Bill's Place" (Bill Pentz) and his writeups on what does or
doesn't constitute an effective dust collection system. He insists that
4" ducting is woefully inadequate for safe dust collection. He writes
that 6" is what is needed.

His writeup gets fairly technical and sounds very convincing. But of
course, using 6" ducting greatly increases the cost of the ducting for
my workshop.

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?

Jack




I agree that six inch piping is much better than 4, although a bit
less practical for a typical (home) workshop. Pi R squared shows 12
vs 27, meaning that the 6" pipe can move over twice the volume as the
4" pipe in any given time. Now whether the 4" piping is inadequate or
not depends on how quickly sawdust will be produced.


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Joseph Connors
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Some people have had allergic reactions to wood dust and no longer can
work wood. These reactions can come about after prolonged exposure, with
no obvious ill effects to breathing the dust, and all of a sudden they
either must wear a respirator or not work wood. If you have this genetic
trigger, it can happen right out of the blue with little or no warning.

4" pipe CAN work for some machines with a large enough blower. It
depends on a lot of factors. Its just for most machines and blowers, the
6" pipe is required.



mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:
My workshop seems painfully small to accomodate a 6" ducting system. I
expect most of my work to be routing and scroll sawing and hence don't
think the dust problem will justify the expense of a 6" system.

Of course, it's dangerous to put a price on one's health. Lung problems
caused by inhalation of microfine particles is pretty nasty (so I've
heard).

Jack

Phisherman wrote:

On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 20:07:12 -0700, "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net"
"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote:


I'm reading "Bill's Place" (Bill Pentz) and his writeups on what does
or doesn't constitute an effective dust collection system. He insists
that 4" ducting is woefully inadequate for safe dust collection. He
writes that 6" is what is needed.

His writeup gets fairly technical and sounds very convincing. But of
course, using 6" ducting greatly increases the cost of the ducting
for my workshop.

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that
4" ducting is inadequate?

Jack





I agree that six inch piping is much better than 4, although a bit
less practical for a typical (home) workshop. Pi R squared shows 12
vs 27, meaning that the 6" pipe can move over twice the volume as the
4" pipe in any given time. Now whether the 4" piping is inadequate or
not depends on how quickly sawdust will be produced.




--
Joseph Connors
The New Golden Rule:
Those with the gold, make the rules!
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Art Greenberg
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 20:07:12 -0700, mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:
I'm reading "Bill's Place" (Bill Pentz) and his writeups on what does or
doesn't constitute an effective dust collection system. He insists that
4" ducting is woefully inadequate for safe dust collection. He writes
that 6" is what is needed.

His writeup gets fairly technical and sounds very convincing. But of
course, using 6" ducting greatly increases the cost of the ducting for
my workshop.

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?


It depends. The article on Bill's site tries to explain why and when to choose
a particular size. You can't ignore the physics behind what's going on without
reducing efficiency.

Look at the velocity needed to keep the dust suspended in the airstream. If
you don't have that velocity, the dust will settle out in the pipe. Velocity
is a function of CFM and pipe cross-section. FOr a given CFM, making the pipe
larger (larger cross section) will result in lower velocity. At some point,
you end up with a situation where the dust never makes it to the blower.

In vertical runs, gravity is working to reduce velocity as well. So you might
need a smaller pipe in vertical runs to keep the dust moving.

Too small a pipe, on the other hand, introduces a lot of frictional loss, so
the velocity will drop. The result is the same; the dust does not move through
the system.

For a small shop, it is probably not necessary to go through a bunch of
precise computations. Rule of thumb ar a good thing. I used one in designing
my DC system, and its worked very well for me. I think I found this on Bill's
site, but I don't remember so well, and I'm not looking at that right now. But
it said that, for a 2HP/1200CFM blower, 6 inch pipe is about right for
horizontal runs, but a bit too big for vertical runs. So I used 6 inch pipe
everywhere, except for the drops to my machines, where I used 4 inch pipe. I
built my system using S&D PVC, and used 45 degree bends exclusively (2 in a
row where I needed a 90 degree bend) and 45 degree Ys for take-offs.

--
Art



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Bob G.
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 19:23:38 -0800, Joseph Connors
wrote:

I converted from 4" to 6" after reading Bill's site. The flow is much
better, though I will need to convert to a cyclone in the near future.

To me, cost is irrelevant. We spend $1000's of dollars on our tools to
make this dust, that if we don't collect right at the source as soon as
it is generated, will end up in our lungs causing us untold health
problems. I say, spend a $1000 or so, forgo the upgrade on that tablesaw
or jointer, and ensure that we can continue woodworking for years to
come. Anything else seems like false economy to me!

Well I tend to agree that 6 inches is much better (mine is 4)..BUT
honestly what did woodworkers like my father loose by spending years
in their shops without any DC's....? My Dad passed away in 2002 at
the age of 87.

I have had my DC system for at least 10 years most likely more BUT to
be truthful I never installed it for health reasons... NOPE..*I just
happen to like relaxing and working in a clean shop.. I retired
almost 8 years ago and have spent at least 3-4 hours in the shop every
day since ... a lot less then that when I was working naturally...

I'm sorry...but spending 1000's of dollars on DC systems for health
reasons to me is not really worth the effort BUT spending that same
amoput of money to increase your enjoyment of life (like a clean shop)
PLUS a more healthful envioroment IS WORTH IT

Will I change over to 6 in runs...??? Ya know I most likely will
BUT only because it would be an interesting project...

Bob G.
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James \Cubby\ Culbertson
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting


"mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" "mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net" wrote
in message ...
Good point. I'm not sure that 5" piping and connectors are easy to come by
in my are (Los Alamos, NM). All I've seen is the 4" and the 6". But I'll
check in Santa Fe. That might be a nice compromise.

5" is probably more difficult to come by in most places. I'm in ABQ and
while I haven't specifically looked for pipe for my DC yet, I tend to see
only 4" and 6". I'm sure 5" is available from the plumbing supply houses
but it probably costs a bit more. I should have said I'm looking at the
PVC S&D piping. I'm in the process of designing a new shop to build when I
get some time and money and plan to do 6" under the floor with a cyclone
(Bill's Airfoil design) but right now I'm working in my garage where I have
no room for a cyclone or piping. I'll keep an eye out here in town to see
if 5" is more prevalent than I remember and let ya know. I head up to
Angel Fire on a fairly regular basis and we could arrange to meet somewhere
if you wanted me to pick it up.
Cheers,
cc


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Joseph Connors
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Bob:

As far as your father is concerned, a number of factors are in play
here. Perhaps he did not a predisposition to an allergy or lung problem.
Lung problems run in my family. Another point is in the past there was a
lot less sanding done, especially by machine. They tended to plane and
scrape much more so the shop environment was healthier.

As far spending the money goes, everyone makes that decision for
themselves as to their priorities in life. Its a personal choice to
gamble that it won't happen to you.

Another factor, Bob, is the shop itself. If your shop is open to the
air, then air quality is less of a concern. These bags collectors with
small 4" pipe are dust pumps, pure and simple. When you watch them
inflate with sunlight in back of them, you can see the cloud of dust
produced.

As far as I'm concerned, you need a large blower with 6" pipe and very
good (.5 micron - certified) filtration.



Bob G. wrote:
On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 19:23:38 -0800, Joseph Connors
wrote:


I converted from 4" to 6" after reading Bill's site. The flow is much
better, though I will need to convert to a cyclone in the near future.

To me, cost is irrelevant. We spend $1000's of dollars on our tools to
make this dust, that if we don't collect right at the source as soon as
it is generated, will end up in our lungs causing us untold health
problems. I say, spend a $1000 or so, forgo the upgrade on that tablesaw
or jointer, and ensure that we can continue woodworking for years to
come. Anything else seems like false economy to me!


Well I tend to agree that 6 inches is much better (mine is 4)..BUT
honestly what did woodworkers like my father loose by spending years
in their shops without any DC's....? My Dad passed away in 2002 at
the age of 87.

I have had my DC system for at least 10 years most likely more BUT to
be truthful I never installed it for health reasons... NOPE..*I just
happen to like relaxing and working in a clean shop.. I retired
almost 8 years ago and have spent at least 3-4 hours in the shop every
day since ... a lot less then that when I was working naturally...

I'm sorry...but spending 1000's of dollars on DC systems for health
reasons to me is not really worth the effort BUT spending that same
amoput of money to increase your enjoyment of life (like a clean shop)
PLUS a more healthful envioroment IS WORTH IT

Will I change over to 6 in runs...??? Ya know I most likely will
BUT only because it would be an interesting project...

Bob G.


--
Joseph Connors
The New Golden Rule:
Those with the gold, make the rules!
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Scott Lurndal
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Joseph Connors writes:
Bob:


Another factor, Bob, is the shop itself. If your shop is open to the
air, then air quality is less of a concern. These bags collectors with
small 4" pipe are dust pumps, pure and simple. When you watch them
inflate with sunlight in back of them, you can see the cloud of dust
produced.

As far as I'm concerned, you need a large blower with 6" pipe and very
good (.5 micron - certified) filtration.



The size of the pipe is _completely_ orthogonal to the efficacy
of the collector bags. A given collector bag will produce the same
"cloud of dust" irrespective of the size of the ductwork.

So long as the chips and dust are being transported from the
machine to the collector, the size of pipe is far less important
than the quality and weave of the bag.

Typical garage shop, 4" is fine.

scott
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Scott Lurndal
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Joseph Connors writes:
Some people have had allergic reactions to wood dust and no longer can
work wood. These reactions can come about after prolonged exposure, with


And some people have allergic reactions to peanuts and can no longer
eat peanut butter. The vast majority of people who have and do work
with wood don't have allergic reactions. Don't blow the problem all
out of proportion.

no obvious ill effects to breathing the dust, and all of a sudden they
either must wear a respirator or not work wood. If you have this genetic
trigger, it can happen right out of the blue with little or no warning.


And whether or not you use dust collection won't prevent it, unless you
have _perfect_ dust collection, which is probably unachievable (no hand
sanding, let someone else empty the collector, vacuum the shop floor
ten times daily, etc.).


4" pipe CAN work for some machines with a large enough blower. It
depends on a lot of factors. Its just for most machines and blowers, the
6" pipe is required.


In an industrial setting, perhaps. For a home shop?

scott



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Joseph Connors
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting



Scott Lurndal wrote:
Joseph Connors writes:

Bob:



Another factor, Bob, is the shop itself. If your shop is open to the
air, then air quality is less of a concern. These bags collectors with
small 4" pipe are dust pumps, pure and simple. When you watch them
inflate with sunlight in back of them, you can see the cloud of dust
produced.

As far as I'm concerned, you need a large blower with 6" pipe and very
good (.5 micron - certified) filtration.




The size of the pipe is _completely_ orthogonal to the efficacy
of the collector bags. A given collector bag will produce the same
"cloud of dust" irrespective of the size of the ductwork.


I agree completely.

So long as the chips and dust are being transported from the
machine to the collector, the size of pipe is far less important
than the quality and weave of the bag.


You hit the nail on the head! "So long as the chips and dust are being
transported from the machine to the collector" .... thats the whole
thing ... 4" pipe, in most applications, cannot carry enough volume of
air to transport the FINEST dust from the machine to the collector.

The vast majority of bags don't begin to achieve the necessary
filtration level.





scott


--
Joseph Connors
The New Golden Rule:
Those with the gold, make the rules!
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Joseph Connors
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting



Scott Lurndal wrote:
Joseph Connors writes:

Some people have had allergic reactions to wood dust and no longer can
work wood. These reactions can come about after prolonged exposure, with



And some people have allergic reactions to peanuts and can no longer
eat peanut butter. The vast majority of people who have and do work
with wood don't have allergic reactions. Don't blow the problem all
out of proportion.


That is true as far domestic woods are concerned ... not true at all for
exotics. Allergic reactions can develop over time ... the more exposure,
the sooner it can happen. Also, wood dust is a know carcinogen.

But you are right in that most of the time allergic reactions are not
going to be the problem. Lung problems are the main issue and that takes
time and exposure.


no obvious ill effects to breathing the dust, and all of a sudden they
either must wear a respirator or not work wood. If you have this genetic
trigger, it can happen right out of the blue with little or no warning.



And whether or not you use dust collection won't prevent it, unless you
have _perfect_ dust collection, which is probably unachievable (no hand
sanding, let someone else empty the collector, vacuum the shop floor
ten times daily, etc.).

It most certainly will prevent it. You do not need PERFECT dust
collection, which I agree is probably unachievable in a practical sense,
just reducing the exposure will suffice. I'm not saying that one whiff
of wood dust and it off to the pulmonary care unit ... we're talking
reasonable precautions here.


4" pipe CAN work for some machines with a large enough blower. It
depends on a lot of factors. Its just for most machines and blowers, the
6" pipe is required.



In an industrial setting, perhaps. For a home shop?

scott

Where the shop is physically located is irelevent. The
pipe/blower/filtration combination is what matters.


--
Joseph Connors
The New Golden Rule:
Those with the gold, make the rules!
  #18   Report Post  
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David
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:

I'm reading "Bill's Place" (Bill Pentz) and his writeups on what does or
doesn't constitute an effective dust collection system. He insists that
4" ducting is woefully inadequate for safe dust collection. He writes
that 6" is what is needed.

His writeup gets fairly technical and sounds very convincing. But of
course, using 6" ducting greatly increases the cost of the ducting for
my workshop.

Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?

Jack

What about fine dust escaping the bags or filtration material? Seems
that a 20" hose wouldn't help that issue. There's gonna be SOME fine
material floating around. Wearing a mask is the prudent and least
expensive solution. I'm not about to over engineer some esoteric DC
system when I've next to no problem with my conventional and affordable
system using a 20' 4" hose and 1.5 HP motor equipped DC. It's "good
enough". Now someone with a HUGE shop would be wise to install some
gawd awful expensive cyclone system with automatic blast gates and the
whole nine yards and put the unit outside the shop in an enclosure.
There's a wide range of shop size and sophistication. there's hobby and
there's semi-pro, and pro, and production...

Dave
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Chris Friesen
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Joseph Connors wrote:

Scott Lurndal wrote:

Joseph Connors writes:


4" pipe CAN work for some machines with a large enough blower. It
depends on a lot of factors. Its just for most machines and blowers,
the 6" pipe is required.


In an industrial setting, perhaps. For a home shop?


Where the shop is physically located is irelevent. The
pipe/blower/filtration combination is what matters.


You may wish to also consider the *amount* of exposure. Most hobbyists
do not spend 7-8hrs a day in the shop. Many professionals could.

In a case like this, the hobbyist may realistically decide that a 4"
system is better than nothing, but that the 6" system isn't worth the
upgrade.

Personally, I do software for a living. I am *far* more picky about the
quality of my monitor/chair/desk than most people, because I spend so
much time there.

On the other hand, my current dust collection strategy is a shopvac and
a face mask because I might spend an hour a week actually making dust.

Chris
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Joseph Connors
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Chris:

I hear what you're saying. I understand though from Bill's site that
some studies have indicated that the typical hobbiest woodworker has
more exposure than large industrial settings because the size of the
particles involved are smaller in a hobby situation than in an
industrial one. With the large industrial settings the bag house is
located outside and therefore no threat to air quality at all, whereas
in a small shop the air is recirculated.



Chris Friesen wrote:
Joseph Connors wrote:

Scott Lurndal wrote:

Joseph Connors writes:



4" pipe CAN work for some machines with a large enough blower. It
depends on a lot of factors. Its just for most machines and blowers,
the 6" pipe is required.



In an industrial setting, perhaps. For a home shop?



Where the shop is physically located is irelevent. The
pipe/blower/filtration combination is what matters.



You may wish to also consider the *amount* of exposure. Most hobbyists
do not spend 7-8hrs a day in the shop. Many professionals could.

In a case like this, the hobbyist may realistically decide that a 4"
system is better than nothing, but that the 6" system isn't worth the
upgrade.

Personally, I do software for a living. I am *far* more picky about the
quality of my monitor/chair/desk than most people, because I spend so
much time there.

On the other hand, my current dust collection strategy is a shopvac and
a face mask because I might spend an hour a week actually making dust.

Chris


--
Joseph Connors
The New Golden Rule:
Those with the gold, make the rules!


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Brooks Moses
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Art Greenberg wrote:
On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 20:07:12 -0700, mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net wrote:
Are there other opinions on this or do people pretty much agree that 4"
ducting is inadequate?


It depends. The article on Bill's site tries to explain why and when to choose
a particular size. You can't ignore the physics behind what's going on without
reducing efficiency.

Look at the velocity needed to keep the dust suspended in the airstream. If
you don't have that velocity, the dust will settle out in the pipe. Velocity
is a function of CFM and pipe cross-section. FOr a given CFM, making the pipe
larger (larger cross section) will result in lower velocity. At some point,
you end up with a situation where the dust never makes it to the blower.


Yeah, I was about to point out: it's very possible to have pipes that
are too big for your blower!

If the blower is pulling the same volume of air, the airspeed in a 6"
pipe will be half that of the airspeed in a 4". If you don't have a big
enough blower, then that can be a problem.

- Brooks


--
The "bmoses-nospam" address is valid; no unmunging needed.
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Mike Marlow
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting


"Joseph Connors" wrote in message
...


Also, wood dust is a know carcinogen.


Sure - it you eat enough of it.



Where the shop is physically located is irelevent. The
pipe/blower/filtration combination is what matters.


It's not a matter of physical location, it's a matter of volume. Home shops
don't generate the volume of "carcinogens" that production shops do.

--

-Mike-



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B a r r y
 
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Scott Lurndal wrote:

orthogonal


Wow! G

Barry
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external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

There is much logical sounding information in this discussion thread that is unfortunately either partially or wholly wrong. Please take the time to at least read my blog if not my web pages for more information.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/woodwo...ing-73860-.htm

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external usenet poster
 
Posts: 931
Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

Bill Pentz wrote in
groupdirect.com:

There is much logical sounding information in this discussion thread
that is unfortunately either partially or wholly wrong. Please take
the time to at least read my blog if not my web pages for more
information.


What have you learned in the 15 years or so since that thread happened?

Is a big giant cyclone with hard to find (for me at least) 6" PVC pipe
still the awesomest way to go? Is a broom still the best way to remove
sawdust from the floor, especially when we can buy a Festool tool to do
that?

Puckdropper
(Questions 1 and 2 are serious.)


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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On Sat, 05 Jun 2021 09:49:19 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:

Bill Pentz wrote in
sgroupdirect.com:

There is much logical sounding information in this discussion thread
that is unfortunately either partially or wholly wrong. Please take
the time to at least read my blog if not my web pages for more
information.


What have you learned in the 15 years or so since that thread happened?

Is a big giant cyclone with hard to find (for me at least) 6" PVC pipe
still the awesomest way to go? Is a broom still the best way to remove
sawdust from the floor, especially when we can buy a Festool tool to do
that?

Puckdropper
(Questions 1 and 2 are serious.)


He's found out that trolling works. All of these posts from homoaners
club are from the same person.
  #27   Report Post  
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On Sat, 05 Jun 2021 09:49:19 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:

Bill Pentz wrote in
sgroupdirect.com:

There is much logical sounding information in this discussion thread
that is unfortunately either partially or wholly wrong. Please take
the time to at least read my blog if not my web pages for more
information.


What have you learned in the 15 years or so since that thread happened?

Is a big giant cyclone with hard to find (for me at least) 6" PVC pipe
still the awesomest way to go? Is a broom still the best way to remove
sawdust from the floor, especially when we can buy a Festool tool to do
that?

Puckdropper
(Questions 1 and 2 are serious.)

You need some SERIOUS CFM to maintain adequate velocity in a 6 inch
pipe tor effective dust (and even moreso - chip) extraction
  #29   Report Post  
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On Mon, 07 Jun 2021 05:26:25 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:

wrote in :

On Sat, 05 Jun 2021 09:49:19 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:

Bill Pentz wrote in
ewsgroupdirect.com:

There is much logical sounding information in this discussion thread
that is unfortunately either partially or wholly wrong. Please take
the time to at least read my blog if not my web pages for more
information.


What have you learned in the 15 years or so since that thread happened?

Is a big giant cyclone with hard to find (for me at least) 6" PVC pipe
still the awesomest way to go? Is a broom still the best way to remove
sawdust from the floor, especially when we can buy a Festool tool to do
that?

Puckdropper
(Questions 1 and 2 are serious.)


He's found out that trolling works. All of these posts from homoaners
club are from the same person.


Well the guy did post under the name of Bill Pentz... and referred people
to his blog without linking it. I bet he won't ever come back to check
for replies.

Bill Pentz was a woodworker who got hit with dust causing health problems
and advocates a big cyclone to collect as much fine dust as possible as
well as PPE. I have one but never got the pipe to hook it up. (Btw, I'm
shifting to more of a "driveway woodshop" style due to a move. Anyone
interested in a tested but never used Clearvue Cyclone?)


I followed Bill's advice--the most powerful tool in my shop is the
cyclone. In all honesty, for my use it's gross overkill--I suspect
one from Woodcraft would be perfectly adequate. One thing about the
big one though, it doesn't produce that "need hearing protection
scream" that some do--more of a low rumble.
  #30   Report Post  
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Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On 6/3/2021 4:01 PM, Bill Pentz wrote:
There is much logical sounding information in this discussion thread
that is unfortunately either partially or wholly wrong. Please take the
time to at least read my blog if not my web pages for more information.




If you want to share thoughts do it here. We likely will not go to
another place to satisfy click bait requests.


  #31   Report Post  
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Posts: 2,833
Default 4" vs 6" ducting for effective dust collecting

On Mon, 07 Jun 2021 05:26:25 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:

wrote in :

On Sat, 05 Jun 2021 09:49:19 GMT, Puckdropper
wrote:

Bill Pentz wrote in
ewsgroupdirect.com:

There is much logical sounding information in this discussion thread
that is unfortunately either partially or wholly wrong. Please take
the time to at least read my blog if not my web pages for more
information.


What have you learned in the 15 years or so since that thread happened?

Is a big giant cyclone with hard to find (for me at least) 6" PVC pipe
still the awesomest way to go? Is a broom still the best way to remove
sawdust from the floor, especially when we can buy a Festool tool to do
that?

Puckdropper
(Questions 1 and 2 are serious.)


He's found out that trolling works. All of these posts from homoaners
club are from the same person.


Well the guy did post under the name of Bill Pentz... and referred people
to his blog without linking it. I bet he won't ever come back to check
for replies.


Check the headers. The "Hermes 2.0" tag has shown up in every one of
the antediluvian posts Homemoaner Club articles. They're all trolling
from same person.

Bill Pentz was a woodworker who got hit with dust causing health problems
and advocates a big cyclone to collect as much fine dust as possible as
well as PPE. I have one but never got the pipe to hook it up. (Btw, I'm
shifting to more of a "driveway woodshop" style due to a move. Anyone
interested in a tested but never used Clearvue Cyclone?)


I'm going the other way. I'm working on the finance committed to
justify a HEPA dust collector.
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