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  #1   Report Post  
leonard
 
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Default dust collection ducting

Hi guys
I have done my googling and web research,gone to the library and looked in
the books and have read all the opinion on the type of ducting to use.And I
am befuddled. I have a grizzly 1 1/2 hp dust collector (110v) if any of you
are using this type of collector what type of ducting are you using? and how
many inlets are you able to use?


thanks Len


  #2   Report Post  
Gus
 
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leonard wrote:
Hi guys
I have done my googling and web research,gone to the library and

looked in
the books and have read all the opinion on the type of ducting to

use.And I
am befuddled. I have a grizzly 1 1/2 hp dust collector (110v) if any

of you
are using this type of collector what type of ducting are you using?

and how
many inlets are you able to use?


thanks Len


Like most other things, it depends a lot on what you want to do with
your system, how safe you want to be, and how much you want to spend.

Concerning duct materials, spiral metal duct seems to be the top of the
line solution. Penn State sells it, among others. Rather pricy, but
there you are. You can check it out at www.pennstateind.com. Many
people, myself included, use flexible plastic dust hose. This comes in
many different varieties, including self-grounding. In general, plastic
dust hose is more difficult to ground than metal. Why ground at all? To
prevent a possible dust explosion. Nasty business, that. Commercial
shops will almost always use metal ducting.

How many inlets can you have open? Again, what do you want to do? Will
you run several machines at once or only one at a time? How far is your
DC from your machines? Short answer - you can have as many inlets open
at a time as you want, but each additional opening will reduce the
overall performance of the system. (less suck).

If you have a small DC, you can roll it up next to whatever machine you
are using at the time, minmizing duct run, maximizing suck. If you want
to run several machines at once, that's a different story and will
probably call for a more permanent installation.

As for personal experience, I use translucent plastic 4" hose,
grounded, and I have 5 machine drops. I have blast gates on each branch
and at each machine. This system seems to work well for me. I like the
translucent hose because I can see if and where blockages occur. I'm
thinking of switching to spiral metal duct, though. I like the
durability of the metal duct.

A couple of hints. If you use the plastic blast gates, be aware that
dust can accumulate in the corners, preventing full closure of that
gates. This can be remedied easily by snipping off the bottom corners
of the blast gate housing.

Finally, I recommend you pick up one of the "Long Ranger" type DC
remotes.

Not a necessity, but real nice to have.

I hope at least some of this diatribe makes sense to you.
Good Luck,
Gus

  #3   Report Post  
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
 
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Default

leonard wrote:
Hi guys
I have done my googling and web research,gone to the library and looked in
the books and have read all the opinion on the type of ducting to use.And I
am befuddled. I have a grizzly 1 1/2 hp dust collector (110v) if any of you
are using this type of collector what type of ducting are you using? and how
many inlets are you able to use?



I have the same sized dust collector from Penn State and I've got my table saw
(high and low) hooked up to it, a RAS, a floor sweep plus another outlet to hook
up tools I use occasionally, such as the jointer or planer. My tubing is a
combination of 4" PVC and 4" corrugated hose along with various elbows, wyes,
and blast gates. Works really well.... BTW, get a remote control if you
haven't already.

I'd bought an air cleaner first and had I known then what I know now, I'd have
bought the DC and been done with it. As it is, I hardly ever turn on the air
cleaner.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

VE





  #4   Report Post  
LRod
 
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On 24 Jan 2005 10:33:57 -0800, "Gus" wrote:


...dust hose is more difficult to ground than metal. Why ground at all? To
prevent a possible dust explosion. Nasty business, that.


That was a really great post except for the above. Pure, utter
nonsense.

When you can produce evidence of a single home shop dust explosion in
a plastic pipe ducted system, I will gladly retract my statement.

I suggest you checl this link before repeating such blather:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml



- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
  #5   Report Post  
Steve Decker
 
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Default

LRod wrote:
On 24 Jan 2005 10:33:57 -0800, "Gus" wrote:



...dust hose is more difficult to ground than metal. Why ground at all? To
prevent a possible dust explosion. Nasty business, that.



That was a really great post except for the above. Pure, utter
nonsense.

When you can produce evidence of a single home shop dust explosion in
a plastic pipe ducted system, I will gladly retract my statement.

I suggest you checl this link before repeating such blather:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml



- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net



Better safe than sorry, old boy.

Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?

I realize the subject has been discussed here ad nauseum and I don't
intend to add to that.

If you don't want to ground then don't.



Lighten up


  #6   Report Post  
LRod
 
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Default

On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:59:46 -0500, Steve Decker
wrote:

LRod wrote:
On 24 Jan 2005 10:33:57 -0800, "Gus" wrote:



...dust hose is more difficult to ground than metal. Why ground at all? To
prevent a possible dust explosion. Nasty business, that.



That was a really great post except for the above. Pure, utter
nonsense.

When you can produce evidence of a single home shop dust explosion in
a plastic pipe ducted system, I will gladly retract my statement.

I suggest you checl this link before repeating such blather:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml


Better safe than sorry, old boy.


Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. In such a case, better safe than
sorry is just a pitiful justification for the ignorant to continue
their ignorance.

Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?


Because it's unnecessary and unproductive. Do you sprinkle cream of
tartar on your saw before you work? Why not? It's cheap and easy.

I realize the subject has been discussed here ad nauseum and I don't
intend to add to that.


Yet you did.

If you don't want to ground then don't.


That's fine. But people shouldn't be report as gospel a circumstance
when there's no data to support its existance.

Lighten up


I'll "lighten up" when ignorance on this subject is eradicated. Your
promotion of it necessitates rebuttal. When it's no longer necessary
there'll be no activity of mine up from which to lighten.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
  #7   Report Post  
 
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http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm

in a nutshell

use 6" ducting
use sewer and drain for solid runs - works good and is cheap
use 6" flex hose for very short runs

i'm using the advice there, making my own blast gates, and so far, i'm
very happy

i have the jet 1.5hp w/ canister



On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 11:02:35 -0500, "leonard"
wrote:

Hi guys
I have done my googling and web research,gone to the library and looked in
the books and have read all the opinion on the type of ducting to use.And I
am befuddled. I have a grizzly 1 1/2 hp dust collector (110v) if any of you
are using this type of collector what type of ducting are you using? and how
many inlets are you able to use?


thanks Len


  #8   Report Post  
patrick conroy
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"leonard" wrote in message
...


Hi guys
I have done my googling and web research,gone to the library and looked in
the books and have read all the opinion on the type of ducting to use.And

I
am befuddled. I have a grizzly 1 1/2 hp dust collector (110v) if any of

you
are using this type of collector what type of ducting are you using? and

how
many inlets are you able to use?


I have the 1HP Griz - the 8029. Just switched over to about 20' total of 4"
S&D PVC pipe. 20' run is with one 90* elbow. 4 "Wye's", 4 blast gates.
Small runs of 4" Flex hose to each machine. Only one gate open at a time.
Works great.


  #9   Report Post  
leonard
 
Posts: n/a
Default

thanks guys,
I have read the grounding post before.And have consulted my wife the (PHD
in electrical engineering) also about the grounding and she say not to.
What I'm trying to pick is the material to use as ducting, pcv, havc or
special made spiral duct, ect. I have Six machines to hook up and a floor
sweep with 1 1/2 hp dc(with a chip collector).

Len





with "leonard" wrote in message
...
Hi guys
I have done my googling and web research,gone to the library and looked in
the books and have read all the opinion on the type of ducting to use.And
I am befuddled. I have a grizzly 1 1/2 hp dust collector (110v) if any of
you are using this type of collector what type of ducting are you using?
and how many inlets are you able to use?


thanks Len



  #10   Report Post  
Steve Decker
 
Posts: n/a
Default

LRod wrote:
On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:59:46 -0500, Steve Decker
wrote:


LRod wrote:

On 24 Jan 2005 10:33:57 -0800, "Gus" wrote:




...dust hose is more difficult to ground than metal. Why ground at all? To
prevent a possible dust explosion. Nasty business, that.


That was a really great post except for the above. Pure, utter
nonsense.

When you can produce evidence of a single home shop dust explosion in
a plastic pipe ducted system, I will gladly retract my statement.

I suggest you checl this link before repeating such blather:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml



Better safe than sorry, old boy.



Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. In such a case, better safe than
sorry is just a pitiful justification for the ignorant to continue
their ignorance.


Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?



Because it's unnecessary and unproductive. Do you sprinkle cream of
tartar on your saw before you work? Why not? It's cheap and easy.


I realize the subject has been discussed here ad nauseum and I don't
intend to add to that.



Yet you did.


If you don't want to ground then don't.



That's fine. But people shouldn't be report as gospel a circumstance
when there's no data to support its existance.


Lighten up



I'll "lighten up" when ignorance on this subject is eradicated. Your
promotion of it necessitates rebuttal. When it's no longer necessary
there'll be no activity of mine up from which to lighten.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net



  #11   Report Post  
Steve Decker
 
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Default

LRod wrote:
On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:59:46 -0500, Steve Decker
wrote:


LRod wrote:

On 24 Jan 2005 10:33:57 -0800, "Gus" wrote:




...dust hose is more difficult to ground than metal. Why ground at all? To
prevent a possible dust explosion. Nasty business, that.


That was a really great post except for the above. Pure, utter
nonsense.

When you can produce evidence of a single home shop dust explosion in
a plastic pipe ducted system, I will gladly retract my statement.

I suggest you checl this link before repeating such blather:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml



Better safe than sorry, old boy.



Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. In such a case, better safe than
sorry is just a pitiful justification for the ignorant to continue
their ignorance.


Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?



Because it's unnecessary and unproductive. Do you sprinkle cream of
tartar on your saw before you work? Why not? It's cheap and easy.


I realize the subject has been discussed here ad nauseum and I don't
intend to add to that.



Yet you did.


If you don't want to ground then don't.



That's fine. But people shouldn't be report as gospel a circumstance
when there's no data to support its existance.


Lighten up



I'll "lighten up" when ignorance on this subject is eradicated. Your
promotion of it necessitates rebuttal. When it's no longer necessary
there'll be no activity of mine up from which to lighten.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net



Zero chance?

Obviously you are omniscient as well as a crank.

If you won't lighten up, then get bent.
  #12   Report Post  
Steve Decker
 
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Default

Steve Decker wrote:
LRod wrote:

On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:59:46 -0500, Steve Decker
wrote:


LRod wrote:

On 24 Jan 2005 10:33:57 -0800, "Gus" wrote:




...dust hose is more difficult to ground than metal. Why ground at
all? To
prevent a possible dust explosion. Nasty business, that.



That was a really great post except for the above. Pure, utter
nonsense.

When you can produce evidence of a single home shop dust explosion in
a plastic pipe ducted system, I will gladly retract my statement.

I suggest you checl this link before repeating such blather:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml




Better safe than sorry, old boy.




Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. In such a case, better safe than
sorry is just a pitiful justification for the ignorant to continue
their ignorance.


Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?




Because it's unnecessary and unproductive. Do you sprinkle cream of
tartar on your saw before you work? Why not? It's cheap and easy.


I realize the subject has been discussed here ad nauseum and I don't
intend to add to that.




Yet you did.


If you don't want to ground then don't.




That's fine. But people shouldn't be report as gospel a circumstance
when there's no data to support its existance.


Lighten up




I'll "lighten up" when ignorance on this subject is eradicated. Your
promotion of it necessitates rebuttal. When it's no longer necessary
there'll be no activity of mine up from which to lighten.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net




Zero chance?

Obviously you are omniscient as well as a crank.

If you won't lighten up, then get bent.


Sorry about the double posting.

I slipped on the Cream of Tartar.

S
  #13   Report Post  
Larry Jaques
 
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Default

On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 16:59:46 -0500, the inscrutable Steve Decker
spake:

LRod wrote:
I suggest you checl this link before repeating such blather:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml


Better safe than sorry, old boy.

Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?


Cosmic shielding is cheap and easy, so why not?
http://zapatopi.net/afdb/links.html

JUST DO IT!


I realize the subject has been discussed here ad nauseum and I don't
intend to add to that.

If you don't want to ground then don't.


I didn't and won't.


--

People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but
most of the time they'll pick themselves up and carry on.
--anon

  #14   Report Post  
Patriarch
 
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"leonard" wrote in
:

thanks guys,
I have read the grounding post before.And have consulted my wife the
(PHD in electrical engineering) also about the grounding and she say
not to. What I'm trying to pick is the material to use as ducting,
pcv, havc or special made spiral duct, ect. I have Six machines to
hook up and a floor sweep with 1 1/2 hp dc(with a chip collector).


And did your PhD wife comment on the pvc grounding technique in the
archives? ;-)

Whatever you plan to do for ducting, figure a chip seperator into your
plans. A barrel, some S&D fittings, and a chunk of plywood for a lid, and
cleaning the system gets so much easier.

I used 4" S&D, with my 1.5hp Delta, because I could get it from the local
hardware store. My hand tools make the biggest mess in the shop now.

Patriarch

  #15   Report Post  
LRod
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:35:33 -0500, Steve Decker
wrote:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml

Zero chance?


Laws of physics. Fairly immutable. Read the article. The author was
unable to replicate an explosion with any kind of air/dust/spark
combination in common PVC pipe. So if you can't do it when you're
trying, how is there any chance to do it accidently? Zero chance.

Obviously you are omniscient as well as a crank.


Obviously. I repeat my challenge: when you can produce evidence of a
single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe ducted system, I
will gladly retract my statement.

In the meantime, maybe the tin foil hat will help.

- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net


  #16   Report Post  
LRod
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:22:05 -0500, "leonard"
wrote:

thanks guys,
I have read the grounding post before.And have consulted my wife the (PHD
in electrical engineering) also about the grounding and she say not to.
What I'm trying to pick is the material to use as ducting, pcv, havc or
special made spiral duct, ect. I have Six machines to hook up and a floor
sweep with 1 1/2 hp dc(with a chip collector).


Take a look at http://www.ShopTours.org Look specifically for Terry
Hatfield's shop. Look at the gorgeous job he did piping with 6" PVC.
For a while he was marketing a cyclone system based on Bill Pentz'
data. For an email addy (I'm sure he'll be happy to answer some
questions) go to http://www.woodcentral.com and look for one of his
posts. He usually has his email addy in them.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
  #17   Report Post  
Steve Decker
 
Posts: n/a
Default

LRod wrote:
On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 19:35:33 -0500, Steve Decker
wrote:

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_221.shtml


Zero chance?



Laws of physics. Fairly immutable. Read the article. The author was
unable to replicate an explosion with any kind of air/dust/spark
combination in common PVC pipe. So if you can't do it when you're
trying, how is there any chance to do it accidently? Zero chance.


Obviously you are omniscient as well as a crank.



Obviously. I repeat my challenge: when you can produce evidence of a
single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe ducted system, I
will gladly retract my statement.

In the meantime, maybe the tin foil hat will help.

- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net


You, sir, are a Grade-A jerkweed.

Congratulations.
  #18   Report Post  
B a r r y
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Steve Decker wrote:

Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?



Internal grounds can cause clogs.

I grounded, clogged, removed the grounds, much better!

Barry
  #19   Report Post  
LRod
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 06:22:36 -0500, Steve Decker
wrote:

You, sir, are a Grade-A jerkweed.


I'm not the one perpetuating the dust-explosion-in-a-home-shop-system
myth. You're going to have to look elsewhere to apply that apellation,
I fear. Start real close.

Congratulations.


Not at all. The congratulations go to the person who changed the
discussion from an exposition of facts to one of ad hominem attacks.
Again, look real close.

You're obviously one of those "last word" guys, so I'll let you have
it. My work here is concluded.

- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
  #20   Report Post  
Phisherman
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 12:40:14 GMT, B a r r y
wrote:

Steve Decker wrote:

Grounding is cheap and easy so why not?



Internal grounds can cause clogs.

I grounded, clogged, removed the grounds, much better!

Barry


So right! Chips and sawdust are notorious for catching on anything.
That's why I wondered about some kind of conductive paint that can be
used inside PVC to keep the inside smooth. I recall the military had
conductive paint used for aircraft, not sure if anything like that is
available tot he public.


  #21   Report Post  
Gus
 
Posts: n/a
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When someone says "zero chance", that's an exposition of opinion, or
hope, not facts.

  #22   Report Post  
LRod
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 25 Jan 2005 06:01:49 -0800, "Gus" wrote:

When someone says "zero chance", that's an exposition of opinion, or
hope, not facts.


What are the chances of that bucket of water sitting in the garage
bursting into flames?

Zero.

Not hope.

Not opinion.

Fact.

There is no mechanism known to man or supportable by any area of
science that can give one scintilla of credence to the possibility of
that bucket of water bursting into flames.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
  #23   Report Post  
Gus
 
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Well, since I can't have a battle of wits with an unarmed man, I'll
sign off.

Gus

  #24   Report Post  
Duane Bozarth
 
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LRod wrote:
....
Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. ...


Well, the conclusion of the article is to quote..

"...home shop DC explosions are somewhere between extraordinarily rare
and nonexistent."

That is not precisely zero...

While rare, railing at such extremes is just not warranted...
  #25   Report Post  
LRod
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 09:23:12 -0600, Duane Bozarth
wrote:

LRod wrote:
...
Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. ...


Well, the conclusion of the article is to quote..

"...home shop DC explosions are somewhere between extraordinarily rare
and nonexistent."

That is not precisely zero...

While rare, railing at such extremes is just not warranted...


Oh, WELL. I stand corrected.

Given, however, that my point was that it was fruitless to expend
resources in pursuit of "preventing" an occurance that is "somewhere
between extraordinarily rare and nonexistent," it seems I've been
vindicated.

Picking fly **** out of pepper over whether it's actually zero or just
really, really close to it is to obscure the bigger truth.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net


  #26   Report Post  
Duane Bozarth
 
Posts: n/a
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LRod wrote:
....
Given, however, that my point was that it was fruitless to expend
resources in pursuit of "preventing" an occurance that is "somewhere
between extraordinarily rare and nonexistent," it seems I've been
vindicated.

....

That could have been done in a much less combative way and in all
likelihood been more effectively received...
  #27   Report Post  
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"LRod" wrote in message

Well, the conclusion of the article is to quote..

"...home shop DC explosions are somewhere between extraordinarily rare
and nonexistent."

That is not precisely zero...

While rare, railing at such extremes is just not warranted...


Oh, WELL. I stand corrected.

Given, however, that my point was that it was fruitless to expend
resources in pursuit of "preventing" an occurance that is "somewhere
between extraordinarily rare and nonexistent," it seems I've been
vindicated.


Instead of arguing over this stuff, do what I do. before cutting or planing
any wood, I spray it with Static Guard. So far I've never had an explosion.


  #28   Report Post  
B a r r y
 
Posts: n/a
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:


Instead of arguing over this stuff, do what I do. before cutting or planing
any wood, I spray it with Static Guard. So far I've never had an explosion.


Ed always has a common sense, Yankee way of solving problems.

I'm suprised Ralph Engerman hasn't weighed in on the static issue.

Barry
  #29   Report Post  
Homer
 
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Default

LRod wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 09:23:12 -0600, Duane Bozarth
wrote:


LRod wrote:
...

Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. ...


Well, the conclusion of the article is to quote..

"...home shop DC explosions are somewhere between extraordinarily rare
and nonexistent."

That is not precisely zero...

While rare, railing at such extremes is just not warranted...



Oh, WELL. I stand corrected.

Given, however, that my point was that it was fruitless to expend
resources in pursuit of "preventing" an occurance that is "somewhere
between extraordinarily rare and nonexistent," it seems I've been
vindicated.

Picking fly **** out of pepper over whether it's actually zero or just
really, really close to it is to obscure the bigger truth.



Not really.

Making statements like "zero chance" obscures truth very nicely.

That, and your "bucket of water" example was truly laughable.

Homer
  #30   Report Post  
Robatoy
 
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In article ,
Phisherman wrote:

I recall the military had
conductive paint used for aircraft, not sure if anything like that is
available tot he public.


There certainly is. Electronic stores..(the BIG ones) often carry a
spray which was developed to create a ground plane on the back of CRT's
aka repairing TV tubes.
I do not know, however, how well it would stand up to particulate matter
flying by at the speed of sound ( well.. ahem..it COULD maybe go that
fast...maybe not THAT fast...)
If somebody just feels they HAVE to ground the frickin' thing..what
about self adhesive aluminum tape, huh? Huh? on the OUTSIDE of the PVC?
I see no reason to eliminate static charge build-up on the inside only.
I have a plastic ShopVac that builds up enough static to suck the hair
off my head on a dry day like today....I mean, the frickin' thing
levitates and sticks to the wall like balloon!!! The air flow on the
inside, builds up the static on the outside of the container.

Or... take a trip to:

http://www.welbecksawmill.com/Dustcollectors.htm

On your way by, stop in and have a coffee.

0?0

Rob

"Et tu, Spongebob?"


  #31   Report Post  
TBone
 
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"Homer" wrote in message
...
LRod wrote:
On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 09:23:12 -0600, Duane Bozarth
wrote:


LRod wrote:
...

Sorry how? "Better-safe-than-sorry" is only reasonable advice when
there is a possibility, even remote possibility of an event occuring.
In the cas of a single home shop dust explosion in a plastic pipe
ducted system there is ZERO chance. ...

Well, the conclusion of the article is to quote..

"...home shop DC explosions are somewhere between extraordinarily rare
and nonexistent."

That is not precisely zero...

While rare, railing at such extremes is just not warranted...



Oh, WELL. I stand corrected.

Given, however, that my point was that it was fruitless to expend
resources in pursuit of "preventing" an occurance that is "somewhere
between extraordinarily rare and nonexistent," it seems I've been
vindicated.

Picking fly **** out of pepper over whether it's actually zero or just
really, really close to it is to obscure the bigger truth.



Not really.

Making statements like "zero chance" obscures truth very nicely.

That, and your "bucket of water" example was truly laughable.



Was it, or did you just not understand it? Please give the exact percentage
chance for the said bucket of water bursting into flames.

--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


  #32   Report Post  
TBone
 
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When I bought into this stuff, I used aluminum tape on the insides of the
PVC pipes (2 strips on opposite sides) to prevent clogs and wrapped the
outside with copper wire. It appeared to work since I never got zapped
touching it (the pipe) but I believe it did little to prevent a fire since
data clearly shows it to be just about impossible for it to happen anyway.

--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


"Robatoy" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Phisherman wrote:

I recall the military had
conductive paint used for aircraft, not sure if anything like that is
available tot he public.


There certainly is. Electronic stores..(the BIG ones) often carry a
spray which was developed to create a ground plane on the back of CRT's
aka repairing TV tubes.
I do not know, however, how well it would stand up to particulate matter
flying by at the speed of sound ( well.. ahem..it COULD maybe go that
fast...maybe not THAT fast...)
If somebody just feels they HAVE to ground the frickin' thing..what
about self adhesive aluminum tape, huh? Huh? on the OUTSIDE of the PVC?
I see no reason to eliminate static charge build-up on the inside only.
I have a plastic ShopVac that builds up enough static to suck the hair
off my head on a dry day like today....I mean, the frickin' thing
levitates and sticks to the wall like balloon!!! The air flow on the
inside, builds up the static on the outside of the container.

Or... take a trip to:

http://www.welbecksawmill.com/Dustcollectors.htm

On your way by, stop in and have a coffee.

0?0

Rob

"Et tu, Spongebob?"



  #33   Report Post  
TBone
 
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"leonard" wrote in message
...
thanks guys,
I have read the grounding post before.And have consulted my wife the (PHD
in electrical engineering) also about the grounding and she say not to.
What I'm trying to pick is the material to use as ducting, pcv, havc or
special made spiral duct, ect. I have Six machines to hook up and a floor
sweep with 1 1/2 hp dc(with a chip collector).

Len



The problem with steel ducting is the cost of the fittings. They are a
friggen rip-off and one 'Y' connector can add up to the total cost of a
complete 4" PVC system. PVC works fine, is easy to use, strong, and is very
cost effective.

--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


  #34   Report Post  
LRod
 
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 16:49:26 GMT, "TBone"
wrote:



That, and your "bucket of water" example was truly laughable.



Was it, or did you just not understand it? Please give the exact percentage
chance for the said bucket of water bursting into flames.


I'd settle for a reasonable estimate. I'd bet a large amount of money
the answer will have "zero" as part of it: "approaches zero," "nearly
zero," "greater than zero, but..." are probabilities that come
immediately to mind.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
  #35   Report Post  
 
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 16:54:19 GMT, "TBone"
wrote:

When I bought into this stuff, I used aluminum tape on the insides of the
PVC pipes (2 strips on opposite sides) to prevent clogs and wrapped the
outside with copper wire. It appeared to work since I never got zapped
touching it (the pipe) but I believe it did little to prevent a fire since
data clearly shows it to be just about impossible for it to happen anyway.



4" SD pipe comes in 20 ft lengths. how'd you get the tape in there?


  #36   Report Post  
 
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On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 17:37:15 +0000, LRod
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 16:49:26 GMT, "TBone"
wrote:



That, and your "bucket of water" example was truly laughable.



Was it, or did you just not understand it? Please give the exact percentage
chance for the said bucket of water bursting into flames.


I'd settle for a reasonable estimate. I'd bet a large amount of money
the answer will have "zero" as part of it: "approaches zero," "nearly
zero," "greater than zero, but..." are probabilities that come
immediately to mind.


- -
LRod



you could get that bucket of water to make quite a nice big 'ol
explosion- but you'll have to crack the oxygen from the hydrogen
first. if you can do that in your garage, then I'm really happy I
don't live next door to you.
  #37   Report Post  
TBone
 
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wrote in message
...
On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 17:37:15 +0000, LRod
wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 16:49:26 GMT, "TBone"
wrote:



That, and your "bucket of water" example was truly laughable.


Was it, or did you just not understand it? Please give the exact

percentage
chance for the said bucket of water bursting into flames.


I'd settle for a reasonable estimate. I'd bet a large amount of money
the answer will have "zero" as part of it: "approaches zero," "nearly
zero," "greater than zero, but..." are probabilities that come
immediately to mind.


- -
LRod



you could get that bucket of water to make quite a nice big 'ol
explosion- but you'll have to crack the oxygen from the hydrogen
first. if you can do that in your garage, then I'm really happy I
don't live next door to you.


Yea, but then it wouldn't be water anymore.


  #38   Report Post  
Gus
 
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THAT is an accurate way of expressing it. Finally.

  #39   Report Post  
Gus
 
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The point is, bonehead, that the "bucket of water" example has nothing
whatsoever to do with woodworking, dust collection, dust explosions, or
anything else even remotely relevant.

Obviously, I cannot state, with certainty, the chances of anything
bursting into flame. Nor can you. Conversely, you cannot state, with
certainty, that something will "never" burst into flame.
It's not a question of flammability but of precision in meaning.

  #40   Report Post  
LRod
 
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On 26 Jan 2005 11:02:38 -0800, "Gus" wrote:

The point is, bonehead, that the "bucket of water" example has nothing
whatsoever to do with woodworking, dust collection, dust explosions, or
anything else even remotely relevant.

Obviously, I cannot state, with certainty, the chances of anything
bursting into flame. Nor can you. Conversely, you cannot state, with
certainty, that something will "never" burst into flame.
It's not a question of flammability but of precision in meaning.


Apparently, bonehead, you think that the laws of physics are just
suggestions. There are all sorts of certainties. Water not bursting
into flame in your shop is one of them.

If you don't get the connection of that illustration to woodworking
and the myth of the exploding home shop dust collection system, then
you are apparently just skimming the posts to find something to argue
about.


- -
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite

Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999

http://www.woodbutcher.net
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