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  #1   Report Post  
ScRaPLeR
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

Reprinted Material. All credit to -Robert Witter
Oneida Air Systems Inc.


What do you guys think. I have one of these systems. Am I hurting
myself and my shop by running it.

Ovrhead Shop Air Cleaners Can Increase Airborne Health Hazards in the
Woodshop

The ubiquitous air cleaners that hang on shop ceilings don’t improve
shop air quality. A scientific look at how they work and the percent
of fine material actually filtered indicate that in the best case they
don’t improve shop air or in the worst-case scenario increase the fine
airborne particulate in suspension.

Recently a national wood working magazine published 3rd party filter
efficiency tests of these units using a 1-100 micron test material
dust. The results were misunderstood. Actually, the data presents a
strong argument as to the ineffectiveness of these units. ASHRAE and
other recognized tests use a test powder between 0.3 – 10 microns in
size. The ASHRAE test measures the efficiency of filter by measuring
and counting all the particles that migrate the filter. It is the 1-10
micron particle size range industrial hygienists consider the most
damaging to human health. This size has the ability to lodge into the
deepest recesses of the lung, and is very difficult for the body to
excrete. It is also the predominate size range floating for hours in
your shop air. The test results indicate that even the best machine
tested did not filter the finest and most lung damaging material. If a
one-micron particle is the size of a BB than a 100-micron is a bowling
ball. The best filtering machine tested allowed 0.1 grams out of 80
grams through the filter. This might sound good on the surface, but
assuming a fairly even size distribution of the test dust, no size
break down was given, the 0.1 grams represents the entire weight of
all of the 1- 15 micron dust in the sample. Actually, calculating by
average weights of the size distribution, it’s possible that none of
the material in the 1-15 micron range was filtered on the most
efficient unit tested. It is precisely this range that constitutes the
worst health hazard. A 100-micron particle, assuming stoke equivalent
or roughly spherical, is one million times heavier than a one-micron
particle, and has a settling velocity of about 10 inches a second,
about the same as a falling cotton ball. Large particles this size are
far too heavy to float up to the ceiling where the units are typically
positioned.

The second misconception in the same article is the idea that the
proper size air cleaner will filter all the air in your shop in 6
minutes. The example given: a 15 x 20 x 8 ft shop contains 2,400 cubic
feet of air, divide this by 6 to get the minimum CFM required, which
would be a 400 CFM air unit. Ventilation engineers use a factor for
incomplete mixing which in this case would be a factor of somewhere
between 7- 10. In other words, based on this formula the real length
of time to filter all the air in the shop would be between 42 to 60
minutes, and this is only valid if the offending external source of
dust emission is shut down. Even assuming an ideal 100% filtration the
removal process is much slower than the dust generation process.
Meanwhile, you are in the shop breathing contaminated air.
Commonly woodworker’s will comment,” when I look in the filter I see
trapped dust, isn’t it beneficial to collect at least some dust?” In
this case the answer is no. Not with the machines tested here. The
dust accumulated on the filter is only a fraction of the total dust
drawn into the unit. The remaining dust is passed through the filter
and exhausted. The circulating fan keeps this dust suspended and aloft
in the air you are breathing. The dust on that filter is evidence that
too much dust is in your shop air to begin with. Quoting American
Governmental Industrial Hygienists,” when toxic contaminants are
evolved in the workroom, recirculation must be avoided.” This is why
these units are not used in industry.

A properly designed dust collection system lowers airborne particulate
to safer levels no higher than 5mg/M3. It does this by entraining the
dust with air near the source of dust emission and then filtering the
air to near 100%. Air quality testing in industry is performed
routinely where workers wear dust monitors on their collar. It’s not
uncommon for well-designed dust collection systems to lower airborne
dust levels by 10 to 30 times over uncontrolled environments. Get the
facts and protect your health.

-Robert Witter
Oneida Air Systems Inc.


ScRaPleR
  #2   Report Post  
David
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

ScRaPLeR wrote:

Reprinted Material. All credit to -Robert Witter
Oneida Air Systems Inc.


What do you guys think. I have one of these systems. Am I hurting
myself and my shop by running it.

Ovrhead Shop Air Cleaners Can Increase Airborne Health Hazards in the
Woodshop

The ubiquitous air cleaners that hang on shop ceilings don’t improve
shop air quality. A scientific look at how they work and the percent
of fine material actually filtered indicate that in the best case they
don’t improve shop air or in the worst-case scenario increase the fine
airborne particulate in suspension.

Recently a national wood working magazine published 3rd party filter
efficiency tests of these units using a 1-100 micron test material
dust. The results were misunderstood. Actually, the data presents a
strong argument as to the ineffectiveness of these units. ASHRAE and
other recognized tests use a test powder between 0.3 – 10 microns in
size. The ASHRAE test measures the efficiency of filter by measuring
and counting all the particles that migrate the filter. It is the 1-10
micron particle size range industrial hygienists consider the most
damaging to human health. This size has the ability to lodge into the
deepest recesses of the lung, and is very difficult for the body to
excrete. It is also the predominate size range floating for hours in
your shop air. The test results indicate that even the best machine
tested did not filter the finest and most lung damaging material. If a
one-micron particle is the size of a BB than a 100-micron is a bowling
ball. The best filtering machine tested allowed 0.1 grams out of 80
grams through the filter. This might sound good on the surface, but
assuming a fairly even size distribution of the test dust, no size
break down was given, the 0.1 grams represents the entire weight of
all of the 1- 15 micron dust in the sample. Actually, calculating by
average weights of the size distribution, it’s possible that none of
the material in the 1-15 micron range was filtered on the most
efficient unit tested. It is precisely this range that constitutes the
worst health hazard. A 100-micron particle, assuming stoke equivalent
or roughly spherical, is one million times heavier than a one-micron
particle, and has a settling velocity of about 10 inches a second,
about the same as a falling cotton ball. Large particles this size are
far too heavy to float up to the ceiling where the units are typically
positioned.

The second misconception in the same article is the idea that the
proper size air cleaner will filter all the air in your shop in 6
minutes. The example given: a 15 x 20 x 8 ft shop contains 2,400 cubic
feet of air, divide this by 6 to get the minimum CFM required, which
would be a 400 CFM air unit. Ventilation engineers use a factor for
incomplete mixing which in this case would be a factor of somewhere
between 7- 10. In other words, based on this formula the real length
of time to filter all the air in the shop would be between 42 to 60
minutes, and this is only valid if the offending external source of
dust emission is shut down. Even assuming an ideal 100% filtration the
removal process is much slower than the dust generation process.
Meanwhile, you are in the shop breathing contaminated air.
Commonly woodworker’s will comment,” when I look in the filter I see
trapped dust, isn’t it beneficial to collect at least some dust?” In
this case the answer is no. Not with the machines tested here. The
dust accumulated on the filter is only a fraction of the total dust
drawn into the unit. The remaining dust is passed through the filter
and exhausted. The circulating fan keeps this dust suspended and aloft
in the air you are breathing. The dust on that filter is evidence that
too much dust is in your shop air to begin with. Quoting American
Governmental Industrial Hygienists,” when toxic contaminants are
evolved in the workroom, recirculation must be avoided.” This is why
these units are not used in industry.

A properly designed dust collection system lowers airborne particulate
to safer levels no higher than 5mg/M3. It does this by entraining the
dust with air near the source of dust emission and then filtering the
air to near 100%. Air quality testing in industry is performed
routinely where workers wear dust monitors on their collar. It’s not
uncommon for well-designed dust collection systems to lower airborne
dust levels by 10 to 30 times over uncontrolled environments. Get the
facts and protect your health.

-Robert Witter
Oneida Air Systems Inc.


ScRaPleR



I'm no scientist, but my common sense says the safest course of action
is to use the best dust collection method you can afford and implement,
and wear a suitable mask, and skip spending money on an air filter
unless it's just an additional measure of protection. It doesn't make
sense that dust created across the room from a small air filter is going
to make it's way into the filter any time soon. Small particulates will
make their way into your unprotected lungs just as readily as they will
to the air filter. bottom line: wear a mask as the last line of defense.

Dave

  #3   Report Post  
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

All the dust filters I've seen advertised list their capabilities with
multi-micron-size dust particles. Irrelevant according to USCG
research. (Think overhauling ship engineering spaces.) Okay, they
reduce explosion hazard.

Gore-Tex filter in Shop-Vac alleges capability of removing 99+% of .3
micron particles. Over the years, I've been impressed at how they trap
extremely fine dust, like wood ash and drywall dust.

J

  #4   Report Post  
Toller
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

As the article points out, the heavy stuff never makes it up to the air
cleaner.
Yet my filters get plenty dirty. They must be filtering something out, and
since only the light stuff goes up, it must be the light stuff! I am
satisfied.



  #5   Report Post  
David
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

Toller wrote:

As the article points out, the heavy stuff never makes it up to the air
cleaner.
Yet my filters get plenty dirty. They must be filtering something out, and
since only the light stuff goes up, it must be the light stuff! I am
satisfied.



Blow your nose after 8 hours in the shop if you don't wear a mask. Look
at all the gunk in your hanky and I don't mean snot.

Dave


  #6   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments


Toller wrote:
As the article points out, the heavy stuff never makes it up to the air
cleaner.
Yet my filters get plenty dirty. They must be filtering something out, and
since only the light stuff goes up, it must be the light stuff! I am
satisfied.


Your unit is about 7 to 10 feet above the ground and your nose is about
5 to 6 feet above the ground, so you get all dust in the nose first and
the unit get the rest, so wear a mask while sanding or sawing.
Maxen

  #7   Report Post  
RzB
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

But is it just while sanding and sawing?
Doesn't this stuff hang around in the
air long after you have finished the
offending operation...

Roy


  #8   Report Post  
David
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

RzB wrote:

But is it just while sanding and sawing?
Doesn't this stuff hang around in the
air long after you have finished the
offending operation...

Roy


yes it does!

dave
  #9   Report Post  
ScRaPLeR
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

On Mon, 14 Nov 2005 20:18:37 GMT, ScRaPLeR
wrote:

Reprinted Material. All credit to -Robert Witter
Oneida Air Systems Inc.


What do you guys think. I have one of these systems. Am I hurting
myself and my shop by running it.

Ovrhead Shop Air Cleaners Can Increase Airborne Health Hazards in the
Woodshop

The ubiquitous air cleaners that hang on shop ceilings don’t improve
shop air quality. A scientific look at how they work and the percent
of fine material actually filtered indicate that in the best case they
don’t improve shop air or in the worst-case scenario increase the fine
airborne particulate in suspension.

Recently a national wood working magazine published 3rd party filter
efficiency tests of these units using a 1-100 micron test material
dust. The results were misunderstood. Actually, the data presents a
strong argument as to the ineffectiveness of these units. ASHRAE and
other recognized tests use a test powder between 0.3 – 10 microns in
size. The ASHRAE test measures the efficiency of filter by measuring
and counting all the particles that migrate the filter. It is the 1-10
micron particle size range industrial hygienists consider the most
damaging to human health. This size has the ability to lodge into the
deepest recesses of the lung, and is very difficult for the body to
excrete. It is also the predominate size range floating for hours in
your shop air. The test results indicate that even the best machine
tested did not filter the finest and most lung damaging material. If a
one-micron particle is the size of a BB than a 100-micron is a bowling
ball. The best filtering machine tested allowed 0.1 grams out of 80
grams through the filter. This might sound good on the surface, but
assuming a fairly even size distribution of the test dust, no size
break down was given, the 0.1 grams represents the entire weight of
all of the 1- 15 micron dust in the sample. Actually, calculating by
average weights of the size distribution, it’s possible that none of
the material in the 1-15 micron range was filtered on the most
efficient unit tested. It is precisely this range that constitutes the
worst health hazard. A 100-micron particle, assuming stoke equivalent
or roughly spherical, is one million times heavier than a one-micron
particle, and has a settling velocity of about 10 inches a second,
about the same as a falling cotton ball. Large particles this size are
far too heavy to float up to the ceiling where the units are typically
positioned.

The second misconception in the same article is the idea that the
proper size air cleaner will filter all the air in your shop in 6
minutes. The example given: a 15 x 20 x 8 ft shop contains 2,400 cubic
feet of air, divide this by 6 to get the minimum CFM required, which
would be a 400 CFM air unit. Ventilation engineers use a factor for
incomplete mixing which in this case would be a factor of somewhere
between 7- 10. In other words, based on this formula the real length
of time to filter all the air in the shop would be between 42 to 60
minutes, and this is only valid if the offending external source of
dust emission is shut down. Even assuming an ideal 100% filtration the
removal process is much slower than the dust generation process.
Meanwhile, you are in the shop breathing contaminated air.
Commonly woodworker’s will comment,” when I look in the filter I see
trapped dust, isn’t it beneficial to collect at least some dust?” In
this case the answer is no. Not with the machines tested here. The
dust accumulated on the filter is only a fraction of the total dust
drawn into the unit. The remaining dust is passed through the filter
and exhausted. The circulating fan keeps this dust suspended and aloft
in the air you are breathing. The dust on that filter is evidence that
too much dust is in your shop air to begin with. Quoting American
Governmental Industrial Hygienists,” when toxic contaminants are
evolved in the workroom, recirculation must be avoided.” This is why
these units are not used in industry.

A properly designed dust collection system lowers airborne particulate
to safer levels no higher than 5mg/M3. It does this by entraining the
dust with air near the source of dust emission and then filtering the
air to near 100%. Air quality testing in industry is performed
routinely where workers wear dust monitors on their collar. It’s not
uncommon for well-designed dust collection systems to lower airborne
dust levels by 10 to 30 times over uncontrolled environments. Get the
facts and protect your health.

-Robert Witter
Oneida Air Systems Inc.


ScRaPleR



I wear a dust even with both my high effeciecy cyclone dust collector
and an ambient air filter but I feel that my tool and surfaces in the
shop benefit at least a little from the air filter. I also use three
phase filtering on the ambient air system. 1. a 3M type furnace
filter, the 2. 5-20 micron filter then 3. the Hepa sheet and all three
get dirty after about 12 hours of contineous use. So I guess what
still have me puzzled is the fact that I AM capturing a lot of dust to
get out of the shop and is this not a good thing in the long run?
  #10   Report Post  
Toller
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments


I wear a dust even with both my high effeciecy cyclone dust collector
and an ambient air filter but I feel that my tool and surfaces in the
shop benefit at least a little from the air filter. I also use three
phase filtering on the ambient air system. 1. a 3M type furnace
filter, the 2. 5-20 micron filter then 3. the Hepa sheet and all three
get dirty after about 12 hours of contineous use. So I guess what
still have me puzzled is the fact that I AM capturing a lot of dust to
get out of the shop and is this not a good thing in the long run?


I think they are just saying it gives a false sense of security; rather than
that it is doing harm.




  #11   Report Post  
Todd Fatheree
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments


"Toller" wrote in message
...

I wear a dust even with both my high effeciecy cyclone dust collector
and an ambient air filter but I feel that my tool and surfaces in the
shop benefit at least a little from the air filter. I also use three
phase filtering on the ambient air system. 1. a 3M type furnace
filter, the 2. 5-20 micron filter then 3. the Hepa sheet and all three
get dirty after about 12 hours of contineous use. So I guess what
still have me puzzled is the fact that I AM capturing a lot of dust to
get out of the shop and is this not a good thing in the long run?


I think they are just saying it gives a false sense of security; rather

than
that it is doing harm.


I'm not qualified to assess the technical merits, but what it says is that
you might be doing more harm by continuously circulating improperly-filtered
air and keeping it stirred up vs. letting it (eventually) settle to the
floor.

todd


  #12   Report Post  
Chris Friesen
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

Todd Fatheree wrote:

I'm not qualified to assess the technical merits, but what it says is that
you might be doing more harm by continuously circulating improperly-filtered
air and keeping it stirred up vs. letting it (eventually) settle to the
floor.


This is only a factor if it won't be stirred up anyways. I have a
poorly-insulated garage shop, and keeping it warm in -40 weather
circulates the air pretty well...

Chris
  #13   Report Post  
Toller
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments


"Todd Fatheree" wrote in message
...

"Toller" wrote in message
...

I wear a dust even with both my high effeciecy cyclone dust collector
and an ambient air filter but I feel that my tool and surfaces in the
shop benefit at least a little from the air filter. I also use three
phase filtering on the ambient air system. 1. a 3M type furnace
filter, the 2. 5-20 micron filter then 3. the Hepa sheet and all three
get dirty after about 12 hours of contineous use. So I guess what
still have me puzzled is the fact that I AM capturing a lot of dust to
get out of the shop and is this not a good thing in the long run?


I think they are just saying it gives a false sense of security; rather

than
that it is doing harm.


I'm not qualified to assess the technical merits, but what it says is that
you might be doing more harm by continuously circulating
improperly-filtered
air and keeping it stirred up vs. letting it (eventually) settle to the
floor.

I thought of that, but the submicron stuff could take days to settle out
anyhow, and then just get stirred up again.


  #14   Report Post  
Greg O
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

"David" wrote in message
. ..
Toller wrote:

As the article points out, the heavy stuff never makes it up to the air
cleaner.
Yet my filters get plenty dirty. They must be filtering something out,
and since only the light stuff goes up, it must be the light stuff! I am
satisfied.



Blow your nose after 8 hours in the shop if you don't wear a mask. Look
at all the gunk in your hanky and I don't mean snot.

Dave


With my HF dust collector running along with my home built dust filter, my
snot is nice and clean. Without, it comes out in chunks!
Good enough for me!
Greg


  #15   Report Post  
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments


"Greg O" wrote in message Blow your nose after 8
hours in the shop if you don't wear a mask. Look
at all the gunk in your hanky and I don't mean snot.

Dave


With my HF dust collector running along with my home built dust filter, my
snot is nice and clean. Without, it comes out in chunks!
Good enough for me!
Greg


I think the only way to resolve this is for everyone to post their snot
photos for comparison. The cleanest snot by a majority vote is the method
the wRec will endorse.




  #16   Report Post  
David
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

Greg O wrote:



With my HF dust collector running along with my home built dust filter, my
snot is nice and clean. Without, it comes out in chunks!
Good enough for me!
Greg


You must not be doing enough sanding, Greg. g

Dave
  #17   Report Post  
David
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

"Greg O" wrote in message Blow your nose after 8
hours in the shop if you don't wear a mask. Look

at all the gunk in your hanky and I don't mean snot.

Dave


With my HF dust collector running along with my home built dust filter, my
snot is nice and clean. Without, it comes out in chunks!
Good enough for me!
Greg



I think the only way to resolve this is for everyone to post their snot
photos for comparison. The cleanest snot by a majority vote is the method
the wRec will endorse.


LOL! sounds like a plan. You go first.

dave
  #18   Report Post  
Juergen Hannappel
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

David writes:

Greg O wrote:


With my HF dust collector running along with my home built dust
filter, my snot is nice and clean. Without, it comes out in chunks!
Good enough for me!
Greg

You must not be doing enough sanding, Greg. g


A very valid point, maybe: In my experience neander techniques like
planing, scraping produce do dust but shavings, only sawing makes dust
in my shop, but I have no idea about the particle size distribution...

--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
Physikalisches Institut der Uni Bonn Nussallee 12, D-53115 Bonn, Germany
CERN: Phone: +412276 76461 Fax: ..77930 Bat. 892-R-A13 CH-1211 Geneve 23
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mac davis
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 03:33:54 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:


"Greg O" wrote in message Blow your nose after 8
hours in the shop if you don't wear a mask. Look
at all the gunk in your hanky and I don't mean snot.

Dave


With my HF dust collector running along with my home built dust filter, my
snot is nice and clean. Without, it comes out in chunks!
Good enough for me!
Greg


I think the only way to resolve this is for everyone to post their snot
photos for comparison. The cleanest snot by a majority vote is the method
the wRec will endorse.


But then we need a judge (I'm thinking Ed) to go onsite with the finalist and
get current samples after witnessing dust being produced..

How else can we know that the snot samples were not a "before" when they were
alleged to be an "after"?


mac

Please remove splinters before emailing


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mac davis
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

On Tue, 15 Nov 2005 14:59:27 GMT, John Girouard wrote:

wrote:
Toller wrote:

As the article points out, the heavy stuff never makes it up to the air
cleaner.
Yet my filters get plenty dirty. They must be filtering something out, and
since only the light stuff goes up, it must be the light stuff! I am
satisfied.



Your unit is about 7 to 10 feet above the ground and your nose is about
5 to 6 feet above the ground, so you get all dust in the nose first and
the unit get the rest, so wear a mask while sanding or sawing.
Maxen


Umm... my 'unit' is more in the 2 to 3 foot off the ground range.

-John in NH


Doesn't that depend on angle and gravity, or something like that?



mac

Please remove splinters before emailing
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Posted to rec.woodworking
mac davis
 
Posts: n/a
Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

On Mon, 14 Nov 2005 23:24:33 GMT, "Toller" wrote:


I wear a dust even with both my high effeciecy cyclone dust collector
and an ambient air filter but I feel that my tool and surfaces in the
shop benefit at least a little from the air filter. I also use three
phase filtering on the ambient air system. 1. a 3M type furnace
filter, the 2. 5-20 micron filter then 3. the Hepa sheet and all three
get dirty after about 12 hours of contineous use. So I guess what
still have me puzzled is the fact that I AM capturing a lot of dust to
get out of the shop and is this not a good thing in the long run?


I think they are just saying it gives a false sense of security; rather than
that it is doing harm.

I understood it to "suggest" that it could be harmful because it catches small
stuff and then recirculates it...

If that's true, I'm probably doing it right since my filter (box fan with
pleated filters) exhausts through the window??

Min reason for it anyway is to cut down on the dust on things in the shop and it
does that... really important when we move to Mexico, since the shop will be IN
the house..


mac

Please remove splinters before emailing
  #23   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Patrick Conroy
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

ScRaPLeR wrote in
:

What do you guys think. I have one of these systems. Am I hurting
myself and my shop by running it.


I read this some time ago and *still* bought an overhead air cleaner just
last week.

Common sense indicates:
a) Use a good collector to prevent as much dust as possible from becoming
airbone. This is everything from a decent DC/Cyclone to decent filters/bags
to extras like overhead blade guards. Do what you can to prevent your DC
system from being a source of dust getting pumped back into the air.
b) Use an appropriately sized air cleaner to pull some dust out of the air.
Exhaust appropriately if you're worried about recirculation.
c) Wear a respirator.
d) Wear a quality respirator
e) Wear a quality, properly fitted respirator
f) See (c) (d) and (e)
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Fly-by-Night CC
 
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Default Air Borne Dust Hazzard, for your consideration and comments

In article ,
Patrick Conroy wrote:

a) Use a good collector to prevent as much dust as possible from becoming
airbone. This is everything from a decent DC/Cyclone to decent filters/bags
to extras like overhead blade guards. Do what you can to prevent your DC
system from being a source of dust getting pumped back into the air.
b) Use an appropriately sized air cleaner to pull some dust out of the air.
Exhaust appropriately if you're worried about recirculation.


About a year ago I moved all my turning work to a small shop in my
finished basement. One of the prime concerns was of dust as the basement
is also the laundry and ironing area for my wife's work clothes as well
as a play area for our kid. Wood dust would not do.

I had a Jet 1100 DC with the canister filter which also made the trip to
the basement and then bought the JDS-750 air filtration unit. The DC is
in the corner of the 9'x12' room and the intake to the overhead JDS is
"aimed" at the DC's canister. As long as I'm vigilant with using the DC
when sanding and running the air filtration for up to an hour after I'm
finished I've seen no additional dust whatsoever.

The Jet DC seems to do a fine job of capturing most of the fine stuff
and the JDS seems to do a great job of catching what's left over or gets
blown out of the filter. The JDS uses 3 filters before the air is sent
back into the room and these guys are certainly not pristine any longer.

From my experience, it's been worth it and has got to be a healthier
environment - at the very least from a frying pan to the head
perspective.
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
__________

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the
Corporate States of America and to the
Republicans for which it stands, one nation,
under debt, easily divisible, with liberty
and justice for oil."
- Wiley Miller, Non Sequitur, 1/24/05
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