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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour


Don mentioned that his cheesecake is 5 hours on his feet. While it
may be a spectacular cake the way he makes it, neither of us can spend
5 hours on our feet in a day. This is easer and still better than 95%
of the commercial cheesecakes you'd find in a store or bakery.

When the kids were home we'd always make the larger version, now the
smaller one is fine. Yes, it uses commercial crust, not as good as
home made, but you can make your own.


Cheesecake


Ingredients:

2 10" Pie Crusts, rolled as one

FILLING

regular size large size

1 LB. Cream cheese, softened 2 LB

12 TBS sugar 24 TBS
2 TBS flour 4 TBS

4 eggs 8 eggs
juice of 1 lemon (3 TBS) 6 TBS
3 cups Milk 6 cups
2 tsp. Vanilla 4 tsp. vanilla
1 large Jar of Fruit (optional)
Instructions:

Prepare the crust and roll it out to fit 12" x 9" x 2" pan. Place the
crust into the pan.

Beat the filling ingredients together with an electric mixer or a
blender. Mixture will be thin.

If using canned cherries or crushed pineapples, place them on the
crust before adding the cream cheese filling. (Don Y reduces his
filling, probably a good idea)

Pour mixture on top of crust and bake in a 350 oven for 1 hour.

Remove from oven and wrap in dish towel and refrigerate till cool
about 3 hours.




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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/17/2016 3:16 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Don mentioned that his cheesecake is 5 hours on his feet. While it
may be a spectacular cake the way he makes it, neither of us can spend
5 hours on our feet in a day.


Yes. That's why I spread it over two days, presently. E.g., the pineapple
reduction can happen a day (or more?) ahead of the "assembly". The same is
true of making the crust. Refrigeration is a blessing! :

This is easer and still better than 95%
of the commercial cheesecakes you'd find in a store or bakery.

When the kids were home we'd always make the larger version, now the
smaller one is fine. Yes, it uses commercial crust, not as good as
home made, but you can make your own.


Well, that trims an hour...

Cheesecake

Ingredients:
2 10" Pie Crusts, rolled as one

FILLING
regular size large size

1 LB. Cream cheese, softened 2 LB
12 TBS sugar 24 TBS
2 TBS flour 4 TBS

4 eggs 8 eggs


Presumably large eggs?

juice of 1 lemon (3 TBS) 6 TBS
3 cups Milk 6 cups
2 tsp. Vanilla 4 tsp. vanilla
1 large Jar of Fruit (optional)
Instructions:

Prepare the crust and roll it out to fit 12" x 9" x 2" pan. Place the
crust into the pan.

Beat the filling ingredients together with an electric mixer or a
blender. Mixture will be thin.

If using canned cherries or crushed pineapples, place them on the
crust before adding the cream cheese filling. (Don Y reduces his
filling, probably a good idea)


No! The pineapple reduction is the most tedious part! It's an hour
and a half standing over the stove with your hand continuously stirring
a hot, sputtering mixture!

Cut this out -- plus the hour for the crust -- and I'd be down to 2.5 hours.
Of that, 1 is spent packaging it for transport; another spent baking it
(and cleanup).

Pour mixture on top of crust and bake in a 350 oven for 1 hour.

Remove from oven and wrap in dish towel and refrigerate till cool
about 3 hours.


I freeze, then slice and place in individual waxed paper "cups"
(so the individual pieces can be easily separated from each other),
then freeze (again) until hard, transfer to a foil covered piece of
cardboard and slide into a covered box (that I have previously rescued
or built) -- just to get it to whomever's home. Hence the added hour.

[If the cheesecake will be staying here, I leave the individually
"wrapped"/cupped pieces in Tupperware in the freezer. SWMBO extracts
them 2 at a time -- a second to defrost while she impatiently eats the
first -- and complains that I need to stop making it for her...]
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

Don mentioned that his cheesecake is 5 hours on his feet. While it
may be a spectacular cake the way he makes it, neither of us can spend
5 hours on our feet in a day. This is easer and still better than 95%
of the commercial cheesecakes you'd find in a store or bakery.


I prefer a plain New York style cheesecake (no fruit), but usually end up
topping it with cherry pie filling to satisfy my wife. Blueberry and
apple pie fillings work well too.

I've used this same recipe for years. I think it's the traditional recipe
from the Philadelphia cream cheese box.


Title: Tony's Cherry Cheesecake
Chapter: Watson's Favorite Desserts
Servings: 10

1 cup Graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup Margarine, melted

24 ounces Cream cheese, softened
3/4 cup Sugar
3 large eggs
1 teaspoon Vanilla

21 ounces Cherry pie filling (1 cn)


Combine crumbs and margarine; press onto bottom of 9-inch springform pan.
Bake at 325'F for 10 minutes. Combine cream cheese and sugar, mixing at
medium speed on electric mixer until well blended. Add eggs, one at a
time mixing well after each addition. Blend in vanilla; pour over crust.
Bake at 450'F for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 250'F, continue
baking 30 minutes or until set. Loosen cake from rim of pan; cool before
removing rim of pan. Chill. Top with pie filling just before serving.


-----

I've made a variety of chocolate, pumpkin, and other flavored cheesecakes
but still prefer a simple basic cheesecake.

Some of my family members make this stuff with whip cream and call it
cheesecake. PLEASE... That's just cool whip pudding.

Anthony Watson
www.watsondiy.com
www.mountainsoftware.com
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/17/2016 8:03 AM, HerHusband wrote:
Don mentioned that his cheesecake is 5 hours on his feet. While it
may be a spectacular cake the way he makes it, neither of us can spend
5 hours on our feet in a day. This is easer and still better than 95%
of the commercial cheesecakes you'd find in a store or bakery.


I prefer a plain New York style cheesecake (no fruit), but usually end up
topping it with cherry pie filling to satisfy my wife. Blueberry and
apple pie fillings work well too.


That's essentially just a block of cream cheese :

I "thin" the cream cheese with heavy cream, sour cream or milk
(depending on the Rx i am targeting). This makes for a "lighter"
product -- one that folks seem eager to go for seconds or thirds
(a NY-style cake seems to be a "self-limiting" proposition -- one
slice is usually enough).

[I made a cheesecake as a ThankYou for a neighbor one Saturday.
She got home (at noon) to find one small piece left for her.
And, in her NYC manner, griped to me about it! "Hey, it's
YOUR FAMILY that are the oinkers!!"]

I've made a variety of chocolate, pumpkin, and other flavored cheesecakes
but still prefer a simple basic cheesecake.


I'm not fond of cheese (unless melted on a pizza or grated over "red sauce".
Cream cheese is perhaps the most disgusting -- it just looks like a giant
block of slimey FAT! (I buy the 3 pound blocks from Costco)

Some of my family members make this stuff with whip cream and call it
cheesecake. PLEASE... That's just cool whip pudding.


I made some brownies for a neighbor. Daughter came walking out of the house
eating one: "Did you make these from scratch?" (is there any other way??)
"Wow! My mom has NEVER made them from scratch!" Her Mom didn't look too
pleased at that!
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

That's essentially just a block of cream cheese :

Hey, it's got sugar in it...

I "thin" the cream cheese with heavy cream, sour cream or milk
(depending on the Rx i am targeting). This makes for a "lighter"
product -- one that folks seem eager to go for seconds or thirds
(a NY-style cake seems to be a "self-limiting" proposition -- one
slice is usually enough).


One of the best cheesecakes I've ever eaten was a bourbon cheesecake at a
local restaurant. Rich and creamy, no cracks, not doughy but not some
wimpy fluffy cake either. I don't know what their secret was, but it was
amazing. Ironically we weren't impressed with the restaurant otherwise
and haven't been back since.

The WORST cheesecake was given to us as a gift. I don't know where they
bought it but it tasted like sawdust and flour. Absolutely disgusting. Of
course, we still ate it all.

I'm not fond of cheese (unless melted on a pizza or grated over "red
sauce". Cream cheese is perhaps the most disgusting -- it just looks
like a giant block of slimey FAT! (I buy the 3 pound blocks from
Costco)


I never liked cheese until I met my wife. Her family was very low income
and would get 5 pound blocks of cheese from the food banks. So they ate a
lot of cheese. When I met my wife she would cut some up into slices and
start chewing. I'm like "you are just going to EAT it"? Up till then I
had only had cheese IN things (pizza, grilled cheese sandwich, etc.).

These days we eat all things cheese, especially pepper jack, smoked
gouda, or any of the specialty cheeses. We enjoy seeking out unique
cheese and giving them a try. I still don't care for any of the "moldy"
cheeses like bleu cheese or roquefurt.

Asiago on bread or seafood pasta is amazing.

A typical Friday movie night almost always includes a glass of red wine,
cheese, and crackers.

I made some brownies for a neighbor. Daughter came walking out of the
house eating one: "Did you make these from scratch?" (is there any
other way??) "Wow! My mom has NEVER made them from scratch!" Her Mom
didn't look too pleased at that!


My sister-in-law is big on prepackaged foods. I can't stand the stuff.
Brownies, pasta sauces, etc. should ALWAYS be made from scratch!

Anthony Watson
www.watsondiy.com
www.mountainsoftware.com


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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/17/2016 6:59 PM, HerHusband wrote:


A typical Friday movie night almost always includes a glass of red wine,
cheese, and crackers.


Add some bread and you have dinner. When we go to Italy we usually eat
our big meal of the day at lunch while out, then go back to the villa
and have the cheese/bread/meat/wine.
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/17/2016 8:02 AM, Don Y wrote:


4 eggs 8 eggs


Presumably large eggs?


Yes.



juice of 1 lemon (3 TBS) 6 TBS
3 cups Milk 6 cups
2 tsp. Vanilla 4 tsp. vanilla
1 large Jar of Fruit (optional)
Instructions:



If using canned cherries or crushed pineapples, place them on the
crust before adding the cream cheese filling. (Don Y reduces his
filling, probably a good idea)


No! The pineapple reduction is the most tedious part! It's an hour
and a half standing over the stove with your hand continuously stirring
a hot, sputtering mixture!


Things done that way make for superior results though. I can't stand
that long anyway, but I may try it at least a partial reduction, next time.



I freeze, then slice and place in individual waxed paper "cups"
(so the individual pieces can be easily separated from each other),
then freeze (again) until hard, transfer to a foil covered piece of
cardboard and slide into a covered box (that I have previously rescued
or built) -- just to get it to whomever's home. Hence the added hour.


Never thought about freezing it. Making the large is only a few minutes
more than the small version and we'd have some a few weeks later.




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On 05/17/2016 04:59 PM, HerHusband wrote:
The WORST cheesecake was given to us as a gift. I don't know where they
bought it but it tasted like sawdust and flour. Absolutely disgusting. Of
course, we still ate it all.


http://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipes/...ake-61697.aspx

The variants on this theme suck too. My mother seldom got sucked into
the recipes on Kraft Television Theater but she gave this one a whirl.
Luckily she didn't consider Velveeta to be edible. I think Kraft
unleashed the green bean casserole with canned onion rings on top on the
world too.
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/17/2016 6:44 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
If using canned cherries or crushed pineapples, place them on the
crust before adding the cream cheese filling. (Don Y reduces his
filling, probably a good idea)


No! The pineapple reduction is the most tedious part! It's an hour
and a half standing over the stove with your hand continuously stirring
a hot, sputtering mixture!


Things done that way make for superior results though. I can't stand that long
anyway, but I may try it at least a partial reduction, next time.


Trust me, it is *grueling*! You have to boil off the excess liquid.
So, "steam". You have to stir virtually constantly (lest the
sweet mess carmelize to the pan) so your hands are right over
that hot/steamy mess. Which also means you can't "wander off".
And, it invariably sputters and spits gobs of hot, sticky goo onto
your hands.

Over the years, I've learned to do this hotter -- to cut down the
time involved (*to* 90 minutes! : ) but at the cost of having to
deal with the hotter environment for my hands.

(I don't wear gloves when working around the house; I sure as hell
won't when baking!)

And, of course, it also means you have to let the stuff cool for a long
time before placing it on the crust.

My crust is very thin/flimsy (egg/butter/flour/sugar/bakpwdr) -- just
a token layer to keep the fruit from sticking directly to the glass
baking dish. So, when the fruit is thickened, it is relatively easy to
poke through the crust layer while trying to spread the "jam".

I freeze, then slice and place in individual waxed paper "cups"
(so the individual pieces can be easily separated from each other),
then freeze (again) until hard, transfer to a foil covered piece of
cardboard and slide into a covered box (that I have previously rescued
or built) -- just to get it to whomever's home. Hence the added hour.


Never thought about freezing it. Making the large is only a few minutes more
than the small version and we'd have some a few weeks later.


In my case, making "large" lengthens the time for the crust and fruit
reduction. So, a project that is already long gets even longer
(I tend to make cheesecakes in batches of 2 or 4 so its a LOT of time
in the kitchen in a relatively short period)

I "need" it frozen to get it out of the baking dish intact as it
will be traveling to *somewhere* -- across the street or across
the state (e.g., I'll be making one for a buddy to bring to his mom
in Colorado for her upcoming 97th bday). My baking dish has vertical
sides (not sloping sides) and sees lots of use for other baked
goods, etc. So, I'm not willing to tie it up waiting for people
to remove a slice at a time from the dish. Freezing it (AFTER
letting it cool in the oven, then on a wire rack, then in the
refrigerator) lets me cut nice clean slices and transfer them
onto/into wax paper "cups"/wrappers (so they don't stick together
and can be easily lifted off a serving tray). As the crust is
so thin, it also helps to be able to SCRAPE the slices out of the
dish and keep that thin butter/flour layer intact, under the fruit.

I can then put the slices on an improvised "cookie sheet"/serving
tray (just a sheet of heavy cardboard wrapped in aluminum foil).
And, slide that into a packing box to ensure nothing manages to
"touch" the tops of the slices (even frozen, any contact is obvious
when the pieces are extracted). In the past, I'd tried putting
toothpicks in the pieces to hold a layer of saran wrap off of
their tops. This didn't work. Hence the idea of letting the BOX
protect them and just wrapping the entire box!

If its "traveling far", then the box sits in the very bottom of the
freezer chest for a few days before "delivery".

As the packing box isn't really air tight (despite wrapping it with
foil and saran wrap), its not suitable for long term storage.
So, when I make one for SWMBO, I move the pieces into small Tupperware
containers (e.g., 4 to a 6-in-sq container).

She has trained herself to remove two at a time (instead of just one!).
It takes a fairly long time to defrost. And, she's not disciplined
enough to just sit and WATCH it. So, picks at the still frozen FIRST
piece, trying to chip off little frozen chunks. This keeps her
busy and somewhat satisfied while the SECOND piece manages to thaw...

[The idea of taking it out the night before doesn't work; she'd want
to EAT it the night before! : ]

I used to make these for a friend and his wife. She used to get up
in the middle of the night -- allegedly asleep -- and help herself
to a piece out of the refrigerator, leaving a mess on the kitchen
counter for him the next morning. And *deny* doing it (sleep-eating?)

When I laughed at this explanation (thinking it an elaborate
rationalization for indulging in an unhealthy behavior), he assured me
that she is, in fact, asleep at these times. He's been awake and
watched her attack various sweets in this way!
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In the past, I'd tried putting
toothpicks in the pieces to hold a layer of saran wrap off of
their tops. This didn't work. Hence the idea of letting the BOX
protect them and just wrapping the entire box!

If its "traveling far", then the box sits in the very bottom of the
freezer chest for a few days before "delivery".

As the packing box isn't really air tight (despite wrapping it with
foil and saran wrap), its not suitable for long term storage.
So, when I make one for SWMBO, I move the pieces into small Tupperware
containers (e.g., 4 to a 6-in-sq container).


The reason for wrapping the box or the air-tight tupperware is to
have a place where the pieces can thaw without letting moisture
condense out of the surrounding air onto the pieces. Esp important
in monsoon when the relative humidity is so high -- "wet" cheesecake?

frown



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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/17/2016 3:59 PM, HerHusband wrote:
I "thin" the cream cheese with heavy cream, sour cream or milk
(depending on the Rx i am targeting). This makes for a "lighter"
product -- one that folks seem eager to go for seconds or thirds
(a NY-style cake seems to be a "self-limiting" proposition -- one
slice is usually enough).


One of the best cheesecakes I've ever eaten was a bourbon cheesecake at a
local restaurant. Rich and creamy, no cracks, not doughy but not some
wimpy fluffy cake either. I don't know what their secret was, but it was
amazing. Ironically we weren't impressed with the restaurant otherwise
and haven't been back since.

The WORST cheesecake was given to us as a gift. I don't know where they
bought it but it tasted like sawdust and flour. Absolutely disgusting. Of
course, we still ate it all.


Growing up, the folks in my extended family would have preferred fresh
cannoli to cheesecake. Yet another huge time sink in preparation...
and mere gulpseconds to see it all disappear!

Again, I don't like any of these things so what I make has been largely
determined by what folks around me enjoy eating. And, as its no skin
off THEIR back, those same folks see nothing wrong with shoveling it
down in one day!!

[The appeal of biscotti is that folks can discipline themselves to eat
two or maybe three at a time. I wrap them two per package as one per
package would invariably lead to a second (and then third and fourth!)
package being opened. If you put three in a package, then they
WILL eat three in a sitting. With just two in a package, they'll
hesitate before opening a second package (cuz they think four is too
many). So, I can get a week's consumption out of a batch (for a "couple";
two weeks for a single individual)]

I'm learning to think beyond the "making" step. E.g., SWMBO gets a batch
of biscotti every two weeks. This gets tiring (2-2.5 hours per batch)
and hard on the hands (imagine mixing cement with a wooden spoon).

So, I got clever and started cutting the slices a little thinner.
She retaliated by eating THREE at a time -- and there weren't 50%
more slices in the batch so I ended up having to make it MORE often!

[She's now terrified that I may stop making them as it is really hard
on my hands trying to stir that "concrete". Keeps looking for a
cushioned spoon for me (does she think I don't understand her
motivation??) : ]

I'm not fond of cheese (unless melted on a pizza or grated over "red
sauce". Cream cheese is perhaps the most disgusting -- it just looks
like a giant block of slimey FAT! (I buy the 3 pound blocks from
Costco)


I never liked cheese until I met my wife. Her family was very low income
and would get 5 pound blocks of cheese from the food banks. So they ate a
lot of cheese. When I met my wife she would cut some up into slices and
start chewing. I'm like "you are just going to EAT it"? Up till then I
had only had cheese IN things (pizza, grilled cheese sandwich, etc.).


I eat cheese:
- on pizza (usually mozarella on the dough, then romano on the toppings
and parmessan on the romano), melted
- on grinders (provolone/caciocovallo), again, melted
- on red sauce (siciliano pepato), grated (so almost melted from the heat
of the sauce)

If I order a burger somewhere and it arrives with (any kind of) cheese
on it, I send it back. "Cold" (hard/firm) cheese I'll carefully remove
from a salad/antipasto and sit on the side of my plate.

These days we eat all things cheese, especially pepper jack, smoked
gouda, or any of the specialty cheeses. We enjoy seeking out unique
cheese and giving them a try. I still don't care for any of the "moldy"
cheeses like bleu cheese or roquefurt.


The siciliano pepato is reasonably hard to come by. Esp aged for a very
long time. I've managed to find what they *call* "suitable for grating",
here, but it is very soft -- not aged long at all. I used to bring 20
pounds back from New England on plane trips. But, it is REALLY pungent
and a hassle to get through metal detectors (lots of nondescript "blocks"
wrapped in metal foil???)

Asiago on bread or seafood pasta is amazing.


SWMBO puts cheese on most things. I'll be making braised asparagus
ww/ linguine aglio e olio tomorrow night (was supposed to do that tonight
but got distracted). She'll dutifully *cover* her serving with shredded
Romano (sheesh! How can you taste the garlic through all that cheese?)

A typical Friday movie night almost always includes a glass of red wine,
cheese, and crackers.


If SWMBO drags out cheese and crackers, it'll give me an excuse to make
a steak (she's not fond of beef). Or, if I have a Bolognese sauce handy,
I'll heat some in the microwave and spread it over a grinder roll; gives
me my "fix" of bread, meat and, of course, SAUCE! :

I made some brownies for a neighbor. Daughter came walking out of the
house eating one: "Did you make these from scratch?" (is there any
other way??) "Wow! My mom has NEVER made them from scratch!" Her Mom
didn't look too pleased at that!


My sister-in-law is big on prepackaged foods. I can't stand the stuff.
Brownies, pasta sauces, etc. should ALWAYS be made from scratch!


Unfortunately, they take a lot more time (I am obsessed with time).
And, not all folks appreciate the time (and expense) involved.
"Hey, if you can't taste the difference, why should I bother??"
I have to consider, carefully, who I'm "targeting" for the treat.
I try to make note of who likes what, and which variations (he
likes chewwy; she likes crunchy; little Timmy doesn't like nuts; etc.)
Plus, dietary/health restrictions (allergic to tomatoes; low sodium;
peanut allergy; etc.). And, "other" (e.g., I use liqueurs in many of
my creations; one "alcoholic" friend won't touch any of these -- even
if the alcohol has all been burned off in preparation!)

Amusingly, one of the sweets that I enjoyed most, growing up, was a
"chocolate cake with vanilla frosting" (yet I am not fond of chocolate).
Some years later, I was home for my bday and my mom asked if I wanted
"anything special". I said, "Yeah! Show me how to make that cake!"

She was puzzled and we spent some time trying to figure out WHICH cake
I meant. She finally exclaimed, "Oh, the BOX cake!" I'd never heard
it called that. I was expecting "chocolate something-or-other". When
I asked why it was called "Box Cake", she laughed: "Cuz its the (only)
cake that I make from a (premixed) BOX!"

[It's really not a very good cake -- more like the cake version of
white bread/air pudding. But, it is a reasonably inert "vehicle"
to transport the yummy "from scratch" butter frosting to your mouth!]

The other "favorite" is a style of cocoa-flavored cookies (did I mention
I DON'T like CHOCOLATE?? : ) that are typically made over the holidays.
Almost like little fruit cakes: cherries, nuts, raisins, cocoa, etc.
They are a huge undertaking -- and practically no one (except my ex-BinL)
likes them, other than me. So, I seldom make them. When I *do*, I will
eat 10 pounds in 72 hours. And, spend much of that time on the porcelain
throne (WAY too much fruit for my system to process!). Again, a solid
day of work and they're gone in the blink of an eye...
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/17/2016 6:38 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 5/17/2016 6:59 PM, HerHusband wrote:

A typical Friday movie night almost always includes a glass of red wine,
cheese, and crackers.


Add some bread and you have dinner. When we go to Italy we usually eat our big
meal of the day at lunch while out, then go back to the villa and have the
cheese/bread/meat/wine.


When I was a kid, it was common to see (extended) family members eating
bread dipped in "red sauce" (big Sicilian family). This always seemed
"gross"; "where's the PASTA?"

As I got older, I eventually came upon the "attraction" of this.

First, I noticed that some folks eat pasta for the *pasta* (noodles).
Others, for the *sauce*.

[The different noodle shapes are designed to carry differing amounts of
sauce to your mouth ON the pasta]

I noticed that I preferred pasta harder (al dente). And, shapes that
were associated with carrying MORE sauce (esp fusilli bucati/lunghi;
though I'll eat "regular" fusilli/rotini in a pinch). I.e., that
I enjoy the pasta for the sauce, more than the noodles!

And, from there, to other sauce-based meals -- meatball grinders, etc.

So, now think nothing of just laddling sauce on a grinder roll and
calling it a meal!
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On 5/17/2016 8:05 PM, rbowman wrote:
The variants on this theme suck too. My mother seldom got sucked into the
recipes on Kraft Television Theater but she gave this one a whirl. Luckily she
didn't consider Velveeta to be edible. I think Kraft unleashed the green bean
casserole with canned onion rings on top on the world too.


There is ONE thing that I make that "came off a can". I don't know what
the folks who wrote the Rx call it but we always called them "Hello Dolly
Bars".

A crust formed of crushed graham crackers in melted butter.
Atop this, condensed milk (sweet, syrupy).
Then, chocolate chips and chopped walnuts.
Finally, flaked coconut.

Press all the ingredients into the syrupy stuff. Bake.

*FREEZE* and cut into finger sized bars.

EAT FROZEN. Like little candy bars!

Over the years, I've dramatically changed the quantities and types
of ingredients -- but the basic Rx remains the same. Tasty
for the chocoholics around you. And, absolutely the most unhealthy
treat imaginable!! :
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 05/17/2016 11:55 PM, Don Y wrote:

There is ONE thing that I make that "came off a can". I don't know what
the folks who wrote the Rx call it but we always called them "Hello Dolly
Bars".

A crust formed of crushed graham crackers in melted butter.
Atop this, condensed milk (sweet, syrupy).
Then, chocolate chips and chopped walnuts.
Finally, flaked coconut.

Press all the ingredients into the syrupy stuff. Bake.

*FREEZE* and cut into finger sized bars.

EAT FROZEN. Like little candy bars!


Good Lord! That ought to keep your pancreas busy for a while!
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

A typical Friday movie night almost always includes a glass of red wine,
cheese, and crackers.


Add some bread and you have dinner.


I typically need more substance than that. I'm definitely NOT a vegetarian,
every meal needs at least a little bit of meat.

When we go to Italy


Must be nice... I love the way you say it so routinely, like "when we go to
McDonalds".

we usually eat our big meal of the day at lunch while out, then go
back to the villa and have the cheese/bread/meat/wine.


I thought I had heard lunch was the bigger meal in most European countries.
That always seems harder for me to do unless we go out to eat. I don't want
to get up and start cooking a big meal in the morning.

I usually eat a decent breakfast, a smallish lunch, a reasonable dinner,
and a snack or two in the evening.

If we go out for breakfast, I usually overeat and can easily skip lunch and
sometimes even dinner.

Anthony Watson
www.watsondiy.com
www.mountainsoftware.com


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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

Yet another huge time sink in preparation...
and mere gulpseconds to see it all disappear!


Since I cook most of our meals, that's one of the things that always
annoys me. I can spend hours making a meal or dessert, but it only takes
a few minutes to eat it. That just seems wrong somehow.

those same folks see nothing wrong with shoveling it down in one day!


Cookies are my weakness. Sweet, chewy, and easy to grab. I always eat way
too many in a day when I make cookies.

If I order a burger somewhere and it arrives with (any kind of) cheese
on it, I send it back.


Not me, I request cheese if they don't include it already. Pepper jack is
best, cheddar works, American will pass if that's all they have.

Or go Hawaiian with swiss cheese, pineapple, and teriyaki sauce.

it is REALLY pungent


Nope, I'll pass on smelly cheeses...

Unfortunately, they take a lot more time (I am obsessed with time).


A lot of prepackaged foods take almost as much time as made from scratch
foods. Sometimes we receive brownie or soup mixes in gift baskets. By the
time you measure everything out, add the eggs, oil, and whatever you
could have made it from scratch just as quickly. It tastes better and I
know what's going into it. Lord only knows what they stick in those
packaged mixes.

I have to consider, carefully, who I'm "targeting" for the treat.


My mother-in-law doesn't have any teeth and can't/won't wear her
dentures. She also has medical conditions that limit her diet. Trying to
find things she can eat is nearly impossible.

I asked why it was called "Box Cake", she laughed: "Cuz its the
(only) cake that I make from a (premixed) BOX!"


My wife makes and decorates cakes often. She makes her own buttercream
frosting, but just uses the cake from boxes.

I don't like cake anyway, but the cake mixes do seem to produce a lighter
cake than anything I've tried making from scratch. Mine always come out
dense and heavy. I'm probably using the wrong flour.

Buttercream frosting tastes OK, but we're just talking about sweetened
fat. A few bites is all I can handle.

My wife also loves carrot cake with massive amounts of cream cheese
frosting. Definitely not my thing.

Anthony Watson
www.watsondiy.com
www.mountainsoftware.com
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/18/2016 8:10 AM, HerHusband wrote:
Yet another huge time sink in preparation...
and mere gulpseconds to see it all disappear!


Since I cook most of our meals, that's one of the things that always
annoys me. I can spend hours making a meal or dessert, but it only takes
a few minutes to eat it. That just seems wrong somehow.


I do most of the meal prep here, as well (unless we're "fending for
ourselves"). But, SWMBO is a slow eater and I can eat standing *at*
the stove (i.e., barely dirty a plate). I'll have eaten and cleaned
up the kitchen before she finishes!

[Some folks live to eat; I eat to live. How many calories do I need
to keep the engine running?]

those same folks see nothing wrong with shoveling it down in one day!


Cookies are my weakness. Sweet, chewy, and easy to grab. I always eat way
too many in a day when I make cookies.


Sugar and fat -- two things that we seldom encountered together on the
evolutionary path. Two things that our bodies seem to want to binge on
out of fear they may never encounter it, again! :

I make fairly large batches of cookies. I.e., the smallest batch I
make would be pecan sandies (around 17 dozen). Some of the more
ethnic cookies I'll make 100 dozen at a time. But, almost always as
giveaways or for some special event (though SWMBO will eat pecan sandies
out of the freezer -- they're actually very good, frozen! Like little
chips of butter!)

I'm pretty good at making vs. nibbling. Biggest offender is pizzelles
as its not uncommon to make a "bad" one (cosmetically). Those get
consumed hot off the iron.

[Actually, if you consider them "cookies", that's a small batch as well;
usually just 6 dozen as that's 2 hours standing in one place]

Unfortunately, they take a lot more time (I am obsessed with time).


A lot of prepackaged foods take almost as much time as made from scratch
foods. Sometimes we receive brownie or soup mixes in gift baskets. By the
time you measure everything out, add the eggs, oil, and whatever you
could have made it from scratch just as quickly.


Yeah, I can't see what they "save you". I *guess* you could have powdered
eggs and powdered milk (ick!). Oil to provide the fat in lieu of butter
(another ick -- I don't use oil *in* anything and consider butter to be
a sacred food! : ).

But, invariably, it's "liquid ingredients plus sugar; then add dry".
How long does it take to measure out a few dry ingredients and prepackage
them in a box?

E.g., for brownies, that would be flour, salt and baking powder. *Maybe*
include the sugar as well. But, what about the eggs, butter, and chocolate
(the last two of which need to be liquid)? Vanilla? Sour cream? Nuts?
I just don't see that you end up saving anything -- but *do* end up
"sacrificing" something!

For something like pecan sandies, so much of the mix is butter that I
can't see how you could make anything approaching that quality without
USING butter.

It tastes better and I
know what's going into it. Lord only knows what they stick in those
packaged mixes.


We used to make pancakes "out of a box" -- just add milk. But,
pancakes are so nondescript...

I have to consider, carefully, who I'm "targeting" for the treat.


My mother-in-law doesn't have any teeth and can't/won't wear her
dentures. She also has medical conditions that limit her diet. Trying to
find things she can eat is nearly impossible.


In my case, I have a growing number of diabetic friends. It's hard to
find substitutes for sugar -- that aren't ALSO carbohydrates!

E.g., I can reformulate most of my ice cream Rx's to eliminate *most*
of the carbs -- at some cost to taste and mouthfeel. But, there's no
real way to replace the sugar in a cookie -- that doesn't introduce
another carb in its place!

So, it's almost always ice cream that accompanies me to one of their
events. And, a non-fruit flavor, at that (most of the fruit flavors
carry additional sugars with the fruits). E.g., butter pecan is a
favorite (quarter pound of butter in the mix -- in addition to all that
heavy cream! X-, )

I asked why it was called "Box Cake", she laughed: "Cuz its the
(only) cake that I make from a (premixed) BOX!"


My wife makes and decorates cakes often. She makes her own buttercream
frosting, but just uses the cake from boxes.

I don't like cake anyway, but the cake mixes do seem to produce a lighter
cake than anything I've tried making from scratch. Mine always come out
dense and heavy. I'm probably using the wrong flour.


I think the box mixes have extra leavening agents and tend not to use the
heavier fats (butter, sour cream, etc.).

The only cake I make is a "jewish coffee cake". Definitely denser than
the air puddings that come out of a box. But, I use a lot of sour cream
to help keep it light and moist.

Buttercream frosting tastes OK, but we're just talking about sweetened
fat. A few bites is all I can handle.


Yes. The appeal of the "chocolate BOX cake" I had in my youth was that
you had a fair amount of cake (air pudding) with a thin veneer of fat/sugar.
Proportions are important.

Sort of like everyone has a different sense of "proper proportions" for
a PB&J -- some folks are heavy on the PB; others on the J. Get outside
that "zone" and it's not worth eating! :

My wife also loves carrot cake with massive amounts of cream cheese
frosting. Definitely not my thing.


My preferred fat is butter. I.e., the idea of a bagel with cream cheese
just seems like a cruel thing to do to a bagel -- before throwing it away!

OTOH, I use "(vegetable) shortening" in my cavatelli; butter just wouldn't
fare well. And, margarine in the pizzelles (but in nothing else!) as butter
burns too easily.
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/18/2016 7:21 AM, HerHusband wrote:
I usually eat a decent breakfast, a smallish lunch, a reasonable dinner,
and a snack or two in the evening.

If we go out for breakfast, I usually overeat and can easily skip lunch and
sometimes even dinner.


The idea of eating ANYTHING within about 4 hours of rising is *so*
unappealing! So, if SWMBO wants a shared meal, it's either supper
or she's got to find a day when I've got to be awake early
(doctor's appointment, etc.). E.g., she wants the meal I had
planned for last night's supper as today's lunch. So, she made
a point of making sure I was awake this morning :

("punishment" for not making the meal last night?? : )

As I'm not fond of that meal, I'll coast through it in
anticipation of beef w/broccoli tonight!

The real risk is that I may forget to eat supper and find myself
having spent an entire day without any "food".
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 2016-05-18 12:54 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 5/18/2016 8:10 AM, HerHusband wrote:
Yet another huge time sink in preparation...
and mere gulpseconds to see it all disappear!


Since I cook most of our meals, that's one of the things that always
annoys me. I can spend hours making a meal or dessert, but it only takes
a few minutes to eat it. That just seems wrong somehow.


I do most of the meal prep here, as well (unless we're "fending for
ourselves"). But, SWMBO is a slow eater and I can eat standing *at*
the stove (i.e., barely dirty a plate). I'll have eaten and cleaned
up the kitchen before she finishes!

[Some folks live to eat; I eat to live. How many calories do I need
to keep the engine running?]

those same folks see nothing wrong with shoveling it down in one day!


Cookies are my weakness. Sweet, chewy, and easy to grab. I always eat way
too many in a day when I make cookies.


Sugar and fat -- two things that we seldom encountered together on the
evolutionary path. Two things that our bodies seem to want to binge on
out of fear they may never encounter it, again! :

I make fairly large batches of cookies. I.e., the smallest batch I
make would be pecan sandies (around 17 dozen). Some of the more
ethnic cookies I'll make 100 dozen at a time. But, almost always as
giveaways or for some special event (though SWMBO will eat pecan sandies
out of the freezer -- they're actually very good, frozen! Like little
chips of butter!)

I'm pretty good at making vs. nibbling. Biggest offender is pizzelles
as its not uncommon to make a "bad" one (cosmetically). Those get
consumed hot off the iron.

[Actually, if you consider them "cookies", that's a small batch as well;
usually just 6 dozen as that's 2 hours standing in one place]

Unfortunately, they take a lot more time (I am obsessed with time).


A lot of prepackaged foods take almost as much time as made from scratch
foods. Sometimes we receive brownie or soup mixes in gift baskets. By the
time you measure everything out, add the eggs, oil, and whatever you
could have made it from scratch just as quickly.


Yeah, I can't see what they "save you". I *guess* you could have powdered
eggs and powdered milk (ick!). Oil to provide the fat in lieu of butter
(another ick -- I don't use oil *in* anything and consider butter to be
a sacred food! : ).

But, invariably, it's "liquid ingredients plus sugar; then add dry".
How long does it take to measure out a few dry ingredients and prepackage
them in a box?

E.g., for brownies, that would be flour, salt and baking powder. *Maybe*
include the sugar as well. But, what about the eggs, butter, and chocolate
(the last two of which need to be liquid)? Vanilla? Sour cream? Nuts?
I just don't see that you end up saving anything -- but *do* end up
"sacrificing" something!

For something like pecan sandies, so much of the mix is butter that I
can't see how you could make anything approaching that quality without
USING butter.

It tastes better and I
know what's going into it. Lord only knows what they stick in those
packaged mixes.


We used to make pancakes "out of a box" -- just add milk. But,
pancakes are so nondescript...

I have to consider, carefully, who I'm "targeting" for the treat.


My mother-in-law doesn't have any teeth and can't/won't wear her
dentures. She also has medical conditions that limit her diet. Trying to
find things she can eat is nearly impossible.


In my case, I have a growing number of diabetic friends. It's hard to
find substitutes for sugar -- that aren't ALSO carbohydrates!

E.g., I can reformulate most of my ice cream Rx's to eliminate *most*
of the carbs -- at some cost to taste and mouthfeel. But, there's no
real way to replace the sugar in a cookie -- that doesn't introduce
another carb in its place!

So, it's almost always ice cream that accompanies me to one of their
events. And, a non-fruit flavor, at that (most of the fruit flavors
carry additional sugars with the fruits). E.g., butter pecan is a
favorite (quarter pound of butter in the mix -- in addition to all that
heavy cream! X-, )

I asked why it was called "Box Cake", she laughed: "Cuz its the
(only) cake that I make from a (premixed) BOX!"


My wife makes and decorates cakes often. She makes her own buttercream
frosting, but just uses the cake from boxes.

I don't like cake anyway, but the cake mixes do seem to produce a lighter
cake than anything I've tried making from scratch. Mine always come out
dense and heavy. I'm probably using the wrong flour.


I think the box mixes have extra leavening agents and tend not to use the
heavier fats (butter, sour cream, etc.).

The only cake I make is a "jewish coffee cake". Definitely denser than
the air puddings that come out of a box. But, I use a lot of sour cream
to help keep it light and moist.

Buttercream frosting tastes OK, but we're just talking about sweetened
fat. A few bites is all I can handle.


Yes. The appeal of the "chocolate BOX cake" I had in my youth was that
you had a fair amount of cake (air pudding) with a thin veneer of
fat/sugar.
Proportions are important.

Sort of like everyone has a different sense of "proper proportions" for
a PB&J -- some folks are heavy on the PB; others on the J. Get outside
that "zone" and it's not worth eating! :

My wife also loves carrot cake with massive amounts of cream cheese
frosting. Definitely not my thing.


My preferred fat is butter. I.e., the idea of a bagel with cream cheese
just seems like a cruel thing to do to a bagel -- before throwing it away!

OTOH, I use "(vegetable) shortening" in my cavatelli; butter just wouldn't
fare well. And, margarine in the pizzelles (but in nothing else!) as
butter
burns too easily.


It seems like a fair number of males in here (given there aren't many
females), do most of the cooking at home, I do also. I do not make a
lot of dessert outside of pies, but various meat dishes for the
main/only course most nights.

--
Froz....

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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 2016-05-18 1:12 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 5/18/2016 7:21 AM, HerHusband wrote:
I usually eat a decent breakfast, a smallish lunch, a reasonable dinner,
and a snack or two in the evening.

If we go out for breakfast, I usually overeat and can easily skip
lunch and
sometimes even dinner.


The idea of eating ANYTHING within about 4 hours of rising is *so*
unappealing! So, if SWMBO wants a shared meal, it's either supper
or she's got to find a day when I've got to be awake early
(doctor's appointment, etc.). E.g., she wants the meal I had
planned for last night's supper as today's lunch. So, she made
a point of making sure I was awake this morning :

("punishment" for not making the meal last night?? : )

As I'm not fond of that meal, I'll coast through it in
anticipation of beef w/broccoli tonight!

The real risk is that I may forget to eat supper and find myself
having spent an entire day without any "food".


My wife regularly eats the leftovers of meals I have cooked, for
breakfast the next day. I just take it as a compliment and move on. I
also rarely eat breakfast, but a breakfast style meal at dinner time has
been known to happen.

--
Froz....

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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/18/2016 10:21 AM, FrozenNorth wrote:
It seems like a fair number of males in here (given there aren't many females),
do most of the cooking at home, I do also. I do not make a lot of dessert
outside of pies, but various meat dishes for the main/only course most nights.


I think men tend to be more concerned with "meals"; women more concerned
with "eating".

Put a time-lock on the kitchen that only opens at meal times and most men
would be comfortable. Women, IME, would be squirreling things away to
nibble on for those periods when the kitchen is off-limits.

If I locked up the cheese, chocolate, crackers, nuts, etc. SWMBO would
be climbing the walls in short order!

I, OTOH, would be happy eating a steak -- even if JUST a steak -- once a day.
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/18/2016 10:26 AM, FrozenNorth wrote:
My wife regularly eats the leftovers of meals I have cooked, for breakfast the
next day. I just take it as a compliment and move on. I also rarely eat
breakfast, but a breakfast style meal at dinner time has been known to happen.


I have no problems making a bunch of eggs for a meal (but, a BUNCH, not just
*one*/two). And, bacon is good at any time! : I can eat a bowl of
"cereal" any time -- though, again, my idea of a "bowl" is more like a
SAUCEPAN!

Not fond of left-overs (though I will get two meals out of tonight's
beef w/broccoli). I cringe when I see folks eat cold pizza (having
ANY pizza left-over is anathema to me!)

When I was a kid, I used to enjoy Gerber's High Protein Cereal
("baby food") prepared with applesauce and hot milk. But, would
never be sufficiently motivated to *prepare* something like that
first thing in the morning! (it's no longer sold in stores so
I don't have to face that issue)

Now, I'm happy just drinking tea for the first few hours out of bed...
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On 2016-05-18 2:03 PM, Don Y wrote:
On 5/18/2016 10:21 AM, FrozenNorth wrote:
It seems like a fair number of males in here (given there aren't many
females),
do most of the cooking at home, I do also. I do not make a lot of
dessert
outside of pies, but various meat dishes for the main/only course most
nights.


I think men tend to be more concerned with "meals"; women more concerned
with "eating".

Put a time-lock on the kitchen that only opens at meal times and most men
would be comfortable.


What, how do I get to my beer?

Women, IME, would be squirreling things away to
nibble on for those periods when the kitchen is off-limits.

Ayep. :-)

If I locked up the cheese, chocolate, crackers, nuts, etc. SWMBO would
be climbing the walls in short order!

That gives me an idea.

I, OTOH, would be happy eating a steak -- even if JUST a steak -- once a
day.

I need the variety, but I see your point.

--
Froz....

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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/18/2016 11:14 AM, FrozenNorth wrote:
I, OTOH, would be happy eating a steak -- even if JUST a steak -- once a
day.


I need the variety, but I see your point.


It's an EVENT (men), not a PROCESS (women)


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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 05/18/2016 10:10 AM, HerHusband wrote:
Yet another huge time sink in preparation...
and mere gulpseconds to see it all disappear!


Since I cook most of our meals, that's one of the things that always
annoys me. I can spend hours making a meal or dessert, but it only takes
a few minutes to eat it. That just seems wrong somehow.

those same folks see nothing wrong with shoveling it down in one day!


Cookies are my weakness. Sweet, chewy, and easy to grab. I always eat way
too many in a day when I make cookies.


I like cookies. NOT the "hard a a rock" cookies sold in stores. I'll get
then to coke out soft when I bake them (impossible for some people since
time is critical [9 minutes good, 10 minutes hard], but worth it).

If I order a burger somewhere and it arrives with (any kind of) cheese
on it, I send it back.


Not me, I request cheese if they don't include it already. Pepper jack is
best, cheddar works, American will pass if that's all they have.

Or go Hawaiian with swiss cheese, pineapple, and teriyaki sauce.

it is REALLY pungent


Nope, I'll pass on smelly cheeses...


I seem to remember a story involving an (institutional) kitchen accident
with smelly cheese. Someone called it "a feta worse than death".

[snip]

My wife also loves carrot cake with massive amounts of cream cheese
frosting. Definitely not my thing.


I don't want that. I also don't want any red velvet cake yogurt. Red
velvet cake is good cake. YOGURT isn't cake.

Anthony Watson
www.watsondiy.com
www.mountainsoftware.com



--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"Being surprised at the fact that the universe is fine tuned for life is
akin to a puddle being surprised at how well it fits its hole" --
Douglas Adams


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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 05/17/2016 10:27 PM, Don Y wrote:
Growing up, the folks in my extended family would have preferred fresh
cannoli to cheesecake. Yet another huge time sink in preparation...
and mere gulpseconds to see it all disappear!


One of the drawbacks of living in White Bread Central. When I was in the
Boston area saints' day in the North End was always good for calamari
salad and canolli. Then you could go watch the old farts drink wine and
play bocce.
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

On 5/18/2016 7:38 PM, rbowman wrote:
On 05/17/2016 10:27 PM, Don Y wrote:
Growing up, the folks in my extended family would have preferred fresh
cannoli to cheesecake. Yet another huge time sink in preparation...
and mere gulpseconds to see it all disappear!


One of the drawbacks of living in White Bread Central. When I was in the Boston
area saints' day in the North End was always good for calamari salad and
canolli. Then you could go watch the old farts drink wine and play bocce.


True of many towns/villages back east.

E.g., lots of "______ Political Clubs" (fill in the blank with
your favorite nationality). AFAICT, just a place where *men*
of ________ nationality can get away from their wives to play
cards, shoot the sh*t and otherwise lament how tough they're lives
are... :

First set of cannoli tubes I bought were aluminum. Big mistake
(doesn't shed heat fast enough!)

The real trick with cannoli is that you can't fill the shells until
you are ready to eat them. I mean, REALLY ready to eat them (like
NOW!)
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Default Cheesecake, Not Don Y's 5 hour

My wife regularly eats the leftovers of meals I have cooked

We often have leftovers for dinner the following day. Two days is my
personal limit though. My wife can't stand to throw anything out, so if
we've already eaten a meal for two days, she usually takes the remainder
for her lunches.

I also rarely eat breakfast


I eat a big bowl of cold cereal and a banana every morning.

My wife likes to eat the moment she gets out of bed, but I usually need to
be up for a couple hours before I feel like eating. Since I eat breakfast
later, I usually have less of an appetite at lunch.

but a breakfast style meal at dinner time has been known to happen.


Yep, it's fun to have waffles or pancakes for dinner every now and then. It
has been a while come to think of it.

Anthony Watson
www.watsondiy.com
www.mountainsoftware.com

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