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In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. Anyone use them for
similar projects?
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On May 21, 3:52*pm, Jim wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many. *

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


CDX will last much longer than BC.
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On Sat, 21 May 2011 14:07:52 -0700, Red wrote:

On May 21, 3:52*pm, Jim wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to
find that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will
be covered by green tarps of which I have many.

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider
instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


CDX will last much longer than BC.


Can CDX be cut at the store. Couple years back I bought some pressure
treated timbers and the said the weren't allowed due to arsenic. Might
that be the difference between CDX and ACX?
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"Jim" wrote in message
...
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. Anyone use them for
similar projects?


The actual steel metal sheeting they have at the Borgs makes a fine cover.
Some of the better ones actually have up to eleven levels of coatings on
them, and you can buy ridge cap and edging to make a really professional
little wood shelter. It is about $1.25 per foot, and that would amount to 3
square foot. So, a guy could make a nice metal cover for two sheets, and
some trim, translates out to about $50. If you can weld, you can
incorporate a metal frame of 1" x 1" .065" square tube at about $.60 per
lineal foot.

It is what I am going to be making for my firewood this year, but it will be
a larger version, as I have about 100 sheets of 12' long sheeting, and
hundreds of feet of 1" square tube, and a supplier of cheap trim. I shall
just have to go buy some ridge cap.

Consider wrapping three sides to keep the wind from blowing snow or rain
into the wood, and other considerations as to where this will set so that
you will have a dry supply of wood.

A word of caution: Wood is a preferred home of brown recluse spiders and
other nasty critters. Poison can be spread so that it is on the flooring,
and all around the wood, but avoid spraying the wood directly, as you are
going to burn said wood. Adhesive spider traps have no toxic agents. Watch
your wood for signs of mold, and other deterioration, and deal with it.
Make your rack so that there is some allowance for air to circulate around
it, which will help it keep dry, and keep down on mold and "stuff".

This summer we shall go get our obligatory 5 cords for $20 from the BLM. We
ran out last winter, and that ain't gonna happen again, even if I have to
make a special wood shed.

HTH

Steve

HTH

Steve


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"Red" wrote in message
...
On May 21, 3:52 pm, Jim wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. Anyone use them for
similar projects?


CDX will last much longer than BC.

And metal never rots.

Steve




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Jim wrote the following:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.



So why do you need to construct anything? Won't the tarp alone do the job?
Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. Anyone use them for
similar projects?



--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
In the original Orange County. Est. 1683
To email, remove the double zeroes after @
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On May 21, 4:28*pm, Jim wrote:
On Sat, 21 May 2011 14:07:52 -0700, Red wrote:
On May 21, 3:52*pm, Jim wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to
find that happy median between durability and cost.


At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will
be covered by green tarps of which I have many.


Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider
instead?


Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


CDX will last much longer than BC.


Can CDX be cut at the store. *Couple years back I bought some pressure
treated timbers and the said the weren't allowed due to arsenic. *Might
that be the difference between CDX and ACX?


Yes. CDX is not pressure treated but is rated for exterior use
without ground contact. Since you are covering it with a tarp it
should last quite a while.
Arsenic treated lumber (ACQ) was banned several years back and you
probably will never find it on the shelves anymore. Todays PT lumber
is mostly MCQ (micronized copper) which replaced it's corrosion prone
predecessor.
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On May 21, 6:13*pm, willshak wrote:
Jim wrote the following:



In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.


At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many. *


So why do you need to construct anything? Won't the tarp alone do the job?

Green tarps over a wood pile will only last a few months due to
chaffing. And I've never found any made to a size that fit my wood
pile.



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On May 21, 8:14*pm, Red wrote:
On May 21, 4:28*pm, Jim wrote:





On Sat, 21 May 2011 14:07:52 -0700, Red wrote:
On May 21, 3:52*pm, Jim wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to
find that happy median between durability and cost.


At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will
be covered by green tarps of which I have many.


Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider
instead?


Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


CDX will last much longer than BC.


Can CDX be cut at the store. *Couple years back I bought some pressure
treated timbers and the said the weren't allowed due to arsenic. *Might
that be the difference between CDX and ACX?


Yes. *CDX is not pressure treated but is rated for exterior use
without ground contact. *Since you are covering it with a tarp it
should last quite a while.
Arsenic treated lumber (ACQ) was banned several years back and you
probably will never find it on the shelves anymore. *Todays PT lumber
is mostly MCQ (micronized copper) which replaced it's corrosion prone
predecessor.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


We burn several cords a year and just cover ours with tarps held down
with concrete blocks on the corners and brick on top.
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Green tarps over a wood pile will only last a few months due to
chaffing. And I've never found any made to a size that fit my wood
pile.

reply:

When I want to go get wood, I don't want to pull off a tarp with a foot of
snow on it, or is sopping wet. It's windy, it's sleeting, it's cold. I
don't want to spend any more time than I need to fetch some wood. And I
sure don't want to wrestle with a sodden tarp.

How anyone cannot grasp that a tarp cover for a wood pile is a weak idea is
beyond me.

Or they don't use wood to heat.

Steve




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Steve B wrote the following:
Green tarps over a wood pile will only last a few months due to
chaffing. And I've never found any made to a size that fit my wood
pile.

reply:

When I want to go get wood, I don't want to pull off a tarp with a foot of
snow on it, or is sopping wet. It's windy, it's sleeting, it's cold. I
don't want to spend any more time than I need to fetch some wood. And I
sure don't want to wrestle with a sodden tarp.

How anyone cannot grasp that a tarp cover for a wood pile is a weak idea is
beyond me.

Or they don't use wood to heat.

Steve


Just asking. Don't get your panties in a knot.
It's not like asking where to get a star drill.
Didn't you killfile me after that exchange?

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
In the original Orange County. Est. 1683
To email, remove the double zeroes after @
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On Sat, 21 May 2011 19:13:35 -0400, willshak wrote:

Jim wrote the following:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to
find that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will
be covered by green tarps of which I have many.



So why do you need to construct anything? Won't the tarp alone do the
job?


Insufficient pitch to begin with, not A viable option to increase the
pitch as I'd need to modify the shed roof it connects to.

Although held taught with truckers tie down straps the water collects and
overpowers the straps. End result sagging tarps and pulled grommets.

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"Jim" wrote in message
...
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. Anyone use them for
similar projects?


I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. I've tried various methods of
protection and what I found best is nothing. Wood, tarps, sheeting,
fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another. Nothing works
well enough for me. We get about 48" of snow on a typical winter, but
rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. It falls right off the logs
when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood.

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On May 21, 8:22*pm, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:
"Jim" wrote in message

...

In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.


At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.


Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?


Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. *I've tried various methods of
protection and *what I found best is nothing. *Wood, tarps, sheeting,
fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another. *Nothing works
well enough for me. * We get about 48" of snow on a typical winter, but
rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. *It falls right off the logs
when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood.


Yep. As for rain on it, only the top layer will get wet and then only
surface. I just toss that stuff aside and use the dry wood under
it. But then I live in a semi-arid area...

Harry K
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On 5/21/2011 11:33 PM, Harry K wrote:
On May 21, 8:22 pm, "Ed wrote:
wrote in message

...

In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.


At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.


Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?


Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. Anyone use them for
similar projects?


I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. I've tried various methods of
protection and what I found best is nothing. Wood, tarps, sheeting,
fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another. Nothing works
well enough for me. We get about 48" of snow on a typical winter, but
rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. It falls right off the logs
when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood.


Yep. As for rain on it, only the top layer will get wet and then only
surface. I just toss that stuff aside and use the dry wood under
it. But then I live in a semi-arid area...

Harry K


The better and closer roof you put over the wood, the more likely things
(that you don't want in the house) will make a home in the stack.

I'm not convinced using (purchased) wood as a main heat source makes
financial sense (see other thread), but if I was to go down that road, I
think I would make a dedicated 3 and 1/2 sided shed for it, with rails
to hold the bottom layer of wood out of the mud, and enough headroom so
the top layer wasn't nice and dark. Doesn't need to be fancy or very
strong- just enough structure to hold the roof panels (probably
corrugated metal) and enough sidewall to keep the sideways rain off the
wood stack itself. Orient it and leave enough gaps so plenty of air
passes through, etc. The privacy screen around an old pit toilet at a
state park beach comes to mind.

--
aem sends...


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On May 21, 9:52*pm, Jim wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many. *

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


The best thing I ever had for drying wood is a polytunnel. Dunno what
you call them in America but there's pix here. They are intended for
horticulture.

http://www.citadelpolytunnels.com/

There is a door in each end so ventilation can be controlled and it
gets very hot inside on sunny days and drys the wood out really fast.
Also because there's a door at each end, the wood can be used in
rotation.
The plastic sheet lasts around ten years and can be fixed with tape if
it gets ripped accidently.
Best located in the sun to speed drying.
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On May 22, 8:30*am, harry wrote:
On May 21, 9:52*pm, Jim wrote:

In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.


At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many. *


Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?


Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


The best thing I ever had for drying wood is a polytunnel. *Dunno what
you call them in America but there's pix here. *They are intended for
horticulture.

http://www.citadelpolytunnels.com/

There is a door in each end so ventilation can be controlled and it
gets very hot inside on sunny days and drys the wood out really fast.
Also because there's a door at each end, the wood can be used in
rotation.
The plastic sheet lasts around ten years and can be fixed with tape if
it gets ripped accidently.
Best located in the sun to speed drying.


BTW, You need to use the special UV stablised plastic sheet,ordinary
stuff rots in a year or two.
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On Sat, 21 May 2011 23:22:12 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:


I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. I've tried various
methods of protection and what I found best is nothing. Wood, tarps,
sheeting, fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another.
Nothing works well enough for me. We get about 48" of snow on a
typical winter, but rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. It
falls right off the logs when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood.


That reminded me of my daughters first residence in Ticonderoga NY. Open
stacks of wood with a very consistent silver gray appearance. Sun and
wind worked well.

Unfortunately my lot has tall pines, oaks, and maples contributing both
shade and debris.
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On 5/22/2011 2:30 AM, harry wrote:
On May 21, 9:52 pm, wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.

At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.

Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?

Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. Anyone use them for
similar projects?


The best thing I ever had for drying wood is a polytunnel. Dunno what
you call them in America but there's pix here. They are intended for
horticulture.

http://www.citadelpolytunnels.com/

There is a door in each end so ventilation can be controlled and it
gets very hot inside on sunny days and drys the wood out really fast.
Also because there's a door at each end, the wood can be used in
rotation.
The plastic sheet lasts around ten years and can be fixed with tape if
it gets ripped accidently.
Best located in the sun to speed drying.


We colonists call them greenhouses for some odd reason, even though the
darn things aren't green. Some may call them hothouses because of what
happens when the structures are sealed up when the Sun is shining. The
pseudointellectual crowd may call them conservatories to impress you. :-)

TDD
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On May 22, 4:06*am, Jim wrote:
On Sat, 21 May 2011 23:22:12 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. *I've tried various
methods of protection and *what I found best is nothing. *Wood, tarps,
sheeting, fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another.
Nothing works well enough for me. * We get about 48" of snow on a
typical winter, but rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. *It
falls right off the logs when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood..


That reminded me of my daughters first residence in Ticonderoga NY. *Open
stacks of wood with a very consistent silver gray appearance. *Sun and
wind worked well.

Unfortunately my lot has tall pines, oaks, and maples contributing both
shade and debris.


Sunshine on a pile of wood is grossly overrated for helping it dry.
Air movement through the stack is 90% or more of the drying. Given a
choice between full sun and good air circulation I will put my stack
into full shade if needed to get the 'air'.

Harry K


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On May 22, 4:06*am, Jim wrote:
On Sat, 21 May 2011 23:22:12 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. *I've tried various
methods of protection and *what I found best is nothing. *Wood, tarps,
sheeting, fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another.
Nothing works well enough for me. * We get about 48" of snow on a
typical winter, but rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. *It
falls right off the logs when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood..


That reminded me of my daughters first residence in Ticonderoga NY. *Open
stacks of wood with a very consistent silver gray appearance. *Sun and
wind worked well.

Unfortunately my lot has tall pines, oaks, and maples contributing both
shade and debris.


Good point about the debris. I am currently burning 17 year old Black
Locust that was stacked under a Horse Chestnut. Mucho, mucho crap on
top of the ricks and it filters down layer by layer as I remove wood.

Harry K
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"Ed Pawlowski" wrote

I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. I've tried various methods
of protection and what I found best is nothing. Wood, tarps, sheeting,
fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another. Nothing
works well enough for me. We get about 48" of snow on a typical winter,
but rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. It falls right off
the logs when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood.


What's the weather going to be like today for you, Ed? You know it will
probably be different here.

We get snow here in the winter, but the climate is warmer, so we get more
rain. And rain that then changes to ice. So, wood sitting out does tend to
get ice covered.

Good wood that is dried will burn, and the snow and ice will fall off of it.
It will even split and burn wet, and you can see that the water only
penetrates a little.

Still, for me, and where I live, after spending four winters here now, I am
electing to build a rack to hold my wood now that I have built a 25' x 12'
metal awning on that end of the garage that will keep the wood nice and dry.

Just like the weather is different, the reasons people may want to build a
small structure or rack or whatever varies. Some want to for aesthetic
reasons, some to just get it out of the mud and into a move convenient
location. There is no right answer to this, and everyone has different
weather.

Steve


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"willshak" wrote in message
m...
Steve B wrote the following:
Green tarps over a wood pile will only last a few months due to
chaffing. And I've never found any made to a size that fit my wood
pile.

reply:

When I want to go get wood, I don't want to pull off a tarp with a foot
of snow on it, or is sopping wet. It's windy, it's sleeting, it's cold.
I don't want to spend any more time than I need to fetch some wood. And
I sure don't want to wrestle with a sodden tarp.

How anyone cannot grasp that a tarp cover for a wood pile is a weak idea
is beyond me.

Or they don't use wood to heat.

Steve


Just asking. Don't get your panties in a knot.
It's not like asking where to get a star drill.
Didn't you killfile me after that exchange?

--

Bill


Yes, I did, but you know that when you get a new computer you have to go
back and do it all over again. Or just kill the offender when they raise
their ugly head again.

BANG!


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"aemeijers" wrote

The better and closer roof you put over the wood, the more likely things
(that you don't want in the house) will make a home in the stack.


Granted, and if you make the structure with room around the wood like you
propose, you can spray without getting spray on the wood.


I'm not convinced using (purchased) wood as a main heat source makes
financial sense


In OUR house, and I am only speaking for myself, it makes a very large
difference in heating costs for a couple of reasons. One is that wood
permits are cheap, and we get wood for $4 a cord. The other is that we have
a very good wood stove, housing insulation, and room arrangement.

At the end of last winter, we ran out of wood, and noticed a big spike in
the electric bill.



The privacy screen around an old pit toilet at a
state park beach comes to mind.


Exactly, of if you can't go that big, at least leave enough room for
circulation, and so that you can spray around the outsides of the wood and
on the floor without getting the poison on the wood.

Steve



--
aem sends...



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On May 22, 1:09*pm, The Daring Dufas
wrote:
On 5/22/2011 2:30 AM, harry wrote:





On May 21, 9:52 pm, *wrote:
In need of creating a roof of sorts for a firewood rack. *Trying to find
that happy median between durability and cost.


At the moment I'm leaning towards 3/4x4x8 BC pine plywood. *This will be
covered by green tarps of which I have many.


Is there a different type of plywood or panel I should consider instead?


Also curious about corrugated plastic roof panels. *Anyone use them for
similar projects?


The best thing I ever had for drying wood is a polytunnel. *Dunno what
you call them in America but there's pix here. *They are intended for
horticulture.


http://www.citadelpolytunnels.com/


There is a door in each end so ventilation can be controlled and it
gets very hot inside on sunny days and drys the wood out really fast.
Also because there's a door at each end, the wood can be used in
rotation.
The plastic sheet lasts around ten years and can be fixed with tape if
it gets ripped accidently.
Best located in the sun to speed drying.


We colonists call them greenhouses for some odd reason, even though the
darn things aren't green. Some may call them hothouses because of what
happens when the structures are sealed up when the Sun is shining. The
pseudointellectual crowd may call them conservatories to impress you. :-)

TDD- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


We too call greenhouses greenhouses. But the plastic tunnels on metal
hoops we call polytunnels to make the distinction. They have some
advantages and some disadvantages.
The main advantage being they are less then half the price of a
conventional greenhouse. You can get huge ones, they are about one
tenth the price.


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Default Wood rack cover

On May 22, 3:20*pm, "Steve B" wrote:
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote

I've burned wood for 25 of the last 30 years. *I've tried various methods
of protection and *what I found best is nothing. *Wood, tarps, sheeting,
fiberglass, tin roofing are all a PITA in one way or another. *Nothing
works well enough for me. * We get about 48" of snow on a typical winter,
but rarely do I have snow covered wood to bring in. *It falls right off
the logs when you handle them, unlike sheets of plywood.


What's the weather going to be like today for you, Ed? *You know it will
probably be different here.

We get snow here in the winter, but the climate is warmer, so we get more
rain. *And rain that then changes to ice. *So, wood sitting out does tend to
get ice covered.

Good wood that is dried will burn, and the snow and ice will fall off of it.
It will even split and burn wet, and you can see that the water only
penetrates a little.

Still, for me, and where I live, after spending four winters here now, I am
electing to build a rack to hold my wood now that I have built a 25' x 12'
metal awning on that end of the garage that will keep the wood nice and dry.

Just like the weather is different, the reasons people may want to build a
small structure or rack or whatever varies. *Some want to for aesthetic
reasons, some to just get it out of the mud and into a move convenient
location. *There is no right answer to this, and everyone has different
weather.

Steve


Absolutely vital to dry wood out before burning. It takes heat to
evaporate all that water, heat that you could otherwise use to warm
the house.
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