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Old July 3rd 20, 02:10 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 17:29:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
wrote:

on Thu, 02 Jul 2020 16:29:10 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:

this part of the shop has studs on 24" centers,


2 x 4 24 inch centers supporting a loft & roof ?
.... ok if you say so.


Yep. Made it myself.


I believe you described this edifice as a "shed", by which I assume
you mean as in "shed to store a lawn mower" rather than "shed to store
the Hindenberg". What are the actual dimensions? It makes a
difference in how much load everything has to support. And how much
if any snow do you usually get? That also makes a difference.

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Old July 3rd 20, 06:27 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Fri, 03 Jul 2020 00:53:24 -0400, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 23:02:18 -0400, J. Clarke
wrote:

On Thu, 2 Jul 2020 20:49:32 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 7/2/2020 8:10 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 17:29:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
wrote:

on Thu, 02 Jul 2020 16:29:10 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:

this part of the shop has studs on 24" centers,


2 x 4 24 inch centers supporting a loft & roof ?
.... ok if you say so.

Yep. Made it myself.

I believe you described this edifice as a "shed", by which I assume
you mean as in "shed to store a lawn mower" rather than "shed to store
the Hindenberg". What are the actual dimensions? It makes a
difference in how much load everything has to support. And how much
if any snow do you usually get? That also makes a difference.

UBC tables link...
https://up.codes/viewer/los_angeles/ca-residential-code-2016/chapter/6/wall-construction#R602.3

Can get by w/ 2x4 OC for roof-ceiling assembly or attic assembly only.
If attic, can only be 32-ft span.

Any more would need 16 OC to meet code.


A typical "shed" is not subject to code in most localities you know.


If it's over 100 or 120 square feet or has water (or in some cases
even electricity) it needs a building permit and needs to meet a
minimum "code" (needs an engineering pass)


Ours is 108 sq. ft. 9 x 12 OK
10 x 12 = need a building permit.
John T.



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Old July 3rd 20, 06:51 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Fri, 03 Jul 2020 00:53:24 -0400, Clare Snyder
wrote:

On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 23:02:18 -0400, J. Clarke
wrote:

On Thu, 2 Jul 2020 20:49:32 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 7/2/2020 8:10 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 17:29:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
wrote:

on Thu, 02 Jul 2020 16:29:10 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:

this part of the shop has studs on 24" centers,


2 x 4 24 inch centers supporting a loft & roof ?
.... ok if you say so.

Yep. Made it myself.

I believe you described this edifice as a "shed", by which I assume
you mean as in "shed to store a lawn mower" rather than "shed to store
the Hindenberg". What are the actual dimensions? It makes a
difference in how much load everything has to support. And how much
if any snow do you usually get? That also makes a difference.

UBC tables link...
https://up.codes/viewer/los_angeles/ca-residential-code-2016/chapter/6/wall-construction#R602.3

Can get by w/ 2x4 OC for roof-ceiling assembly or attic assembly only.
If attic, can only be 32-ft span.

Any more would need 16 OC to meet code.


A typical "shed" is not subject to code in most localities you know.

If it's over 100 or 120 square feet or has water (or in some cases
even electricity) it needs a building permit and needs to meet a
minimum "code" (needs an engineering pass)


And does that describe typical sheds?

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Old July 3rd 20, 01:23 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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On 7/2/2020 10:02 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
....

A typical "shed" is not subject to code in most localities you know.


I'd wager that isn't necessarily so, but the point isn't/wasn't whether
the particular is or isn't subject to Code.

It's at least reasonable to check on what UBC says is minimum just for
knowing whether one decides to follow or not.

Does sound somewhat skimpy depending upon just what it actually does
consist of in the upper "loft".

--



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Old July 3rd 20, 03:33 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Fri, 3 Jul 2020 07:23:59 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 7/2/2020 10:02 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
...

A typical "shed" is not subject to code in most localities you know.


I'd wager that isn't necessarily so, but the point isn't/wasn't whether
the particular is or isn't subject to Code.

It's at least reasonable to check on what UBC says is minimum just for
knowing whether one decides to follow or not.

Does sound somewhat skimpy depending upon just what it actually does
consist of in the upper "loft".


Personally I'm an engineer--I'm happy to do my own stress analysis.

But the fact is that none of us have enough information to answer the
question and so we should be asking for that information, not shooting
from the hip and giving answers that may be ludicrously
overconservative or may be dangerous depending on what he is actually
describing.

This is a "shed":
https://www.dday-overlord.com/en/battle-of-normandy/cities/ecausseville/airship-shed
So is this:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/A6D5y0SCQAAktVs?format=jpg&name=medium

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Old July 3rd 20, 03:33 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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On Friday, July 3, 2020 at 12:53:27 AM UTC-4, Clare Snyder wrote:
On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 23:02:18 -0400, J. Clarke
wrote:

On Thu, 2 Jul 2020 20:49:32 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 7/2/2020 8:10 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
On Thu, 02 Jul 2020 17:29:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
wrote:

on Thu, 02 Jul 2020 16:29:10 -0400 typed in
rec.woodworking the following:

this part of the shop has studs on 24" centers,


2 x 4 24 inch centers supporting a loft & roof ?
.... ok if you say so.

Yep. Made it myself.

I believe you described this edifice as a "shed", by which I assume
you mean as in "shed to store a lawn mower" rather than "shed to store
the Hindenberg". What are the actual dimensions? It makes a
difference in how much load everything has to support. And how much
if any snow do you usually get? That also makes a difference.

UBC tables link...
https://up.codes/viewer/los_angeles/ca-residential-code-2016/chapter/6/wall-construction#R602.3

Can get by w/ 2x4 OC for roof-ceiling assembly or attic assembly only.
If attic, can only be 32-ft span.

Any more would need 16 OC to meet code.


A typical "shed" is not subject to code in most localities you know.

If it's over 100 or 120 square feet or has water (or in some cases
even electricity) it needs a building permit and needs to meet a
minimum "code" (needs an engineering pass)


I assume that you are talking about your justification, not making a
all-encompassing statement. The codes are stricter in my town. Don't
even get me started on fence codes. Whoops too late...

The code in my town is 6' up until the back line of the house, 4' along
the side and no fence past the front the line of the house. Corner lots
have to go through an exception process.

In my case I have an addition on the back of the house. It's half as wide
as the house and situated on the east side. The house to west of mine was
built on the rear of the lot, so they only have a front yard, no back yard.
It's also much smaller than mine (used to be a guest cottage). So basically,
the view from my back yard, looking west, is the side of the cottage and
part of their front yard.

I went to the town for a fence permit so I could put a fence on the west property line. A 6' foot fence in my back yard would add privacy, especially
for the portion of their front yard that runs alongside my back yard. After
all, in theory, a fence should add privacy between the parts of the lots
where people hang out.

However, the town, in their infinite wisdom, stuck to their code and said
that the back line of my house is the back line of the addition on the east
side of the house, therefore I had to drop the fence on the west to 4' at
that line. In other words, the rear part of my backyard could have a 6'
fence, but the front could only have a 4' fence. Basically, there would
be no real privacy between my back yard and the neighboring front yard,
which is essentially their back yard, from a "hanging out" perspective.

I waited a year, then put up a 6' fence all the way to *front* line of my
house, no permit. That blocks most of the neighbor's hang out area. It's
been 25 years and no complaints.
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Old July 3rd 20, 07:32 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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On 7/3/2020 9:33 AM, J. Clarke wrote:
On Fri, 3 Jul 2020 07:23:59 -0500, dpb wrote:

On 7/2/2020 10:02 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
...

A typical "shed" is not subject to code in most localities you know.


I'd wager that isn't necessarily so, but the point isn't/wasn't whether
the particular is or isn't subject to Code.

It's at least reasonable to check on what UBC says is minimum just for
knowing whether one decides to follow or not.

Does sound somewhat skimpy depending upon just what it actually does
consist of in the upper "loft".


Personally I'm an engineer--I'm happy to do my own stress analysis.

....

So'm I...but he's done gone and one what has done and certainly posting
link to the UBC tables isn't recommending doing something.

The one recommendation I did give would be stronger that what he started
with whether it's up to Code or not it wouldn't be worse than existing.

--



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