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Default Went the day well?

After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced, because
the roads in that film look like rolled gravel.

Tyrley, same village as in Goodnight Mr Tom and
as in The Vicar of Dibley.


I find these B&W pre-1950 films to be an interesting
record of real life before plastic and electronics
turned everything make-believe

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On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced,


Try searching, it's not that hard.

Something like:
when did roads become tarmacked in uk

should tell you.

HTH
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"Richard" wrote in message
...
On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced,


Try searching, it's not that hard.

Something like:
when did roads become tarmacked in uk

should tell you.


Nope

didn't find it

I can find out from the technical pov, when it was first possible to tarmac
roads

but I cant find, what I believe the OP is looking for (and which I myself
have also thought about when seeing similarly aged films), when the
country's finances were sound enough for us to actual afford to tarmac all
roads

tim



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Default Went the day well?

When we moved in here the roads around the estate were just concrete slabs
with joins, it was in the 60s that they made them tarmac.
Many roads were also as you say, a kind of fine gravel baked into some kind
of tar, and come the frosts of winter it was like walking on ball bearings!

Brian

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"gareth evans" wrote in message
...
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced, because
the roads in that film look like rolled gravel.

Tyrley, same village as in Goodnight Mr Tom and
as in The Vicar of Dibley.


I find these B&W pre-1950 films to be an interesting
record of real life before plastic and electronics
turned everything make-believe



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Default Went the day well?

On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced, because
the roads in that film look like rolled gravel.

Tyrley, same village as in Goodnight Mr Tom and
as in The Vicar of Dibley.


I find these B&W pre-1950 films to be an interesting
record of real life before plastic and electronics
turned everything make-believe


Look up tarmacadam on Wikipedia - ~200 years !

PA



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Default Went the day well?

On 18/04/2021 08:31, tim... wrote:


"Richard" wrote in message
...
On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced,


Try searching, it's not that hard.

Something like:
when did roads become tarmacked in uk

should tell you.


Nope

didn't find it

I can find out from the technical pov, when it was first possible to
tarmac roads

but I cant find, what I believe the OP is looking for (and which I
myself have also thought about when seeing similarly aged films), when
the country's finances were sound enough for us to actual afford to
tarmac all roads

tim


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roads_...United_Kingdom

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On 18/04/2021 09:10, Richard wrote:
On 18/04/2021 08:31, tim... wrote:


"Richard" wrote in message
...
On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced,

Try searching, it's not that hard.

Something like:
when did roads become tarmacked in uk

should tell you.


Nope

didn't find it

I can find out from the technical pov, when it was first possible to
tarmac roads

but I cant find, what I believe the OP is looking for (and which I
myself have also thought about when seeing similarly aged films), when
the country's finances were sound enough for us to actual afford to
tarmac all roads

tim


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roads_...United_Kingdom


https://www.igg.org.uk/gansg/00-app1/roads.htm
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On 18/04/2021 09:12, Richard wrote:
On 18/04/2021 09:10, Richard wrote:
On 18/04/2021 08:31, tim... wrote:


"Richard" wrote in message
...
On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced,

Try searching, it's not that hard.

Something like:
when did roads become tarmacked in uk

should tell you.


Nope

didn't find it

I can find out from the technical pov, when it was first possible to
tarmac roads

but I cant find, what I believe the OP is looking for (and which I
myself have also thought about when seeing similarly aged films),
when the country's finances were sound enough for us to actual afford
to tarmac all roads

tim


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roads_...United_Kingdom


https://www.igg.org.uk/gansg/00-app1/roads.htm


http://www.ultimatedirectory.co.uk/roadhistory.htm
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On 18/04/2021 08:56, Peter Able wrote:
On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced, because
the roads in that film look like rolled gravel.

Tyrley, same village as in Goodnight Mr Tom and
as in The Vicar of Dibley.


I find these B&W pre-1950 films to be an interesting
record of real life before plastic and electronics
turned everything make-believe


Look up tarmacadam on Wikipedia - ~200 years !

PA

Indeed, but by and large 'dirt' roads of crushed stone were the norm
until well into the 20th century.

As a boy post war, most roads were tarmaced - but not all, in the country.

Whereas I think pre WWI very few were.

--
"Strange as it seems, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and
higher education positively fortifies it."

- Stephen Vizinczey

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In article ,
The Natural Philosopher wrote:
On 18/04/2021 08:56, Peter Able wrote:
On 17/04/2021 18:08, gareth evans wrote:
After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I
wonder when country roads in Brit becane tarmacced, because
the roads in that film look like rolled gravel.

Tyrley, same village as in Goodnight Mr Tom and
as in The Vicar of Dibley.


I find these B&W pre-1950 films to be an interesting
record of real life before plastic and electronics
turned everything make-believe


Look up tarmacadam on Wikipedia - ~200 years !

PA

Indeed, but by and large 'dirt' roads of crushed stone were the norm
until well into the 20th century.


As a boy post war, most roads were tarmaced - but not all, in the country.


Whereas I think pre WWI very few were.


In some parts of Scotland in the 1970s, you shad "3 ply roads".(Tarmac,
grass & tarmac again)

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle


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On Sat, 17 Apr 2021 18:08:42 +0100, gareth evans wrote:

After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I wonder when
country roads in Brit becane tarmacced, because the roads in that film
look like rolled gravel.

Tyrley, same village as in Goodnight Mr Tom and as in The Vicar of
Dibley.


I find these B&W pre-1950 films to be an interesting record of real life
before plastic and electronics turned everything make-believe


Some of the roads where I lived as a child were tarred and then rolled
with gravel. Hurts when falling off bike.
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Brian Gaff (Sofa) has brought this to us :
Many roads were also as you say, a kind of fine gravel baked into some kind
of tar, and come the frosts of winter it was like walking on ball bearings!


Up here they used a lot of cobbles on side streets, with tar between
them - lots of fun to be had in hot weather ;-)
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After serious thinking Owain Lastname wrote :
Also some motorways and main roads that were concrete with expansion joins.


The new extension of the M1 north passing a mile from here, was
originally done in concrete slab around 10/15 years ago. They were
inundated locals, complaining about the noise from the concrete rumble.
They were forced to tarmac it to reduce the noise.
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On 18/04/2021 15:03, jon wrote:
On Sat, 17 Apr 2021 18:08:42 +0100, gareth evans wrote:

After watching the re-run of this WWII film on the TV, I wonder when
country roads in Brit becane tarmacced, because the roads in that film
look like rolled gravel.

Tyrley, same village as in Goodnight Mr Tom and as in The Vicar of
Dibley.


I find these B&W pre-1950 films to be an interesting record of real life
before plastic and electronics turned everything make-believe


Some of the roads where I lived as a child were tarred and then rolled
with gravel. Hurts when falling off bike.

all the roads here are done like that

--
"The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow witted
man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest
thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly
persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid
before him."

- Leo Tolstoy

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The Natural Philosopher formulated the question :
Some of the roads where I lived as a child were tarred and then rolled
with gravel. Hurts when falling off bike.

all the roads here are done like that


They were often given a quick resurface around here like that, back in
the 60's.


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On Sun, 18 Apr 2021 14:03:13 -0000 (UTC), jon wrote:



Some of the roads where I lived as a child were tarred and then rolled
with gravel.


They still do that in Wales, certainly in Gwynedd, where they seem to
have a six week season of it in May/June.
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"Harry Bloomfield"; "Esq." wrote in message
...
After serious thinking Owain Lastname wrote :
Also some motorways and main roads that were concrete with expansion
joins.


The new extension of the M1 north passing a mile from here, was originally
done in concrete slab around 10/15 years ago. They were inundated locals,
complaining about the noise from the concrete rumble. They were forced to
tarmac it to reduce the noise.


Concrete slab roads were not just noisy for residents. There were also noisy
for drivers. I can remember driving on the A34 (*) near Oxford and for mile
after mile there was a continuous thump-thump-thump.


(*) Except in those days it was called the A43 - the road from Kidlington to
Bicester, anyway. At that time, what is now the A44 (Oxford-Banbury) was
called the A34. Confused?

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"The Natural Philosopher" wrote in message
...
Jon
Some of the roads where I lived as a child were tarred and then rolled
with gravel. Hurts when falling off bike.

all the roads here are done like that


Nowadays in the UK there are two types of road surface:

- tarmac - tar/stones pre-mixed, laid on the surface like icing and then
rolled flat

- surface dressing (what Jon describes) - tar sprayed on road, stones tipped
on top, cars left to roll them into the tar

Surface dressing would be fine if they would only use a road roller to roll
the stones into the tar, with any loose stones after that being "hoovered
up". But instead they think it is acceptable to impose very lower speed
limits (eg 20 mph on a 60 mph road) for several weeks afterwards while cars
roll some of the stones in, with the remainder being a skid hazard (hence
the draconian speed limit) until they get thrown onto the verge. Also, the
road tends to develop bald patches where all the tyres run, so they process
has to be repeated every few years.

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"NY" wrote in message
...
"The Natural Philosopher" wrote in message
...
Jon
Some of the roads where I lived as a child were tarred and then rolled
with gravel. Hurts when falling off bike.

all the roads here are done like that


Nowadays in the UK there are two types of road surface:

- tarmac - tar/stones pre-mixed, laid on the surface like icing and then
rolled flat

- surface dressing (what Jon describes) - tar sprayed on road, stones
tipped on top, cars left to roll them into the tar

Surface dressing would be fine if they would only use a road roller to
roll the stones into the tar, with any loose stones after that being
"hoovered up". But instead they think it is acceptable to impose very
lower speed limits (eg 20 mph on a 60 mph road) for several weeks
afterwards while cars roll some of the stones in, with the remainder being
a skid hazard (hence the draconian speed limit) until they get thrown onto
the verge.


We dont have any change in speed limit when doing it without
a road roller and that works fine. And the excess doesnt end up
on the verge it ends up in the gutter and is collected from there.

Also, the road tends to develop bald patches where all the tyres run, so
they process has to be repeated every few years.


We dont get that here, not sure why.

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In message , NY writes
(*) Except in those days it was called the A43 - the road from
Kidlington to Bicester, anyway. At that time, what is now the A44
(Oxford-Banbury) was called the A34. Confused?


No :-) Road numbers have changed a lot over the years, have a look at
the original (1920s) route of the A42 and the A66 as but two examples.

However, looking at my early 1970s AA road atlas, the Oxford - Banbury
road was the A423, the A34 was the Oxford - Stratford (almost via
Chipping Norton), and the A44 was started where it left the A34 (near
Chipping Norton), and headed in a generally westward direction.

According to Open Street Map, the A44 now runs from Oxford over the
route of the former A34, and from Chipping Norton, the old A34 is now
the A3400. Oxford - Banbury is now the A4260.

Adrian
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In message ,
Owain Lastname writes
On Sunday, 18 April 2021 at 11:26:37 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
As a boy post war, most roads were tarmaced - but not all, in the country.
Whereas I think pre WWI very few were.


I vaguely remember gravel roads occasionally in Hampshire, possibly in
the New Forest, in the 70s?


Huh! I remember getting 5 cycle punctures in one week after a lane I
used on my way to school was re-surfaced with bitumen and crushed stone
chippings. '58/'59 or so. Common here for little used lanes to have a
grass strip down the middle.

Also some motorways and main roads that were concrete with expansion joins.

One of the older family friends (honorary uncle) said one of the main
differences in his lifetime was the widespread tarmac roads and the
absence of dust.

Owain


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In article ,
Tim Lamb wrote:
In message ,
Owain Lastname writes
On Sunday, 18 April 2021 at 11:26:37 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
As a boy post war, most roads were tarmaced - but not all, in the country.
Whereas I think pre WWI very few were.


I vaguely remember gravel roads occasionally in Hampshire, possibly in
the New Forest, in the 70s?


Huh! I remember getting 5 cycle punctures in one week after a lane I
used on my way to school was re-surfaced with bitumen and crushed stone
chippings. '58/'59 or so. Common here for little used lanes to have a
grass strip down the middle.


Thats's what I called "Three ply" earlier in the thread.

Also some motorways and main roads that were concrete with expansion
joins.

One of the older family friends (honorary uncle) said one of the main
differences in his lifetime was the widespread tarmac roads and the
absence of dust.

Owain


--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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On 18/04/2021 16:08, Harry Bloomfield wrote:
The Natural Philosopher formulated the question :
Some of the roads where I lived as a child were tarred and then rolled
with gravel. Hurts when falling off bike.

all the roads here are done like that


They were often given a quick resurface around here like that, back in
the 60's.


Was done here about 10 years ago ... with no repairs to the problems
that the road already had first!

They also told everyone, by flyer, that the road would be closed for a
full four day period, as they would be working on it - phoning up and
explaining that my wife was disabled, we had three young children and I
have badly arthritic knees, so getting our week's shopping and the
children from the next street to our house would be a problem, revealed
that they only needed the road clear for a single morning!
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On 18/04/2021 21:22, charles wrote:
In ,
Tim wrote:
Huh! I remember getting 5 cycle punctures in one week after a lane I
used on my way to school was re-surfaced with bitumen and crushed stone
chippings. '58/'59 or so. Common here for little used lanes to have a
grass strip down the middle.

Thats's what I called "Three ply" earlier in the thread.


Oh. I assumed you meant tarmac that had been allowed to grass over, then
a new layer on top!

I've seen lanes like that, and often there is tarmac under the grass.

Andy


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In article ,
Vir Campestris wrote:
On 18/04/2021 21:22, charles wrote:
In ,
Tim wrote:
Huh! I remember getting 5 cycle punctures in one week after a lane I
used on my way to school was re-surfaced with bitumen and crushed stone
chippings. '58/'59 or so. Common here for little used lanes to have a
grass strip down the middle.

Thats's what I called "Three ply" earlier in the thread.


Oh. I assumed you meant tarmac that had been allowed to grass over, then
a new layer on top!


I've seen lanes like that, and often there is tarmac under the grass.


Andy


lanes are fine, but A roads?

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
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On 21/04/2021 08:57, charles wrote:
In article ,
Vir Campestris wrote:
On 18/04/2021 21:22, charles wrote:
In ,
Tim wrote:
Huh! I remember getting 5 cycle punctures in one week after a lane I
used on my way to school was re-surfaced with bitumen and crushed stone
chippings. '58/'59 or so. Common here for little used lanes to have a
grass strip down the middle.
Thats's what I called "Three ply" earlier in the thread.


Oh. I assumed you meant tarmac that had been allowed to grass over, then
a new layer on top!


I've seen lanes like that, and often there is tarmac under the grass.


Andy


lanes are fine, but A roads?

Lanes in Scotland are called 'A' roads


--
€śProgress is precisely that which rules and regulations did not foresee,€ť

€“ Ludwig von Mises
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