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Old September 11th 19, 01:57 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

On 11/09/2019 07.00, The Real Bev wrote:
On 09/10/2019 09:16 PM, micky wrote:

Word recognition won, by the time I started first grade...


That's what the LA schools (and probably everybody else) used.* When we
read aloud I thought that we were supposed to do it with big pauses
between the words like all the other kids did.* It seemed dumb, but if
that was the way it was supposed to be done...


My mother was a "toddler" teacher. Her successes getting kids to read
were much better than the rest. The method she used was a mixture of the
old classic and new ones - but as this is Spain, they do not apply to
English. She used figures of things that sounded similar to each
syllable or letter (I don't remember which), each figure in a card. The
kids had to put the figures on top of the corresponding letter (or
syllable). The other method she used was to read, a kid a time, from a
special book that had combinations of letters in appropriate order (La
Cartilla). This is a lot of effort for the teacher, one kid a time, and
all kids, each one at his/her own pace.

What she said, is that most kids had a day when they suddenly discovered
that the words joined in phrases and that they meant things. At that
instant they started to read everything they could and enjoy it a lot.
She said it was a wondrous moment of joy to see, and we supposed, for
the kids. Their faces were amazing.


However, I remember some of my pals at school read haltingly.


Needless to say, that was NOT how we taught our kids to read.* We
figured it was too important to let the school muck it up so we did it
ourselves.



--
Cheers, Carlos.

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Old September 11th 19, 02:25 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 00:16:56 -0400, micky
wrote:

alt.home.repair added. Best to reply to this one.


OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

I heard a very interesting radio show tonight, and apparently the same
fight about how to teach reading, that was going on at least since 1951
is still going on.


When I was 5, in 1952, (and of course they'd been debating it at the
board of education for months or years before that), there was a contest
between what was then called "Word recognition" and phonetics. Later
these were known as whole word and phonics, and probably other names
too.

Word recognition won, by the time I started first grade, but our first
grade teacher, Miss Maxwell was 64 and entering her last year of
teaching. She was not inclined to learn something new (which she
probably had doubts about anyhow), so we learned phonetically.
Everyone of us could read before we left for Xmas vacation, including
the 2 girls who never knew the answer to questions. (and the one who
stuttered, though I don't really think the two are related.)


Since then, a 3rd choice has reared its head, 3 cueing systems, where
the reader tries to figure out the word from context: semantic,
syntactic and graphophonic cues. I don't know what those words mean.
On the radio they talked about the rest of the text, pictures, and
something else. Did any of you get taught with a 3 cueing system?


I taught my son the alphabet because he was curious and asked.
Next thing he was asking me what "Japan" and "suicide" meant. He knew
how to pronounce the words, but not what they meant. He had just
turned 2. I had to turn the newspaper pages for him, they were too
big.
At 3 he wrote a short story on the computer about dinosaurs
and an "egg war" (I still have it). Not very good reading..... he was
more focused on inventing new names for each dinosaur than the story
itself. After that he became more interested in bicycles than reading
which was a relief.
At seven he had leukemia (which relapsed), both treated with
heavy brain radiation (+ quimo). Radiation is no longer in the
protocol. Fsck the equipment manufacturers that lobbied for the
radiation protocol.
He's an "average" (IQ 130) computer programmer now.
Dunno if there's a moral to the story. Capacity/interest of
the pupil probably trumps teaching method?
[]'s

PS In Portuguese, words are pronounced as they are written. No
"read and read" here. In Portuguese they would be "red and reed".
Easier, huh?

--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
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Old September 11th 19, 02:51 PM posted to alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

On 09/11/2019 05:38 AM, SC Tom wrote:


"micky" wrote in message
...
alt.home.repair added. Best to reply to this one.


OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?


I'm a year older than you. My father was military, so we moved around
quite a bit. My mother taught me to read before I even started school
(she was an RN, and had the patience, I guess, LOL), but I would assume
it was probably phonetics and word recognition.

I sat my girls on my lap and read to them, and eventually had them
reading out loud along with me, and they were both reading before
starting school (2 years apart). Granted, not at a middle school level,
but I would say probably at an early 2nd grade level. I assume that
would also be the phonetics and word recognition method.


I learned by the lap method too. My father would read the funny sheets
and books to me. One day he was busy so I started reading one of my
favorite books. My parents thought I was just playing until they asked
me to read it out loud.

Word recognition, I guess, but I really don't know. I do recall the
'Look, Dick, see Spot' literature was intensely boring.

There were a lot of books around the house and I read anything I could
lay my hands on including Frank Yerby's 'The Foxes of Harrow'. Loved the
book although it raised some questions about how I could correctly use
'octoroon' in seventh grade. Persons of color were more finely
categorized back then.
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Old September 11th 19, 02:57 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

On 09/11/2019 07:25 AM, Shadow wrote:
PS In Portuguese, words are pronounced as they are written. No
"read and read" here. In Portuguese they would be "red and reed".
Easier, huh?


Although it's rusty my other language is German. It is also
straightforward in pronunciation. The challenge is the fondness for
compound words but once you figure out which words were pasted together
you can pronounce it.

English is a mongrel language, a product of diversity.
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Old September 11th 19, 03:19 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

"rbowman" wrote in message
...
On 09/11/2019 07:25 AM, Shadow wrote:
PS In Portuguese, words are pronounced as they are written. No
"read and read" here. In Portuguese they would be "red and reed".
Easier, huh?


Although it's rusty my other language is German. It is also
straightforward in pronunciation. The challenge is the fondness for
compound words but once you figure out which words were pasted together
you can pronounce it.


I remember learning German compound words such as Luftkissenfahrzeug
(hovercraft - "air cushion travel thing") and Fernsehapparat (TV - "far see
apparatus"). My grandpa was a member of a model railway society and they had
dealings with a similar society in Germany. They sent my grandpa (who was
editor of his society's newsletter) a ****-take of their own language, as a
story in "German" with English translation. The word that they translated as
"cab" was "Herrlokomotivdirektordonnerundblitzenhaus". So Germans *do* have
a sense of humour after all.



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Old September 11th 19, 03:52 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

NY wrote:
[...]
I remember learning German compound words such as Luftkissenfahrzeug
(hovercraft - "air cushion travel thing") and Fernsehapparat (TV - "far see
apparatus"). My grandpa was a member of a model railway society and they had
dealings with a similar society in Germany. They sent my grandpa (who was
editor of his society's newsletter) a ****-take of their own language, as a
story in "German" with English translation. The word that they translated as
"cab" was "Herrlokomotivdirektordonnerundblitzenhaus". So Germans *do* have
a sense of humour after all.


You mean like:

Leichtmetallhochdrukdampfkochkesselmitautomatische mshreianlage

(kettle with a whistle)

Eisenbahnknotenpunkthinundhersteller

(the person who changes the switches in a railway track)

Ineinemverdecktenkastenaufgestellte....

(Can't remember the rest, but it's a souffleur in a theatre.)

No, I'm *not* German! :-)
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Old September 11th 19, 05:14 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

"Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:
[...]
I remember learning German compound words such as Luftkissenfahrzeug
(hovercraft - "air cushion travel thing") and Fernsehapparat (TV - "far
see
apparatus"). My grandpa was a member of a model railway society and they
had
dealings with a similar society in Germany. They sent my grandpa (who was
editor of his society's newsletter) a ****-take of their own language, as
a
story in "German" with English translation. The word that they translated
as
"cab" was "Herrlokomotivdirektordonnerundblitzenhaus". So Germans *do*
have
a sense of humour after all.


You mean like:

Leichtmetallhochdrukdampfkochkesselmitautomatische mshreianlage

(kettle with a whistle)

Eisenbahnknotenpunkthinundhersteller

(the person who changes the switches in a railway track)

Ineinemverdecktenkastenaufgestellte....

(Can't remember the rest, but it's a souffleur in a theatre.)

No, I'm *not* German! :-)


I've often thought that it must make a typesetter's job a nightmare,
especially when full-justifying text in narrow newspaper columns ;-) The
first one would take several lines of hyphenated text.

I'm sure a lot of the longest ones are not in common use. I was rather
miffed, after learning Luftkissenfahrzeug, to discover that Germans usually
use das Hovercraft.


I remember many years ago in an edition of the Guinness Book of Records,
under the section "longest word", that the record was a Fijiian word which
translated as "Father-in-law, don't look now, I'm bending over". It is their
word for... mini-skirt ;-) Yeah, right. I'm sure it is.

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Old September 11th 19, 05:36 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

On 9/11/2019 12:14 PM, NY wrote:
"Frank Slootweg" wrote in message
...
NY wrote:
[...]
I remember learning German compound words such as Luftkissenfahrzeug
(hovercraft - "air cushion travel thing") and Fernsehapparat (TV -
"far see
apparatus"). My grandpa was a member of a model railway society and
they had
dealings with a similar society in Germany. They sent my grandpa (who
was
editor of his society's newsletter) a ****-take of their own
language, as a
story in "German" with English translation. The word that they
translated as
"cab" was "Herrlokomotivdirektordonnerundblitzenhaus". So Germans
*do* have
a sense of humour after all.


*You mean like:

Leichtmetallhochdrukdampfkochkesselmitautomatische mshreianlage

(kettle with a whistle)

Eisenbahnknotenpunkthinundhersteller

(the person who changes the switches in a railway track)

Ineinemverdecktenkastenaufgestellte....

(Can't remember the rest, but it's a souffleur in a theatre.)

No, I'm *not* German! :-)


I've often thought that it must make a typesetter's job a nightmare,
especially when full-justifying text in narrow newspaper columns ;-)
The first one would take several lines of hyphenated text.

I'm sure a lot of the longest ones are not in common use. I was rather
miffed, after learning Luftkissenfahrzeug, to discover that Germans
usually use das Hovercraft.


I remember many years ago in an edition of the Guinness Book of Records,
under the section "longest word", that the record was a Fijiian word
which translated as "Father-in-law, don't look now, I'm bending over".
It is their word for... mini-skirt ;-) Yeah, right. I'm sure it is.


Leave it to Wiki to have an article on the world's longest words:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_words

No mention of Fijian.

I concur as a retired chemist that the longest words would be chemical
names.

I had also studied German when studying chemistry and while I am not
fluent in it, I did publish a short communication in a German journal.
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Old September 11th 19, 06:29 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

On 9/11/2019 12:16 AM, micky wrote:
alt.home.repair added. Best to reply to this one.


OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

I heard a very interesting radio show tonight, and apparently the same
fight about how to teach reading, that was going on at least since 1951
is still going on.


When I was 5, in 1952, (and of course they'd been debating it at the
board of education for months or years before that), there was a contest
between what was then called "Word recognition" and phonetics. Later
these were known as whole word and phonics, and probably other names
too.

Word recognition won, by the time I started first grade, but our first
grade teacher, Miss Maxwell was 64 and entering her last year of
teaching. She was not inclined to learn something new (which she
probably had doubts about anyhow), so we learned phonetically.
Everyone of us could read before we left for Xmas vacation, including
the 2 girls who never knew the answer to questions. (and the one who
stuttered, though I don't really think the two are related.)


Since then, a 3rd choice has reared its head, 3 cueing systems, where
the reader tries to figure out the word from context: semantic,
syntactic and graphophonic cues. I don't know what those words mean.
On the radio they talked about the rest of the text, pictures, and
something else. Did any of you get taught with a 3 cueing system?


First grade in 1950. Phonics and the Dick and Jane readers.

See Spot run.
Run Spot, run.
Jane likes Dick. Jane was a slut.
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Old September 11th 19, 07:44 PM posted to comp.mobile.android,alt.home.repair
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Default OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...
On 9/11/2019 12:16 AM, micky wrote:
alt.home.repair added. Best to reply to this one.


OT How old are you and how were you taught to read?

I heard a very interesting radio show tonight, and apparently the same
fight about how to teach reading, that was going on at least since 1951
is still going on.


When I was 5, in 1952, (and of course they'd been debating it at the
board of education for months or years before that), there was a contest
between what was then called "Word recognition" and phonetics. Later
these were known as whole word and phonics, and probably other names
too.

Word recognition won, by the time I started first grade, but our first
grade teacher, Miss Maxwell was 64 and entering her last year of
teaching. She was not inclined to learn something new (which she
probably had doubts about anyhow), so we learned phonetically.
Everyone of us could read before we left for Xmas vacation, including
the 2 girls who never knew the answer to questions. (and the one who
stuttered, though I don't really think the two are related.)


Since then, a 3rd choice has reared its head, 3 cueing systems, where
the reader tries to figure out the word from context: semantic,
syntactic and graphophonic cues. I don't know what those words mean.
On the radio they talked about the rest of the text, pictures, and
something else. Did any of you get taught with a 3 cueing system?


First grade in 1950. Phonics and the Dick and Jane readers.

See Spot run.
Run Spot, run.
Jane likes Dick. Jane was a slut.


Oooh, You've introduced a new word in the last line. Expand their
vocabulary. And it's got that complicated "sl" combination :-) "Mummy,
mummy, what's a slut?"


In my case it was:

Tip is a dog. (the picture gives the game away)
Mitten is a cat. (ditto)
Tip likes Mitten. (good)
Mitten likes Tip. (ah, good, no unrequited love)



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