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Default Fence facing etiquette

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?


Yes. Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.

My brother's neighbor put up a stockade fence with the horizontals on
my brother's side. He asked his neighbor if he minded if he minded
if he used those horizontals to hang some plants on the nice
south-facing vertical surface. The neighbor was happy with his
smooth side-- my brother was happy with the easy to use horizontal
slats- and then the building inspector stopped by. He made the guy
take the fence down and switch it around! Luckily it was along a
level spot so the fence was salvageable as-is.

Jim
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Default Fence facing etiquette

On Oct 19, 5:53 am, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?


Yes. Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.

My brother's neighbor put up a stockade fence with the horizontals on
my brother's side. He asked his neighbor if he minded if he minded
if he used those horizontals to hang some plants on the nice
south-facing vertical surface. The neighbor was happy with his
smooth side-- my brother was happy with the easy to use horizontal
slats- and then the building inspector stopped by. He made the guy
take the fence down and switch it around! Luckily it was along a
level spot so the fence was salvageable as-is.

Jim


I can understand the reason for the law. In your case, you brother
didn't mind, but , if and when he sells his house, the new buyer
might. In general, ordinances for appearance are based on
what the property looks like to people who pass by, rather than
the preferences of the owner.
for instance, nobody cares if you paint the inside of the walls
pink with polka dots, but trying that on the outside will probably
result in lawsuits. While the "fence facing" is a minor thing,
it needs to follow the proper considerations for the rest of the
neighborhood, whether the present neighbors care or not.
some of them may care, but decide not to object to keep the
peace. It is for this reason that a municipal ordinance comes
into play, so the matter is settled before the fence, or whatever,
goes up. The city inspector can be the "bad guy", and the
neighbors can breathe a sigh of relief at avoiding a confrontation.
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Default Fence facing etiquette

On 10/19/2012 6:12 AM, Don Wiss wrote:
When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).


I saw it in building code (Florida or doing a Google?) as you state.
Just bought a house with fences situated that way, about 3" inside
property line according to survey. I've never given it much thought,
but looking at a home from off the property it might look rather odd to
see the back side of fence.
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Default Fence facing etiquette

Don Wiss wrote the following on 10/19/2012 6:12 AM (ET):
When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).


Yes, in some places. Maybe most places.
Besides, putting the ugly side of the fence to the outside may provide
easier access to your property by neer-do-wells using the horizontals as
a foothold.

--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
In the original Orange County. Est. 1683
To email, remove the double zeros after @


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Default Fence facing etiquette

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?


Some places. Not all, obviously. Check with your code enforcement agency, if
any.


(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).

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Default Fence facing etiquette



"Don Wiss" wrote in message
...

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).

To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW

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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:50:41 -0400, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?


Yes. Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.

My brother's neighbor put up a stockade fence with the horizontals on
my brother's side. He asked his neighbor if he minded if he minded
if he used those horizontals to hang some plants on the nice
south-facing vertical surface. The neighbor was happy with his
smooth side-- my brother was happy with the easy to use horizontal
slats- and then the building inspector stopped by. He made the guy
take the fence down and switch it around! Luckily it was along a
level spot so the fence was salvageable as-is.


He should have just given the fence to your brother. ;-)
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Default Fence facing etiquette

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 04:43:48 -0700 (PDT), Robert
wrote:

On Oct 19, 5:53 am, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?


Yes. Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.

My brother's neighbor put up a stockade fence with the horizontals on
my brother's side. He asked his neighbor if he minded if he minded
if he used those horizontals to hang some plants on the nice
south-facing vertical surface. The neighbor was happy with his
smooth side-- my brother was happy with the easy to use horizontal
slats- and then the building inspector stopped by. He made the guy
take the fence down and switch it around! Luckily it was along a
level spot so the fence was salvageable as-is.

Jim


I can understand the reason for the law. In your case, you brother
didn't mind, but , if and when he sells his house, the new buyer
might. In general, ordinances for appearance are based on
what the property looks like to people who pass by, rather than
the preferences of the owner.
for instance, nobody cares if you paint the inside of the walls
pink with polka dots, but trying that on the outside will probably
result in lawsuits. While the "fence facing" is a minor thing,
it needs to follow the proper considerations for the rest of the
neighborhood, whether the present neighbors care or not.
some of them may care, but decide not to object to keep the
peace. It is for this reason that a municipal ordinance comes
into play, so the matter is settled before the fence, or whatever,
goes up. The city inspector can be the "bad guy", and the
neighbors can breathe a sigh of relief at avoiding a confrontation.


I tend to agree, though our fence (at least on two sides) is facing us. The
builder put it there so that's the way it is.
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Default Fence facing etiquette

Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?


Yes. Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.


There are actual LAWS governing the orientation of fences?

Must suck to live in such places.

In my city, the only fence law of which I'm aware is that concertina wire
topping must be at least six feet above the ground. I'm not sure about the
rules on mines...




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On 19 Oct 2012, " wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?


Some places. Not all, obviously. Check with your code enforcement agency, if
any.


This is more of curiosity. I live in rowhouse Brooklyn. No one on the
street can see what fence once puts up in their backyards. The prior owners
of my house put up a stockade fence on one side. They faced the good side
to the neighbor. The Brit now living behind me is now putting up a fence.
He is facing the back to me. He was planning to have the posts 2 3/4" onto
my property. As only the posts would be on my property, he thought it would
be okay. I told the contractor to move them. (Only the posts are now up.)

The reason he was trying to pull this off is he has a telephone pole at the
edge of his property and he wanted to get the fence behind it. To keep all
of the fence on his property he is now going to have to stop the fence at
the pole. And then resume it on the other side.

The prior chain link fence had bent around the pole putting the pole on my
side. My a/c condenser is close to the property line. If he has the posts
partially on my property the fence will be within a couple inches and the
condenser's efficiency will be decreased. I still may move it in a bit.

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Oct 19, 5:13*am, Norminn wrote:
On 10/19/2012 6:12 AM, Don Wiss wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?


Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).


I saw it in building code (Florida or doing a Google?) as you state.
Just bought a house with fences situated that way, about 3" inside
property line according to survey. *I've never given it much thought,
but looking at a home from off the property it might look rather odd to
see the back side of fence.


Amazing that code forces your neighbor to provide 'access' in order to
properly put in that fence. Else the neighbor gets the 'ugly' side.
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On 10/19/2012 9:57 AM, Robert Macy wrote:
On Oct 19, 5:13 am, Norminn wrote:
On 10/19/2012 6:12 AM, Don Wiss wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?


Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).


I saw it in building code (Florida or doing a Google?) as you state.
Just bought a house with fences situated that way, about 3" inside
property line according to survey. I've never given it much thought,
but looking at a home from off the property it might look rather odd to
see the back side of fence.


Amazing that code forces your neighbor to provide 'access' in order to
properly put in that fence. Else the neighbor gets the 'ugly' side.


Give access? Don't know what you mean. Same principle I believe as not
being able to remove all branches of trees at the property
line....intentionally spiteful giving of the ugly treatment to neighbors )


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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:50:41 -0400, Jim Elbrecht
wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?


Yes. Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.

My brother's neighbor put up a stockade fence with the horizontals on
my brother's side. He asked his neighbor if he minded if he minded
if he used those horizontals to hang some plants on the nice
south-facing vertical surface. The neighbor was happy with his
smooth side-- my brother was happy with the easy to use horizontal
slats- and then the building inspector stopped by. He made the guy
take the fence down and switch it around! Luckily it was along a
level spot so the fence was salvageable as-is.

Jim

Could have just said he built the fence for his neighbour (your
brother) and called it a day.
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 07:17:57 -0600, "WW"
wrote:



"Don Wiss" wrote in message
.. .

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).

To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW

Putting the pretty side to the neighour's side requires working
access on the neighbour's side. And if the neighbour also puts up a
fence, pretty side to pretty side, everyone has an ugly fence., and
the second fence is going to be a real hassle to build in place.

Some pretty petty laws, as far as I'm concerned.
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On Oct 19, 12:06*pm, Norminn wrote:
On 10/19/2012 9:57 AM, Robert Macy wrote:





On Oct 19, 5:13 am, Norminn wrote:
On 10/19/2012 6:12 AM, Don Wiss wrote:


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?


Don.www.donwiss.com(e-maillink at home page bottom).


I saw it in building code (Florida or doing a Google?) as you state.
Just bought a house with fences situated that way, about 3" inside
property line according to survey. *I've never given it much thought,
but looking at a home from off the property it might look rather odd to
see the back side of fence.


Amazing that code forces your neighbor to provide 'access' in order to
properly put in that fence. Else the neighbor gets the 'ugly' side.


Give access? *Don't know what you mean. *Same principle I believe as not
being able to remove all branches of trees at the property
line....intentionally spiteful giving of the ugly treatment to neighbors )- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


I'll give that a try....

My local code allows me to put a fence right along the property line,
but the good side must face the adjoining property. When I sunk the
posts for my wooden sections, they were within a few inches of the
property line, with just enough room for the sections to be attached
to the neighbor's side of the posts, but not cross over the line.

In order to screw the panels to the posts, I had to be on the
neighbor's property. Even if I suspended myself from the tops of the
sections to screw them on, I'd still be in the neighbor's air space.

Thus, "access" to the neighbor's property is (most likely) required.

I suppose, with enough manpower and extremely good planning, you could
install the entire fence post-side-down on your property and then
stand it up and drop it down into the post holes, but backing filling
the post holes would be pretty difficult with the fence blocking the
neighbor's side of the posts. That's not a method I would like to be
involved with.

In my case, after putting up the fence, I used spare slats to cover
the butt joints where the sections were screwed to the posts. I don't
know if that was required, but I sure would want someone to do that
for me.
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On Oct 19, 9:54*am, Don Wiss wrote:
On 19 Oct 2012, " wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss wrote:


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?


Some places. Not all, obviously. *Check with your code enforcement agency, if
any.


This is more of curiosity. I live in rowhouse Brooklyn. No one on the
street can see what fence once puts up in their backyards. The prior owners
of my house put up a stockade fence on one side. They faced the good side
to the neighbor. The Brit now living behind me is now putting up a fence.
He is facing the back to me. He was planning to have the posts 2 3/4" onto
my property. As only the posts would be on my property, he thought it would
be okay. I told the contractor to move them. (Only the posts are now up.)

The reason he was trying to pull this off is he has a telephone pole at the
edge of his property and he wanted to get the fence behind it. To keep all
of the fence on his property he is now going to have to stop the fence at
the pole. And then resume it on the other side.

The prior chain link fence had bent around the pole putting the pole on my
side. My a/c condenser is close to the property line. If he has the posts
partially on my property the fence will be within a couple inches and the
condenser's efficiency will be decreased. I still may move it in a bit.

Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).


Is there some particular reason you said "The Brit now living behind
me..."?

What does his nationality have to do with putting up a fence?
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On Oct 19, 9:18*am, "WW" wrote:
"Don Wiss" *wrote in message

...

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).

To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW


That can be done with some style of fences, but certainly not all.

How do you make a stockade fence or a chain link fence or a board-on-
board fence pretty on both sides without doubling up the fence so that
the posts are sandwiched in between? That would basically double the
cost of the fencing - minus the posts.


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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:34:29 -0400, wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 07:17:57 -0600, "WW"
wrote:



"Don Wiss" wrote in message
. ..

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don.
www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).

To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW

Putting the pretty side to the neighour's side requires working
access on the neighbour's side. And if the neighbour also puts up a
fence, pretty side to pretty side, everyone has an ugly fence., and
the second fence is going to be a real hassle to build in place.


Two fences, face to face, is kinda silly, no?

Some pretty petty laws, as far as I'm concerned.


No, it's really just common sense.
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 08:20:40 -0700, Bill wrote:

In article ,
says...

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors.


Yes, same as when wearing shirts or pants, good looking side out where
people see it.


You haven't watched too many kids, these days.

Underwear does not matter!


Outside, man, outside!
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On Oct 19, 9:24*am, "HeyBub" wrote:
Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?


Yes. * *Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.


There are actual LAWS governing the orientation of fences?

Must suck to live in such places.

In my city, the only fence law of which I'm aware is that concertina wire
topping must be at least six feet above the ground. I'm not sure about the
rules on mines...


There are not only laws governing the orientation, but also the
height. In my town the fence can be 6' high from the rear property
line to the back line of the house, 4' from the back line of the house
to the front line of the house with no fence past the front line of
the house to the street.

For those with corner lots or other odd sized lots (or houses) this
can be a real problem and often requires a long drawn out exception
process. We have a friend that lives on a corner lot which has been
fenced in since before the ordinance was put into place. When a drunk
driver destroyed a large portion of the fence, he went to the town to
get permission to replace the entire fence since the remaining
sections were pretty old and wouldn't match the new sections.

The town pushed back and said that the only reason that they were
going to allow him to replace the destroyed sections was because he
was grandfathered in, but replacing the remainder was considered a new
installation and would have to meet existing codes - meaning no fence
at all. They reluctantly relented when most of the neighborhood showed
up at the board meeting and convinced them that we did not want to
look at half an old fence and half a new one. One neighbor actually
put together a photo-shopped poster of the 2 versions - making the old/
new combination look really bad - which probably helped sway the
board.
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On Oct 19, 1:16*pm, "
wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:34:29 -0400, wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 07:17:57 -0600, "WW"
wrote:


"Don Wiss" *wrote in message
. ..


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?


Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).


To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW

*Putting the pretty side to the neighour's side requires working
access on the neighbour's side. And if the neighbour also puts up a
fence, pretty side to pretty side, everyone has an ugly fence., and
the second fence is going to be a real hassle to build in place.


....

Two fences, face to face, is kinda silly, no?


Not really. My backyard is offset from the 2 yards behind me,
approximately 2/3, 1/3. The 1/3 neighbor had some nice board-on-board
fencing, the 2/3 neighbor had chain link.

I bought the same style board-on-board fence and installed it face to
face with the chain link fence to hide it, to match the other 1/3 and
to provide more privacy.

Point being, two fences, face to face, isn't silly if there's a valid
reason.


Some pretty petty laws, as far as I'm concerned.


No, it's really just common sense.


Now that, I agree with.

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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 09:55:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Oct 19, 9:54*am, Don Wiss wrote:
On 19 Oct 2012, " wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss wrote:


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?


Some places. Not all, obviously. *Check with your code enforcement agency, if
any.


This is more of curiosity. I live in rowhouse Brooklyn. No one on the
street can see what fence once puts up in their backyards. The prior owners
of my house put up a stockade fence on one side. They faced the good side
to the neighbor. The Brit now living behind me is now putting up a fence.
He is facing the back to me. He was planning to have the posts 2 3/4" onto
my property. As only the posts would be on my property, he thought it would
be okay. I told the contractor to move them. (Only the posts are now up.)

The reason he was trying to pull this off is he has a telephone pole at the
edge of his property and he wanted to get the fence behind it. To keep all
of the fence on his property he is now going to have to stop the fence at
the pole. And then resume it on the other side.

The prior chain link fence had bent around the pole putting the pole on my
side. My a/c condenser is close to the property line. If he has the posts
partially on my property the fence will be within a couple inches and the
condenser's efficiency will be decreased. I still may move it in a bit.

Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).


Is there some particular reason you said "The Brit now living behind
me..."?


What does his nationality have to do with putting up a fence?



Maybe harry moved behind him. Sounds like him, anyway.


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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 09:59:14 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Oct 19, 9:18*am, "WW" wrote:
"Don Wiss" *wrote in message

...

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).

To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW


That can be done with some style of fences, but certainly not all.

How do you make a stockade fence or a chain link fence or a board-on-
board fence pretty on both sides without doubling up the fence so that
the posts are sandwiched in between? That would basically double the
cost of the fencing - minus the posts.


Alternate pickets.
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Is there some particular reason you said "The Brit now living behind
me..."?

What does his nationality have to do with putting up a fence?


If you go back to my original post I asked if fence facing etiquette was
different in the UK. It may be.

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012, DerbyDad03 wrote:

On Oct 19, 9:18*am, "WW" wrote:
To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW


That can be done with some style of fences, but certainly not all.


It appears that is what he is doing with the sides. I can only see the
inside of the sides. See:

http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/535-2nd-Side-Fence.jpg

To those discussing access, the men have already trampled my garden. And
even if the post is fully on his side of the property line, the concrete
will spill onto my side. But I'm not gong to complain about these.

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Oct 19, 1:58*pm, Don Wiss wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012, DerbyDad03 wrote:
Is there some particular reason you said "The Brit now living behind
me..."?


What does his nationality have to do with putting up a fence?


If you go back to my original post I asked if fence facing etiquette was
different in the UK. It may be.

Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).


True dat!


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On Oct 19, 1:35*pm, "
wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 09:59:14 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:





On Oct 19, 9:18*am, "WW" wrote:
"Don Wiss" *wrote in message


. ..


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?


Don.www.donwiss.com(e-maillink at home page bottom).


To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW


That can be done with some style of fences, but certainly not all.


How do you make a stockade fence or a chain link fence or a board-on-
board fence pretty on both sides without doubling up the fence so that
the posts are sandwiched in between? That would basically double the
cost of the fencing - minus the posts.


Alternate pickets.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Alternate pickets on a chain link or stockade fence?

As I said, pretty on both sides can be accomplished fairly easily with
some fence styles, but not with all.
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 10:31:59 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Oct 19, 1:16*pm, "
wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:34:29 -0400, wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 07:17:57 -0600, "WW"
wrote:


"Don Wiss" *wrote in message
. ..


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?


Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).


To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW
*Putting the pretty side to the neighour's side requires working
access on the neighbour's side. And if the neighbour also puts up a
fence, pretty side to pretty side, everyone has an ugly fence., and
the second fence is going to be a real hassle to build in place.


...

Two fences, face to face, is kinda silly, no?


Not really. My backyard is offset from the 2 yards behind me,
approximately 2/3, 1/3. The 1/3 neighbor had some nice board-on-board
fencing, the 2/3 neighbor had chain link.

I bought the same style board-on-board fence and installed it face to
face with the chain link fence to hide it, to match the other 1/3 and
to provide more privacy.


Good grief. There is no "good side" of chain link fencing.

Point being, two fences, face to face, isn't silly if there's a valid
reason.


Different subject.

Some pretty petty laws, as far as I'm concerned.


No, it's really just common sense.


Now that, I agree with.

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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:53:23 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Oct 19, 1:35*pm, "
wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 09:59:14 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:





On Oct 19, 9:18*am, "WW" wrote:
"Don Wiss" *wrote in message


. ..


When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:


(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?


Don.www.donwiss.com(e-maillink at home page bottom).


To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW


That can be done with some style of fences, but certainly not all.


How do you make a stockade fence or a chain link fence or a board-on-
board fence pretty on both sides without doubling up the fence so that
the posts are sandwiched in between? That would basically double the
cost of the fencing - minus the posts.


Alternate pickets.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Alternate pickets on a chain link or stockade fence?


Chain link has no good side. Stockade, why not?

As I said, pretty on both sides can be accomplished fairly easily with
some fence styles, but not with all.


You can come close. A close-picket fence can be mixed pretty transparently
with a alternating pickets. A neighbor on one side replaced the fence (it was
probably "mine" but did it before I moved in) with alternating pickets. It
doesn't look that bad.
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On 19 Oct 2012, " wrote:

You can come close. A close-picket fence can be mixed pretty transparently
with a alternating pickets. A neighbor on one side replaced the fence (it was
probably "mine" but did it before I moved in) with alternating pickets. It
doesn't look that bad.


Yes. Like this one:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/Alt...cket-Fence.jpg

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 17:23:37 -0400, Don Wiss wrote:

On 19 Oct 2012, " wrote:

You can come close. A close-picket fence can be mixed pretty transparently
with a alternating pickets. A neighbor on one side replaced the fence (it was
probably "mine" but did it before I moved in) with alternating pickets. It
doesn't look that bad.


Yes. Like this one:
http://donwiss.com/pictures/misc/Alt...cket-Fence.jpg


Yeah. Sorta like that, though it looks like that one has a rail on the top
rather than pickets.

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).



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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 13:39:28 -0400, Jim Elbrecht
wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:29:23 -0400, wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:50:41 -0400, Jim Elbrecht
wrote:

On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 06:12:09 -0400, Don Wiss
wrote:

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?

Yes. Even if the neighbor *prefers* the other side.

My brother's neighbor put up a stockade fence with the horizontals on
my brother's side. He asked his neighbor if he minded if he minded
if he used those horizontals to hang some plants on the nice
south-facing vertical surface. The neighbor was happy with his
smooth side-- my brother was happy with the easy to use horizontal
slats- and then the building inspector stopped by. He made the guy
take the fence down and switch it around! Luckily it was along a
level spot so the fence was salvageable as-is.

Jim

Could have just said he built the fence for his neighbour (your
brother) and called it a day.


Not when the twit of a building inspector was measuring the distance
to the property line, too. [I think it had to be 2'- which really
crowded the guys driveway & wouldn't have bothered my brother if it
was right on the line-- but rules is rules.] The neighbor was
aware of that rule-- [and maybe the other one too, but just figured if
they were agreeable it would be OK]

Jim

So they require a 4 foot corridor between property fences???? Who mows
that? Who looks after it? And they want taxes on it too?????
Maroons er Macroons - no MORONS - that's the word I was looking for!!
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" wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 10:31:59 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Oct 19, 1:16 pm, "
wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 12:34:29 -0400, wrote:
On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 07:17:57 -0600, "WW"
wrote:

"Don Wiss" wrote in message
...

When I was young I learned that fence facing etiquette is to have the
pretty side of the fence facing outward towards your neighbors. My
questions:

(1) Is this a law in places?
(2) Is this the same etiquette in the UK?

Don.www.donwiss.com(e-mail link at home page bottom).

To avoid any problems with code or neighbor, make both sides pretty. that is
what I would do. WW
Putting the pretty side to the neighour's side requires working
access on the neighbour's side. And if the neighbour also puts up a
fence, pretty side to pretty side, everyone has an ugly fence., and
the second fence is going to be a real hassle to build in place.


...

Two fences, face to face, is kinda silly, no?


Not really. My backyard is offset from the 2 yards behind me,
approximately 2/3, 1/3. The 1/3 neighbor had some nice board-on-board
fencing, the 2/3 neighbor had chain link.

I bought the same style board-on-board fence and installed it face to
face with the chain link fence to hide it, to match the other 1/3 and
to provide more privacy.


Good grief. There is no "good side" of chain link fencing.


Of course there is. By code the posts must go inside the yard. That makes
one side "good" and the other side not.

You could say that there is no good side of board-on-board fence, but for
the same reason, there is. The posts must go on the owner's side.


Point being, two fences, face to face, isn't silly if there's a valid
reason.


Different subject.

Some pretty petty laws, as far as I'm concerned.

No, it's really just common sense.


Now that, I agree with.

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"HeyBub" wrote in message

There are actual LAWS governing the orientation of fences?

Must suck to live in such places.


Sucks even more to need a fence. Nearest to me is four properties up.
Never had a problem with dogs or kids.

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On Fri, 19 Oct 2012 23:10:56 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:


"HeyBub" wrote in message

There are actual LAWS governing the orientation of fences?

Must suck to live in such places.


Sucks even more to need a fence. Nearest to me is four properties up.
Never had a problem with dogs or kids.


Good fences make good neighbors. OTOH, there are only two houses on this
street (and large lots anyway) so I have no neighbors to improve. ;-)
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