UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.

Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting. Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an odd angle without an indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max cut depth 7.7cm. The motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and the cutting head can tilt in both directions (left & right) upto 45 degrees.

The cons:

The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The saw will work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace legal. Not hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.

The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd angle cuts.

The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.

The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the saw a lot it creates more fatigue than necessary.

Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor design points sorting.


NT
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 304
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

wrote:

Turntable has no position lock


Two of the photos on the website show a locking knob ...



  #3   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,905
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Thu, 19 May 2016 13:40:39 -0700, tabbypurr wrote:

A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.

Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting.
Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm
engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an odd
angle without an indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max
cut depth 7.7cm. The motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and
the cutting head can tilt in both directions (left & right) upto 45
degrees.

The cons:

The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The saw
will work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace
legal. Not hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.

The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd
angle cuts.

The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.

The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the saw a
lot it creates more fatigue than necessary.

Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor design
points sorting.


A couple of years ago, somebody here recommended the Evolution saws.

£100 at Screwfix, but there's always B- and C-grade on eBay from their
official outlet store.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112000231085

The B-grade I bought has stood up very, VERY well to reasonably heavy
domestic use - the "B-gradeness" of it seemed to be an ex-display model,
with a couple of holes drilled in the legs to secure it. The blade was
brand new, and there were no other signs of use.

Gotta be a better bet than an Aldidl one with some design problems.
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Thursday, 19 May 2016 21:58:10 UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:
tabbypurr wrote:


Turntable has no position lock


Two of the photos on the website show a locking knob ...


Site's detail view won't load. There are knobs I initally assumed were turntable lock, but turned out to be for the clamps.

I forgot to mention one other shortcoming. Clamp metalwork is chrome plated, making it difficult to clamp up without doing up all the screws on them first. My Rexon OTOH clamps fine with all the screws undone, a real time saver.

Also the Aldi has a split fence, which gives much more support than a traditional fixed 1 piece fence.


NT
  #6   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Friday, 20 May 2016 11:02:01 UTC+1, Andy Burns wrote:
tabbypurr wrote:
Andy Burns wrote:
tabbypurr wrote:

Turntable has no position lock

Two of the photos on the website show a locking knob ...


Site's detail view won't load.


The black knob at the front?

https://cdn.aldi-digital.co.uk/Double-Bevel-Sliding-Mitre-Saw-C.jpg?o=GTiBqiRJV8DRE18sw3hnRjf7GX0j&V=tIZ3&w=480& h=600&p=2&q=77


It's not here now for me to look at. All I can say is that's a long way from anywhere where moving turntable meets stationary base.


NT
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,019
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On 5/20/2016 8:09 AM, Adrian wrote:
On Thu, 19 May 2016 13:40:39 -0700, tabbypurr wrote:

A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.

Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting.
Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm
engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an odd
angle without an indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max
cut depth 7.7cm. The motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and
the cutting head can tilt in both directions (left & right) upto 45
degrees.

The cons:

The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The saw
will work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace
legal. Not hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.

The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd
angle cuts.

The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.

The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the saw a
lot it creates more fatigue than necessary.

Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor design
points sorting.


A couple of years ago, somebody here recommended the Evolution saws.

£100 at Screwfix, but there's always B- and C-grade on eBay from their
official outlet store.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112000231085

The B-grade I bought has stood up very, VERY well to reasonably heavy
domestic use - the "B-gradeness" of it seemed to be an ex-display model,
with a couple of holes drilled in the legs to secure it. The blade was
brand new, and there were no other signs of use.

Gotta be a better bet than an Aldidl one with some design problems.




Glad you posted that, I have one of these too and was thinking exactly
the same thing. The Evolution blade will also cut aluminium and steel,
very useful (but you get sprayed with sharp chips). Very good for
cutting dexion. Mine is out on loan to one of the kids at the moment so
not sure of the model. The knob for locking the turntable angle has come
adrift from the screw although you can still tighten it, I will need to
pin and/or glue it when it comes home.

I think I bought a medium sized one (210 mm?), there were larger and
smaller when I bought mine. No sign at all of "wear" on my B grade, I
guess I might find that the knob has already been glued back before.


  #9   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review



"newshound" wrote in message
...
On 5/20/2016 8:09 AM, Adrian wrote:
On Thu, 19 May 2016 13:40:39 -0700, tabbypurr wrote:

A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.

Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting.
Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm
engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an odd
angle without an indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max
cut depth 7.7cm. The motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and
the cutting head can tilt in both directions (left & right) upto 45
degrees.

The cons:

The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The saw
will work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace
legal. Not hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.

The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd
angle cuts.

The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.

The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the saw a
lot it creates more fatigue than necessary.

Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor design
points sorting.


A couple of years ago, somebody here recommended the Evolution saws.

£100 at Screwfix, but there's always B- and C-grade on eBay from their
official outlet store.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112000231085

The B-grade I bought has stood up very, VERY well to reasonably heavy
domestic use - the "B-gradeness" of it seemed to be an ex-display model,
with a couple of holes drilled in the legs to secure it. The blade was
brand new, and there were no other signs of use.

Gotta be a better bet than an Aldidl one with some design problems.




Glad you posted that, I have one of these too and was thinking exactly the
same thing. The Evolution blade will also cut aluminium and steel, very
useful (but you get sprayed with sharp chips). Very good for cutting
dexion.


Which dexion are you talking about, the roughly 5x3" angle with
very large holes in it for bolts, or the 25mm square black slotted
tube with knock in corners ?

Mine is out on loan to one of the kids at the moment so not sure of the
model. The knob for locking the turntable angle has come adrift from the
screw although you can still tighten it, I will need to pin and/or glue it
when it comes home.


I think I bought a medium sized one (210 mm?), there were larger and
smaller when I bought mine. No sign at all of "wear" on my B grade, I
guess I might find that the knob has already been glued back before.



  #10   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Saturday, 21 May 2016 07:18:35 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

Which dexion are you talking about, the roughly 5x3" angle with
very large holes in it for bolts, or the 25mm square black slotted
tube with knock in corners ?


I've never seen Dexion that size


NT


  #13   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,431
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Sat, 21 May 2016 12:09:24 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"
wrote:

In article ,
T i m wrote:
On Sat, 21 May 2016 02:12:05 -0700 (PDT), wrote:


On Saturday, 21 May 2016 07:18:35 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

Which dexion are you talking about, the roughly 5x3" angle with
very large holes in it for bolts, or the 25mm square black slotted
tube with knock in corners ?

I've never seen Dexion that size


Nor me. 25mm square black (unslottted) tube with knock in joints
sounds more like (Dexion) Speedframe?


Yes. Made some speaker stands from it.


I built an electric racing 'motorbike' from it (that used to be my
bench at work). ;-)

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/5772409/EV1.jpg

They once did a smaller version
(20mm?) in matt chrome.


Not seen that.

I use an angle grinder in a stand with steel cutting disc to cut it.


I used a hacksaw when building the EV.

I've use my sliding saw to cut ally - not sure I'd want to risk an
expensive blade on steel. Even one which claims to cut it. ;-)


I (now) have a steel cutting bandsaw and one of those big bench
grinding disk type cutters (loads of sparks though).

My local Dexion stockist is no more. Now a block of expensive flats. ;-)


I'm not surprised. Who (outside us here) builds anything these days,
even benches or racking. ;-(

Even kids construction sets are just kits for specific models. When I
had Lego and Meccano I don't think I ever got any instructions with it
.... and didn't need any. ;-)

Cheers, T i m

  #14   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,115
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Sat, 21 May 2016 12:33:44 +0100, T i m wrote:

My local Dexion stockist is no more. Now a block of expensive flats. ;-)


I'm not surprised. Who (outside us here) builds anything these days,
even benches or racking. ;-(


I had some Dexion 'clone' delivered two days ago. For some racking I want
to build.

--
My posts are my copyright and if @diy_forums or Home Owners' Hub
wish to copy them they can pay me £1 a message.
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK: http://www.mirrorservice.org
*lightning surge protection* - a w_tom conductor
  #15   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,019
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On 5/21/2016 7:18 AM, Rod Speed wrote:


"newshound" wrote in message
...
On 5/20/2016 8:09 AM, Adrian wrote:
On Thu, 19 May 2016 13:40:39 -0700, tabbypurr wrote:

A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.

Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting.
Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm
engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an
odd
angle without an indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max
cut depth 7.7cm. The motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and
the cutting head can tilt in both directions (left & right) upto 45
degrees.

The cons:

The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The
saw
will work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace
legal. Not hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.

The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd
angle cuts.

The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.

The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the
saw a
lot it creates more fatigue than necessary.

Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor
design
points sorting.

A couple of years ago, somebody here recommended the Evolution saws.

£100 at Screwfix, but there's always B- and C-grade on eBay from their
official outlet store.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112000231085

The B-grade I bought has stood up very, VERY well to reasonably heavy
domestic use - the "B-gradeness" of it seemed to be an ex-display model,
with a couple of holes drilled in the legs to secure it. The blade was
brand new, and there were no other signs of use.

Gotta be a better bet than an Aldidl one with some design problems.




Glad you posted that, I have one of these too and was thinking exactly
the same thing. The Evolution blade will also cut aluminium and steel,
very useful (but you get sprayed with sharp chips). Very good for
cutting dexion.


Which dexion are you talking about, the roughly 5x3" angle with
very large holes in it for bolts, or the 25mm square black slotted
tube with knock in corners ?


There are two sizes of the perforated angle iron, more like 4 x 2 or 2 x
2. Over here we tend to call the square stuff speedframe.

It's fine for cutting either of them.



  #16   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,431
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On 21 May 2016 13:46:52 GMT, Bob Eager wrote:

On Sat, 21 May 2016 12:33:44 +0100, T i m wrote:

My local Dexion stockist is no more. Now a block of expensive flats. ;-)


I'm not surprised. Who (outside us here) builds anything these days,
even benches or racking. ;-(


I had some Dexion 'clone' delivered two days ago. For some racking I want
to build.


I still have a few Dexion based racks and possibly some Dexion metal
draws that suit.

The bench in my workshop I built (4 welded frames bolted to the
longitudinals and braces) from scratch using some fairly heavy angle
because I wanted something that I could bolt a big vise to and would
take a thump and not move etc.

Cheers, T i m
  #17   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review



wrote in message
...
On Saturday, 21 May 2016 07:18:35 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

Which dexion are you talking about, the roughly 5x3" angle with
very large holes in it for bolts, or the 25mm square black slotted
tube with knock in corners ?


I've never seen Dexion that size


I was just guessing, didnt bother to look it up, presumably its 4x2" or
something.

  #19   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review



"Dave Plowman (News)" wrote in message
...
In article ,
T i m wrote:
On Sat, 21 May 2016 02:12:05 -0700 (PDT), wrote:


On Saturday, 21 May 2016 07:18:35 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

Which dexion are you talking about, the roughly 5x3" angle with
very large holes in it for bolts, or the 25mm square black slotted
tube with knock in corners ?

I've never seen Dexion that size


Nor me. 25mm square black (unslottted) tube with knock in joints
sounds more like (Dexion) Speedframe?


Yes. Made some speaker stands from it. They once did a smaller version
(20mm?) in matt chrome.

I use an angle grinder in a stand with steel cutting disc to cut it.


I use a 10" hand held circular saw in my own cutoff saw stand
with a steel cutting disk to cut it but I was asking if he uses that
other blade to do that.

I now have 3 dedicate cutoff saws which is handy because the
switch in that circular saw that I used to build the house with
has now died.

I've use my sliding saw to cut ally - not sure I'd want to risk an
expensive blade on steel. Even one which claims to cut it. ;-)


Yeah, that's what I have done so far but was wondering if he
found it works fine so it might be worth trying myself.

The steel cutting disk isnt perfect in the sense that you do
get a bit of flange of steel that you need to trim with an
angle grinder after cutting it and I've always had some
reservations about what it would be like if the disk
comes apart in use. Not that I have ever had one fail.

My local Dexion stockist is no more. Now a block of expensive flats. ;-)


I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.

I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.

I should really just guillotine the spines off in a massive
great hydraulic guillotine and use a decent scanner to
turn all the books into ebooks but that seems a tad
gung ho even for me.

  #20   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Saturday, 21 May 2016 21:54:48 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.

I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.


Wood works better for that sort of thing.

I should really just guillotine the spines off in a massive
great hydraulic guillotine and use a decent scanner to
turn all the books into ebooks but that seems a tad
gung ho even for me.


I wouldn't be surprised if most titles have been OCRed already.


NT


  #21   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review



wrote in message
...
On Saturday, 21 May 2016 21:54:48 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.

I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.


Wood works better for that sort of thing.


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves, nothing like
as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust the
shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.

I should really just guillotine the spines off in a massive
great hydraulic guillotine and use a decent scanner to
turn all the books into ebooks but that seems a tad
gung ho even for me.


I wouldn't be surprised if most titles have been OCRed already.


Trouble is the prices that Amazon wants for them. They are almost
entirely books that I have got from garage/yard sales, mostly for
50c, sometimes for $1 each. Amazon wants at least $10 for most
of them, plenty of them it wants a lot more than that. I dont buy
fiction much at all anymore, that's almost exclusively non fiction
and I have thousands of them quite literally.

  #22   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43,017
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

In article ,
Rod Speed wrote:
The steel cutting disk isnt perfect in the sense that you do
get a bit of flange of steel that you need to trim with an
angle grinder after cutting it and I've always had some
reservations about what it would be like if the disk
comes apart in use. Not that I have ever had one fail.


The trick is to change the disc frequently as they seem to blunt. They're
cheap enough. And not 'force' it through the work too hard. That minimises
any lip. And with painted Speedframe, prevents damage to the paint.

Also it might depend on the speed of your saw. The angle grinder is
optimised for discs.

But most will need a rub with a file etc after cutting.

--
*You can't have everything, where would you put it?*

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #23   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Sunday, 22 May 2016 02:10:49 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
tabbypurr wrote in message
...
On Saturday, 21 May 2016 21:54:48 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:

I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.

I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.


Wood works better for that sort of thing.


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,


no issue there with wood framing

nothing like
as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust the
shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.


wood shelving is infinitely adjustable.

Could you just get something right for once in your idiot life?
  #24   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,300
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review


wrote in message
...

Could you just get something right for once in your idiot life?


I was about to say - careful, you'll be killfiled. You should be ok though,
you're one of the few who responds to him


  #25   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

Dave Plowman (News) wrote
Rod Speed wrote


The steel cutting disk isnt perfect in the sense that you
do get a bit of flange of steel that you need to trim with
an angle grinder after cutting it and I've always had
some reservations about what it would be like if the disk
comes apart in use. Not that I have ever had one fail.


The trick is to change the disc frequently as they seem to blunt.


Never saw anything like that myself.

They're cheap enough. And not 'force' it through
the work too hard. That minimises any lip.


You still get a lip that needs to be dealt with and since
I normally do that with 4" angle grinder it really doesnt matter
if its minimised if you need to use the angle grinder at all.

That is the big potential advantage of a toothed cutting disk,
in theory there should be no lip at all. But obviously the blades
are much more expensive, which is why I haven't tried doing it
that way yet, and why I asked how well it works on Speedframe.

And with painted Speedframe, prevents damage to the paint.


Not a major consideration for me because I normally weld the
Speedframe corners instead of using the tap in corners.

Also it might depend on the speed of your saw.
The angle grinder is optimised for discs.


But I prefer to use the circular saw, much easier to do
a cutoff saw with a hand held circular saw than with
an angle grinder and I need the big metal cutting disks
for the other RHS cutting. I do quite a bit of stuff with
50x50mm RHS, particularly the big gate and the frame
for the 20' long kitchen bench which is cantilevered off
the wall with no legs at all so you can put anything you
like in the way of cupboards, dishwashers, small upright
freezers the size of bar fridges under that and rearrange
them any time you need to when say a dishwasher dies
and is replaced or even have two of them etc.

That bench runs the entire length of that side of the
kitchen with a block wall return at either end of it
so the whole thing is cantilevered with no legs at all.

And now with multiple real cutoff saws, the choice is
14" metal cutoff disks or one of those toothed metal
cutting disks.

But most will need a rub with a file etc after cutting.


I dont need to because I arc weld the corners and paint
them after welding.



  #26   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

wrote
Rod Speed wrote
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote


I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.


I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.


Wood works better for that sort of thing.


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,


no issue there with wood framing


MUCH easier to do with slotted steel tube.

nothing like as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust
the shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.


wood shelving is infinitely adjustable.


But not as easily as moving what is in the slot.


  #27   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Sunday, 22 May 2016 20:09:32 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote


I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.


I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.


Wood works better for that sort of thing.


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,


no issue there with wood framing


MUCH easier to do with slotted steel tube.


is it?

nothing like as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust
the shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.


wood shelving is infinitely adjustable.


But not as easily as moving what is in the slot.


A screw versus a bolt. The main upside of timber framed shelving is that you can make it the exact size and if necessary shape of wherever it's going, in all 3 dimensions. It also looks much better in a home than dexion. And finally it's much more versatile and easy to add features onto, something that's seldom done with steel because it's a pig to do.


NT
  #28   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review



wrote in message
...
On Sunday, 22 May 2016 20:09:32 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote


I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.


I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.


Wood works better for that sort of thing.


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,


no issue there with wood framing


MUCH easier to do with slotted steel tube.


is it?


Corse it is.

nothing like as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust
the shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.


wood shelving is infinitely adjustable.


But not as easily as moving what is in the slot.


A screw versus a bolt.


There is no bolt.

The main upside of timber framed shelving is that
you can make it the exact size and if necessary
shape of wherever it's going, in all 3 dimensions.


Even sillier than you usually manage with a properly built house.

It also looks much better in a home than dexion.


Even sillier than you usually manage with Speedframe.

And finally it's much more versatile and easy to add features onto,


Only a terminal ****wit like you does anything like that.

something that's seldom done with steel because it's a pig to do.


Because only terminal ****wits like you do stupid stuff like that.


  #29   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Monday, 23 May 2016 10:47:59 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
tabbypurr wrote in message
...
On Sunday, 22 May 2016 20:09:32 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote

I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.

I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.

Wood works better for that sort of thing.

Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,

no issue there with wood framing

MUCH easier to do with slotted steel tube.


is it?


Corse it is.

nothing like as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust
the shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.

wood shelving is infinitely adjustable.

But not as easily as moving what is in the slot.


A screw versus a bolt.


There is no bolt.

The main upside of timber framed shelving is that
you can make it the exact size and if necessary
shape of wherever it's going, in all 3 dimensions.


Even sillier than you usually manage with a properly built house.

It also looks much better in a home than dexion.


Even sillier than you usually manage with Speedframe.

And finally it's much more versatile and easy to add features onto,


Only a terminal ****wit like you does anything like that.

something that's seldom done with steel because it's a pig to do.


Because only terminal ****wits like you do stupid stuff like that.


Thank you for confirming you're unable to substantiate any of your claims. And say hello to the kill file.


NT
  #30   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,257
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review


"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...

Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,



Unless you want the thing toppling over, you need to screw it to the wall
at the top, whatever its made of. Steel, wood, whatever.

Once its screwed to the wall at the top, in two or more places
its rigid.


michael adams

....




  #31   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
No Name
 
Posts: n/a
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review



wrote in message
...
On Monday, 23 May 2016 10:47:59 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
tabbypurr wrote in message
...
On Sunday, 22 May 2016 20:09:32 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote
tabbypurr wrote
Rod Speed wrote

I can't find anyone local selling the dexion slotted tube
anymore and was considering importing a pack or two of it.

I got one when I was building the house and have
now used it all for shelving and need to do some
more, mainly for full floor to ceiling bookshelves
covering an entire quite large wall.

Wood works better for that sort of thing.

Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,

no issue there with wood framing

MUCH easier to do with slotted steel tube.


is it?


Corse it is.

nothing like as easy to have slots every 25mm so you can adjust
the shelf spacing to minimise the waste of space vertically.

wood shelving is infinitely adjustable.

But not as easily as moving what is in the slot.


A screw versus a bolt.


There is no bolt.

The main upside of timber framed shelving is that
you can make it the exact size and if necessary
shape of wherever it's going, in all 3 dimensions.


Even sillier than you usually manage with a properly built house.

It also looks much better in a home than dexion.


Even sillier than you usually manage with Speedframe.

And finally it's much more versatile and easy to add features onto,


Only a terminal ****wit like you does anything like that.

something that's seldom done with steel because it's a pig to do.


Because only terminal ****wits like you do stupid stuff like that.


Thank you for confirming you're unable to substantiate any of your claims.


YOU made that stupid claim.

YOU get to substantiate your stupid pig ignorant claim.

THATS how it works.

And say hello to the kill file.


Thanks for running up the white flag so enthusiastically, ****wit child.

  #32   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

michael adams wrote
Rod Speed wrote


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,


Unless you want the thing toppling over, you need to screw it to
the wall at the top, whatever its made of. Steel, wood, whatever.


I said that in the bit you carefully deleted from the quoting.

Once its screwed to the wall at the top, in two or more places its rigid.


Pigs arse it is if the frame isnt made properly.

Much easier to do that with welded Speedframe.
  #33   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Monday, 23 May 2016 12:36:02 UTC+1, michael adams wrote:
"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,



Unless you want the thing toppling over, you need to screw it to the wall
at the top, whatever its made of. Steel, wood, whatever.


Depends on its dimensions.


NT
  #34   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,257
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review


wrote in message
...
On Monday, 23 May 2016 12:36:02 UTC+1, michael adams wrote:
"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,



Unless you want the thing toppling over, you need to screw it to the wall
at the top, whatever its made of. Steel, wood, whatever.


Depends on its dimensions.


Indeed. But the ceiling height bookshelves which were mentioned,
presumably around 8ft high - should ideally be no more than 9 or 10
inches deep so as to make the best use of available space. With
all the weight towards the front edge, than than being pushed in
against the wall at the back.

michael adams

....


  #35   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review



"michael adams" wrote in message
o.uk...

wrote in message
...
On Monday, 23 May 2016 12:36:02 UTC+1, michael adams wrote:
"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...


Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,


Unless you want the thing toppling over, you need to screw it to the
wall
at the top, whatever its made of. Steel, wood, whatever.


Depends on its dimensions.


Indeed. But the ceiling height bookshelves which were mentioned,
presumably around 8ft high - should ideally be no more than 9 or 10
inches deep so as to make the best use of available space.


Depends on what you have on it. That isnt too bad for books,
but is too shallow for where you want to put the big stuff like
cutoff saws and lawn mowers and spare wall ovens, dishwashers,
washing machines etc.

With all the weight towards the front edge, than than being pushed in
against the wall at the back.





  #36   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Tuesday, 24 May 2016 19:55:18 UTC+1, Rod Speed wrote:
"michael adams" wrote in message
o.uk...
tabbypurr wrote in message
...
On Monday, 23 May 2016 12:36:02 UTC+1, michael adams wrote:
"Rod Speed" wrote in message
...



Like hell it does. Nothing like as easy to make completely
rigid vertical frames that support the shelves,


Unless you want the thing toppling over, you need to screw it to the
wall
at the top, whatever its made of. Steel, wood, whatever.

Depends on its dimensions.


Indeed. But the ceiling height bookshelves which were mentioned,
presumably around 8ft high - should ideally be no more than 9 or 10
inches deep so as to make the best use of available space.


yes, fixing vital for that one.

Depends on what you have on it. That isnt too bad for books,
but is too shallow for where you want to put the big stuff like
cutoff saws and lawn mowers and spare wall ovens, dishwashers,
washing machines etc.


Idiot strikes again


NT
  #37   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,364
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Thursday, 19 May 2016 21:40:42 UTC+1, tabbypurr wrote:
A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.

Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting. Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an odd angle without an indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max cut depth 7.7cm. The motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and the cutting head can tilt in both directions (left & right) upto 45 degrees.

The cons:

The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The saw will work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace legal. Not hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.

The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd angle cuts.

The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.

The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the saw a lot it creates more fatigue than necessary.

Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor design points sorting.


NT


Now 50 quid. Remarkable deal imho.


NT
  #38   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

On Friday, May 20, 2016 at 6:40:42 AM UTC+10, wrote:
A quick review - it's still in stock at £79.99.

Solidly built, all metal base, fast cutting, very clean cutting. Turntable has no position lock, but it doesn't need one due to the firm engagement of angular positions. What it's like if you're cutting an odd angle without an indentation I don't know. Max cut length over 12", max cut depth 7.7cm. The motor is angled upward giving welcome space, and the cutting head can tilt in both directions (left & right) upto 45 degrees.

The cons:

The release whatsit that enables the head to go down is plastic. The saw will work fine if it gets broken, but it wouldn't then be workplace legal. Not hard to fabricate one, but then you'd have a modified saw.

The turntable angle pointer is also plastic. It's only needed for odd angle cuts.

The laser points down the centre of the cut line, not down one edge.

The spring pushing the cutting head up is OTT. If you're using the saw a lot it creates more fatigue than necessary.

Overall a good performing saw, but wouldn't say no to a few minor design points sorting.


NT


I bought their Miter saw stand too & its sturdy enough but the bolts that hold it together are made out of zinc plated cheese. They snap before you even put a spanner on them. Soon as you take a wrench out of your tool box the saw stand knows and the bolts snap.
  #39   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Aldi sliding mitre saw review

replying to tabbypurr, HandsomeMan wrote:
I bought their miter saw stand & it's sturdy enough but like all of the Aldi
stuff the bolts that hold it together were made out of zinc plated cheese &
snapped with very light tightening. If you are prepared to replace the bolts
etc. it's OK I guess.

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy...w-1131227-.htm


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aldi and Lidl sliding compound mitre saws James Harris[_3_] UK diy 9 May 3rd 16 07:44 PM
Sliding mitre saw fred UK diy 42 December 19th 12 09:27 PM
Mitre saw /sliding mitre saw TMC[_2_] UK diy 15 July 24th 11 01:13 PM
Sliding mitre saw anyone? George UK diy 60 May 23rd 08 12:39 AM
aldi sliding mitre saw - opinions please Tim_UK UK diy 58 May 31st 07 03:01 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:58 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"