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Old February 26th 20, 11:02 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I slid
the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It even
held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of simply
gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base or adding
a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as strong? If so,
what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks

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Old February 26th 20, 11:35 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 6:02:08 PM UTC-5, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I slid
the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It even
held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of simply
gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base or adding
a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as strong? If so,
what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks


What is "clean break"?

Is it a perfectly flat, glue ready break?

That would actually concern me. Without seeing the actually break (photo
perhaps?) I'm led to believe that it is a glue joint that previously failed.
That could mean that new glue might not hold since you might not be
gluing wood to wood,you'd actually be gluing old glue to old glue.

If that is the case, then I'd be even more inclined to add some mechanical
support such as a dowel or threaded rod. At a minimum, perhaps some keys
cut into both surfaces and then thickened epoxy that can grab onto those
keys.
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Old February 27th 20, 12:21 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On 2/26/2020 6:02 PM, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I slid
the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It even held
in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of simply gluing or
epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base or adding a rod/dowel
in the center? Do you think it'll be just as strong? If so, what epoxy/glue
do you recommend?

Thanks


No matter how you look at it, a glue joint there will be end-grain, thus
the weakest possible no matter what sort of glue you use. If it was my
repair I'd certainly be adding some sort of reinforcement.

As an aside, if I remember the pictures you provided, the portion remaining
attached at the top was pretty thin. Is there access inside the piece to
get a drill in? If so it would (well, might) be possible to put the joint
together, drill down through the case into the top of the leg and into the
broken section making the alignment of a dowel ever so much simpler. A less
elegant solution would be to drill, glue, and insert a long deck-type screw
from inside but that might be even stronger than a dowel and would require
a smaller-diameter hole to be drilled. Just a SWAG...

--
Bodger's Dictum: Artifical intelligence
can never overcome natural stupidity.
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Old February 27th 20, 02:55 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On 2/26/2020 6:35 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 6:02:08 PM UTC-5, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I slid
the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It even
held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of simply
gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base or adding
a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as strong? If so,
what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks


What is "clean break"?


My definition of a clean break is one that didn't break in several
pieces which would require gluing those pieces back in or filling in
opening left from the break. It's not smooth by far but if you were a
tiny insect or from Honey I shrunk myself, it would be a wooden
mountainous region.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/182239...posted-public/




Is it a perfectly flat, glue ready break?

That would actually concern me. Without seeing the actually break (photo
perhaps?) I'm led to believe that it is a glue joint that previously failed.
That could mean that new glue might not hold since you might not be
gluing wood to wood,you'd actually be gluing old glue to old glue.


It's not an old glue joint. The wood fibers are jagged on each side but
I am able to line up the leg perfectly, push it towards the table and
the tension of the fibers hold it in place and very little of the broken
seam can be seen. If it were my table, I'd just glue it back on and be
good with it, but I'm charging someone to fix it and I don't want to redo

If that is the case, then I'd be even more inclined to add some mechanical
support such as a dowel or threaded rod. At a minimum, perhaps some keys
cut into both surfaces and then thickened epoxy that can grab onto those
keys.


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Old February 27th 20, 03:03 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On 2/26/2020 7:21 PM, John McGaw wrote:
On 2/26/2020 6:02 PM, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I
slid the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It
even held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of
simply gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base
or adding a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as
strong? If so, what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks


No matter how you look at it, a glue joint there will be end-grain, thus
the weakest possible no matter what sort of glue you use. If it was my
repair I'd certainly be adding some sort of reinforcement.

As an aside, if I remember the pictures you provided, the portion
remaining attached at the top was pretty thin. Is there access inside
the piece to get a drill in? If so it would (well, might) be possible to
put the joint together, drill down through the case into the top of the
leg and into the broken section making the alignment of a dowel ever so
much simpler. A less elegant solution would be to drill, glue, and
insert a long deck-type screw from inside but that might be even
stronger than a dowel and would require a smaller-diameter hole to be
drilled. Just a SWAG...


That top part left on the table is part of the leg and attached to the
table. I would need to flush cut it off using my thin saw, similar to a
Japanese saw, reattach to the leg with glue, then drill a hole in the
center to add a dowel, leaving that dowel protruding from the top, drill
a hole in the table for that dowel, then glue the entire leg back to the
table. Thus, the glue or epoxy will still need to be strong enough to
hold the leg to the table, but the dowel will provide strength mainly
when someone pulls the table along the floor.


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Old February 27th 20, 03:46 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On Wed, 26 Feb 2020 22:03:39 -0500, Hawk wrote:

On 2/26/2020 7:21 PM, John McGaw wrote:
On 2/26/2020 6:02 PM, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I
slid the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It
even held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of
simply gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base
or adding a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as
strong? If so, what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks


No matter how you look at it, a glue joint there will be end-grain, thus
the weakest possible no matter what sort of glue you use. If it was my
repair I'd certainly be adding some sort of reinforcement.

As an aside, if I remember the pictures you provided, the portion
remaining attached at the top was pretty thin. Is there access inside
the piece to get a drill in? If so it would (well, might) be possible to
put the joint together, drill down through the case into the top of the
leg and into the broken section making the alignment of a dowel ever so
much simpler. A less elegant solution would be to drill, glue, and
insert a long deck-type screw from inside but that might be even
stronger than a dowel and would require a smaller-diameter hole to be
drilled. Just a SWAG...


That top part left on the table is part of the leg and attached to the
table. I would need to flush cut it off using my thin saw, similar to a
Japanese saw, reattach to the leg with glue, then drill a hole in the
center to add a dowel, leaving that dowel protruding from the top, drill
a hole in the table for that dowel, then glue the entire leg back to the
table. Thus, the glue or epoxy will still need to be strong enough to
hold the leg to the table, but the dowel will provide strength mainly
when someone pulls the table along the floor.

What is the top of the table like? Can you glue theleg together, then
drill it from the top and install a dowel or pin from the top, then
install a matching plug and refinish it to match? Mabee add 3 more
plugs to make it look like it was made that way?
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Old February 27th 20, 12:33 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 5:02:08 PM UTC-6, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I slid
the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It even
held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of simply
gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base or adding
a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as strong? If so,
what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks



Since you have those jagged edges, not all of the glue will be end grain, but you will pick up a significant amount of side grain as well. That being said, a lot depends on what the table is used for. If its a side table, without a lot of stress on it, there is no reason a good glue or epoxy should not hold. If you are worried about the strength, you could always put a dowel in to physically join the pieces. But, given what you have said, I would definitely try the glue up first.
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Old February 27th 20, 01:13 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 9:55:38 PM UTC-5, Hawk wrote:
On 2/26/2020 6:35 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 6:02:08 PM UTC-5, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I slid
the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It even
held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of simply
gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base or adding
a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as strong? If so,
what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks


What is "clean break"?


My definition of a clean break is one that didn't break in several
pieces which would require gluing those pieces back in or filling in
opening left from the break. It's not smooth by far but if you were a
tiny insect or from Honey I shrunk myself, it would be a wooden
mountainous region.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/182239...posted-public/




Is it a perfectly flat, glue ready break?

That would actually concern me. Without seeing the actually break (photo
perhaps?) I'm led to believe that it is a glue joint that previously failed.
That could mean that new glue might not hold since you might not be
gluing wood to wood,you'd actually be gluing old glue to old glue.


It's not an old glue joint. The wood fibers are jagged on each side but
I am able to line up the leg perfectly, push it towards the table and
the tension of the fibers hold it in place and very little of the broken
seam can be seen. If it were my table, I'd just glue it back on and be
good with it, but I'm charging someone to fix it and I don't want to redo

If that is the case, then I'd be even more inclined to add some mechanical
support such as a dowel or threaded rod. At a minimum, perhaps some keys
cut into both surfaces and then thickened epoxy that can grab onto those
keys.


It seems like nothing has changed from your previous thread, therefore
all the original suggestions still stand.

You *may* have enough nooks and crannies for a solid fix with just
glue/epoxy, but if you never want to go back, then any of the mechanical
supports that were suggested would ensure a permanent fix.

If it were me, and even if it were my table, I'd add the extra support.
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Old February 27th 20, 03:16 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On 2/26/2020 5:02 PM, Hawk wrote:
I had a chance to look at the table leg and it was a clean break. I slid
the leg back into the base, fit right in and it looked great. It even
held in place. Therefore, my question is what anyone thinks of simply
gluing or epoxying the leg without trying to cut off the base or adding
a rod/dowel in the center? Do you think it'll be just as strong? If so,
what epoxy/glue do you recommend?

Thanks



Reinforce the repair, there is a lot of leverage to break again.
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Old February 27th 20, 03:48 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Table Leg Repair part Deux

On Wednesday, February 26, 2020 at 9:03:22 PM UTC-6, Hawk wrote:

That top part left on the table is part of the leg and attached to the
table. I would need to flush cut it off using my thin saw, similar to a
Japanese saw, reattach to the leg with glue, then drill a hole in the
center to add a dowel, leaving that dowel protruding from the top, drill
a hole in the table for that dowel, then glue the entire leg back to the
table. Thus, the glue or epoxy will still need to be strong enough to
hold the leg to the table, but the dowel will provide strength mainly
when someone pulls the table along the floor.


From the get go, we could not advise you as to repair or price. You needed to go inspect the table and give us more info.

How is the leg "permanently" attached to the table top? A simple dowel or tenon is likely not the method. Your dowel repair, as you describe, will likely not hold up, in a "permanently fixed" (as originally said) condition.. The leg is most likely attached with a blind wedged dowel or tenon. I would recommend doing a similar repair, whether you use a dowel or tenon.
https://www.craftsmanspace.com/knowl...ise-joint.html

IMO for a simple (5/8" at least) dowel extension to hopefully best/better work, it would need to extend into the table top at least 1.5"-2". Is the table top that thick?

If you are not familiar with a blind wedged dowel or tenon, do some practice work on some scrap. Getting the wedge length and (not too thick) width is important as to getting a good fit when the dowel/tenon is jammed into the its hole. Do some practicing if you're not familiar with this attaching technique. Might want to use a 3/4" or 1" dowel if the leg diameter accommodates this size without splitting.

IF you do cut off the part still attached to the table, then you will likely see what size dowel or tenon was (most likely) used in the first place...... and maybe be able to determine if that attachment was a wedged joint technique.

Sonny



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