Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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  #11   Report Post  
Old May 19th 05, 10:27 PM
~Roy~
 
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Its not a Yankee screwdriver its a Push Drill made by Yankee..........
Works similar to the screwdriver but is designed for drill bits. How
many do you want, I probably have about 6 or so of em in the shop
drawer unused for many many years......most are still heavily chrome
plated on brass........ with a steel shank


On Thu, 19 May 2005 11:10:04 -0700, Grant Erwin
wrote:

===This is another one from my neighbor's basement. It looks pretty much like
===a screwdriver, except the shank is tubular, about 3/8" OD, with a quick
===disconnect chuck on the end. The end of the handle screws off to reveal a
===bunch of bits. These are not screwdriver bits. They are like drill bits but
===they aren't twist drills. From the end they look quite a bit like a twist
===drill but only the end has helical relief. On the sides are two straight
===flutes, no spiral at all. The tool is self-twisting, i.e. when you push it
===into the work it twists. The only lettering says "YANKEE".
===
===Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft uses it? The bit sizes range
===from about 1/16" to about 3/16".
===
===GWE



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  #12   Report Post  
Old May 19th 05, 10:39 PM
Grant Erwin
 
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Grant Erwin wrote:

This is another one from my neighbor's basement. It looks pretty much like
a screwdriver, except the shank is tubular, about 3/8" OD, with a quick
disconnect chuck on the end. The end of the handle screws off to reveal a
bunch of bits. These are not screwdriver bits. They are like drill bits but
they aren't twist drills. From the end they look quite a bit like a twist
drill but only the end has helical relief. On the sides are two straight
flutes, no spiral at all. The tool is self-twisting, i.e. when you push it
into the work it twists. The only lettering says "YANKEE".

Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft uses it? The bit sizes range
from about 1/16" to about 3/16".

GWE


It's a Yankee push drill, all right. I have one of their screwdrivers too,
this one is quite different. The screwdrivers have external visible helix
grooves, and the push drill doesn't.

GWE
  #13   Report Post  
Old May 20th 05, 06:27 AM
DoN. Nichols
 
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In article ,
Leo Lichtman wrote:

"Grant Erwin" wrote: (clip) Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft
uses it? (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Yep. The answer is right on it. It's a Yankee screwdriver. If the toolset
in the handle were complete, it would include a couple of screwdriver bits,
along with the drill bits. It supposedly would be used by people in the
wood crafts, like carpenters and cabinet makers. I have seen them in
collections, tool sales and flea markets, but I have never known of one
actually being used.


The first one that I saw was in about the second grade, in a
small town in South Texas (about 1948-1949). It was being used to
install a replacement mortice door latch assembly, and he used it both
to drill the pilot holes and to drive the screw. That was when I
decided that I wanted one.

I have a set now, *much* later, from an estate sale.

As a screwdriver it's not too good, because the bit
tends to slip out of the slot as it spins, and when it does, the rest of the
stroke drives it into the wood.


That depends on how you use it. The knurled collar which you
pull back to release the bit is free to turn on the shaft, so you can
hold the collar (near the screwdriver blade) to steady it. This makes
it a lot better than some of the electric screwdrivers in terms of
anti-gouge control.

Enjoy,
DoN.

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  #14   Report Post  
Old May 20th 05, 06:46 AM
lionslair at consolidated dot net
 
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Grant Erwin wrote:

This is another one from my neighbor's basement. It looks pretty much like
a screwdriver, except the shank is tubular, about 3/8" OD, with a quick
disconnect chuck on the end. The end of the handle screws off to reveal a
bunch of bits. These are not screwdriver bits. They are like drill bits but
they aren't twist drills. From the end they look quite a bit like a twist
drill but only the end has helical relief. On the sides are two straight
flutes, no spiral at all. The tool is self-twisting, i.e. when you push it
into the work it twists. The only lettering says "YANKEE".

Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft uses it? The bit sizes range
from about 1/16" to about 3/16".

GWE

That is a Yankee tool. It is a wood workers dream. The bits are put in the chuck
and a push on the handle - it moves toward the work and the double helix
drives the chuck (handle is in the hand right ) round and round. Drills nicely.
The drills are much like D drills but are really C type. Dad had or has one.

He had screw driver bits also. I bet he does in his fix it kit.

Martin
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  #15   Report Post  
Old May 20th 05, 03:05 PM
Daniel A. Mitchell
 
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Ned Simmons wrote:

In article [email protected]
news.ops.worldnet.att.net,
says...

"Grant Erwin" wrote: (clip) Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft
uses it? (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Yep. The answer is right on it. It's a Yankee screwdriver. If the toolset
in the handle were complete, it would include a couple of screwdriver bits,
along with the drill bits. It supposedly would be used by people in the
wood crafts, like carpenters and cabinet makers. I have seen them in
collections, tool sales and flea markets, but I have never known of one
actually being used. As a screwdriver it's not too good, because the bit
tends to slip out of the slot as it spins, and when it does, the rest of the
stroke drives it into the wood.



What Grant has is a Yankee push drill - the Yankee
screwdriver is a different tool. I have one of the larger
screwdrivers and use it quite a lot. As for slipping out of
the the screw head, it is more practical for use with
Philips head screws than slotted heads. Yankee is a Stanley
brand name.

http://www.epinions.com/Stanley_Yank...Woodworking_Pu
sh_Drill_Shop_Tools

http://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?
ItemType=PRODUCT&iProductID=103531

Ned Simmons

Yes, it's a DRILL, not a screwdriver. The mechanism was very similar.
The screwdrivers usually had an exposed helical scroll to do the
turning. The push-drills usually had a spring loaded sleeve covering the
scroll.

I have several of these tools. The newest dates from about 1960. One old
(1930's?) screwdriver is about 24" long when fully extended. The
push-drills I have are much smaller, only about a foot long. The
screwdrivers often included one or two drill bits, but not a lot of
sizes like the drills. Of the ones I have none of the screwdriver bits,
even their drill bits, will fit in the drill chucks. The drills seem to
mostly use a smaller chuck size than the screwdrivers. The bit mounting
mechanism was similar, with one end of the bit cut away to a "D" shape
for driving, and a half-round notch in the bit's shank for a ball detent
to 'grab' the bit and hold in in the chuck.

In addition to Phillips head-screw bits the screwdrivers also were
available with clutch-head bits. Both stay self centered in the
fastener. I suppose they'd work well with the square-drive screws also,
but I don't have any bits like those (probably too new).

I still find them handy to use, for wood work. They will drill into soft
metals, but with difficulty. They require a little practice to use well,
as you have to push STRAIGHT or you break the drills, or pop the
driver-bit out of the fastener. You never have to worry about where the
nearest electrical outlet is, or whether the battery is charged.

Dan Mitchell
============


  #16   Report Post  
Old May 20th 05, 04:16 PM
John Martin
 
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Grant Erwin wrote:
This is another one from my neighbor's basement. It looks pretty much

like
a screwdriver, except the shank is tubular, about 3/8" OD, with a

quick
disconnect chuck on the end. The end of the handle screws off to

reveal a
bunch of bits. These are not screwdriver bits. They are like drill

bits but
they aren't twist drills. From the end they look quite a bit like a

twist
drill but only the end has helical relief. On the sides are two

straight
flutes, no spiral at all. The tool is self-twisting, i.e. when you

push it
into the work it twists. The only lettering says "YANKEE".

Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft uses it? The bit sizes

range
from about 1/16" to about 3/16".

GWE


You've already figured out that this is a Yankee push drill, probably a
number 41. Used for woodworking jobs, such as drilling holes for small
hinges. They are handy, but the straight-fluted bits don't clear chips
as well as twist drills do.

The Yankee tools were originally made by North Brothers, of
Philadelphia. They were bought out by Stanley around 1950 or so. The
quality of the North Bros. stuff was very good. They made, in addition
to the push drills, spiral ratchet screwdrivers, eggbeater-type hand
drills, bit braces, ratchet screwdrivers, ratchet offset screwdrivers,
drill press vises and a host of other tools.

One of their most interesting tools, in my opinion, was the
eggbeater-style hand drill with five-way ratchet. Also available as a
breast drill. You still see them occasionally. The ratchet had five
positions: plain (no ratchet), right hand (which allowed you to drill
in cramped areas with only a partial sweep of the handle), left hand
(same thing but to the left, which I don't know the use of as we all
know that when backing a drill out you continue to turn in the same
direction), lock (which locked the spindle to make changing bits
easier) and, best of all, right hand double (which turns the drill in
the proper direction no matter which way you turn the crank).

John Martin

  #17   Report Post  
Old May 20th 05, 06:10 PM
Jim McGill
 
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Grant

Yankee screwdrivers were the prebattery equivalent of a screw gun. I've
got several sizes I've picked up over the years. They're still beloved
by wooden boat builders because you can't over torque screws and chew up
the wood, but they're a lot easier of the wrist than a regular
screwdriver. You can also use them underwater (try that with your
Makita!). There's a huge number of different bits that fit them, slot,
Allen, square, even 1/4" socket adapters. You can buy the bits at
Hardwick's if you want some. Next time I'm over, I'll bring along some
and you can try them out. Very handy tool, hold on to it.

Jim
  #18   Report Post  
Old May 20th 05, 06:14 PM
Gunner
 
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On Thu, 19 May 2005 18:22:32 GMT, "Leo Lichtman"
wrote:


"Grant Erwin" wrote: (clip) Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft
uses it? (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Yep. The answer is right on it. It's a Yankee screwdriver. If the toolset
in the handle were complete, it would include a couple of screwdriver bits,
along with the drill bits. It supposedly would be used by people in the
wood crafts, like carpenters and cabinet makers. I have seen them in
collections, tool sales and flea markets, but I have never known of one
actually being used. As a screwdriver it's not too good, because the bit
tends to slip out of the slot as it spins, and when it does, the rest of the
stroke drives it into the wood.


I inherited several from my dad as well. One was a spring loaded drill
only, with bit storage in the handle. The other was screwdriver only.
The drill worked rather well on wood.

Never ever hold the work in your hand when using the screwdriver
one...you will leak all over the place and it really hurts...

Sigh..I learned that when I was 11.

Gunner

"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire.
Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us)
off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give
them self determination under "play nice" rules.

Think of it as having your older brother knock the **** out of you
for torturing the cat." Gunner
  #19   Report Post  
Old May 20th 05, 06:35 PM
Daniel A. Mitchell
 
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John Martin wrote:

snip

One of their most interesting tools, in my opinion, was the
eggbeater-style hand drill with five-way ratchet. Also available as a
breast drill. You still see them occasionally. The ratchet had five
positions: plain (no ratchet), right hand (which allowed you to drill
in cramped areas with only a partial sweep of the handle), left hand
(same thing but to the left, which I don't know the use of as we all
know that when backing a drill out you continue to turn in the same
direction), lock (which locked the spindle to make changing bits
easier) and, best of all, right hand double (which turns the drill in
the proper direction no matter which way you turn the crank).

John Martin

Interesting. I have a large old hand cranked drill (a little smaller
than most breast drills) with a gear shift mechanism that allows two
speeds (or torques), and rotation in either direction, but no ratchet
action as you describe. There sure were a wide variety of hand tools
that you can't get new any longer. Some are truly obsolete today, but
others are still very usefull (like the push drills)... they've just
gone out of style.

Dan Mitchell
============
  #20   Report Post  
Old May 23rd 05, 05:58 PM
pyotr filipivich
 
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Let the record show that Gunner wrote back on
Fri, 20 May 2005 16:14:57 GMT in rec.crafts.metalworking :
On Thu, 19 May 2005 18:22:32 GMT, "Leo Lichtman"
wrote:


"Grant Erwin" wrote: (clip) Anyone know what this tool is, and what craft
uses it? (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Yep. The answer is right on it. It's a Yankee screwdriver. If the toolset
in the handle were complete, it would include a couple of screwdriver bits,
along with the drill bits. It supposedly would be used by people in the
wood crafts, like carpenters and cabinet makers. I have seen them in
collections, tool sales and flea markets, but I have never known of one
actually being used. As a screwdriver it's not too good, because the bit
tends to slip out of the slot as it spins, and when it does, the rest of the
stroke drives it into the wood.


I inherited several from my dad as well. One was a spring loaded drill
only, with bit storage in the handle. The other was screwdriver only.
The drill worked rather well on wood.


The original cordless portable drill (as opposed to the larger bit &
brace.)

Never ever hold the work in your hand when using the screwdriver
one...you will leak all over the place and it really hurts...

Sigh..I learned that when I was 11.


I see you got the point about safety.

tschus
pyotr


--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
Niccol wrote "It used to be that the USA was pretty good at
producing stuff teenaged boys could lose a finger or two playing with."


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