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Default Beware Allstate

Beware Allstate. My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.
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When I was looking for homeowners insurance one insurance company
refused to even quote me unless I could get my roof "certified". When
I researched exactly what that means, it would require me to get a new
roof. Like I'm going to replace a perfectly good roof just to get
insurance??
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"zzyzzx" wrote in message
...
When I was looking for homeowners insurance one insurance company
refused to even quote me unless I could get my roof "certified". When
I researched exactly what that means, it would require me to get a new
roof. Like I'm going to replace a perfectly good roof just to get
insurance??



I'll bet that insurance company would have insured you if you signed a
certified, notarized legal document stating that you would never file a
claim against them as long as you were insured with them.


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Default Beware Allstate

On Apr 16, 10:04*am, Frank wrote:
Beware Allstate. *My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. *Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. *We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. *I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. *If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.


Must be where you live. I've had Allstate for 22 years, and my house
was built in the early 1800s. My house has practically nothing "to
code", but I had no problem when I had a water damage claim. There was
damage to the electical wires which were not "up to code", so Allstate
paid to re-wire the damaged area and replace all the outlets and
switches. They didn't cover the plumbing, because that's what caused
the damage. They did, however, pay me thousands to repair the
electric, re-plaster a ceiling, replace a wall and two rooms of
hardwood floors, paint, wallpaper, etc.
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On Apr 16, 9:04*am, Frank wrote:
Beware Allstate. *My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. *Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. *We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. *I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. *If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.


They insured you and had alot of opertunities to inform you your roof
was wrong and didnt, but it wasnt when it was built, im sure there is
a state board you can complain to and small claims court.
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"Conner" wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 11:19:49 -0400, "Conner" wrote:


wrote in message
...
On Apr 16, 10:04 am, Frank wrote:
Beware Allstate. My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.


Wind can certainly peel off a roof, particularly if it isn't really
nailed down well. Our code is 6 nails per shingle, no staples.


I'm very aware of what wind can do. As I said, I have 30+ years in the
trades. I also live in the Midwest, which is frequented by tornadoes. I
also had many dealings with insurance, in contracting for damage
assessment. I've contracted on government jobs, which involves heavy
detailed specifications, including the size of a fastener head.

You'll note the OP complaining about paying for a _new_ roof. I've seen
this literally probably a hundred times. People think insurance is for
maintenance. I'd lay money on it, the roofers are telling the OP he needs
a new roof, and probably so, because of the age, not because of the
damage.


You are correct...I agree completely...






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I have Allstate Homeowners Insurance. I have a tile roof on all of my house
except a second story bedroom with a flat roof with a rubber membrane
approximately 18 x 25 feet. This roof and the tile were installed 21 years
ago. On Jan. 4 a hugh gust of wind got under the flat roof and ripped it
off completely. It went over the top of the tile roof and landed in my
front yard ripping off a number of tile along the way. This same tile is no
longer available. At first they were going to take good tile from the back
of the house to repair the front side and find some tile similar for the
back side. I objected and asked for a complete new roof. After some
discussion, they agreed and replaced the entire roof.

At no time was there ever any question about the roof not being up to the
current code although the replacement roof appears to me to be a much better
installation than the roof being replaced. I mentioned this to my roofer
and his answer was basically what you were told, the method of installation
is much better today than 21 years ago. The cost to Allstate was $2,000.00
more than I paid for the house in 1970.

Several years ago I had water damage to the hardwood floor in the kitchen
due to a leak from the dishwasher. They replaced the entire floor at no
cost to me. My experience with Allstate in the settlement of these claims
has been to my complete satisfaction.

Don in Tracy, Calif.



"Frank" wrote in message
...
Beware Allstate. My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.





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Default Beware Allstate


"Frank" wrote in message
...
Beware Allstate. My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. Now I have wind damage and they will not
cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship
with
the glue strip. I've had several roofers tell me that this is the
way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. If
this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm
putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never
return.


Allstate ads say they give you two good hands.

It sounds like you got one finger.

Bob-tx


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On Apr 16, 9:04 am, Frank wrote:
Beware Allstate. My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.


40 yrs ago, when Sears owned Allstate a wife I had at the
time...settled claims over the phone for them.
If a department paid out a lower amount than the rest for the
month...they were taken out to dinner.
Customer satisfaction wasn't at the top of their list at the time.
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Default Beware Allstate

Frank wrote:

Beware Allstate. My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.


What, exactly, is the issue with nailing? Not on nailing line? Wrong
type of nail? Too few nails?
How severe was the wind on the day it was damaged? Other damage in the
neighborhood? If
the code changed, what is the change?

Other roofers might be blowing smoke at ya'. If the install was bad, it
should not have lasted 15
years. We had shingle problems with our condo which were evident almost
immediately
- bad choice of shingle to replace concrete tiles
(first mistake). Installed in January (second mistake). Insufficient
ventillation (third mistake). Bad
nailing (fourth, and most important mistake). We have steep mansards on
portions of our goofy
roof .... the city changed the requirements for tabbed shingles after
problems like ours appreared.
After two major reworks, and a few minor ones, tabs were glued down over
most of the roof and
withstood the near-hurricane winds in '04 or '05.

Through all the back-and-forth to get our roof in good shape, I studied
the warranty and installation
instructions for the shingles. There was a registration process for the
installation to cover the warranty
and the roofer had taken care of that. There was a scheduled,
diminishing value applied but that may
have more to do with insurance. Don't know. The warranty was, I
believe, good up to 70 mph wind.
More than 70 and I guess it is an insurance issue, not a warranty
issue. If the installation was faulty,
then it appears to be an installer problem, but after 15 years..........?
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On Apr 16, 11:48*am, "Joseph Meehan"
wrote:
* * I suggest contacting your state insurance oversight authority and see
what they say. * Keep in mind your roof is at or close to the end of its
useful life (15 years?) * You also may want to contact your local agent.

* * How long have you been insured with Allstate? * Was your roof the only
one in the area damaged?

* * Have you looked carefully at the coverage document to see if what they
are saying is not consistent with what you find there?



I agree. I'd examine the policy and see exactly what it says. It
would seem very unusual for there to be exclusions for something not
up to current code. That would mean the instant the code changed, you
would no longer have coverage. And who could expect a homeowner to
even know what the current code is?

But also key is the overall condition of the roof at 15 years, how
high the wind was, were other homes damaged, etc. We also don't know
how extensive the damage is. Unless it's extensive, the insurance
company is probably only responsible to repair the damaged sections.

If the policy doesn't have any exclusion and the facts support your
case, next steps are state regulatory agency and then possibly small
claims court.






"Frank" wrote in message

...

Beware Allstate. *My house was built in 1993 and met all building
codes at that time. *Now I have wind damage and they will not cover
damage because the roof is not up to current code. *We are simply
talking about the nailing strip on a single and its relationship with
the glue strip. *I've had several roofers tell me that this is the way
roofs were put on at the time and the code has changed since. *If this
is allowed then I'm not sure it pays to have insurance. I'm putting on
a new roof out of my pocket and leaving Allstate and will never return.


--
Joseph Meehan

*Dia 's Muire duit


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Default Beware Allstate

There are many different forms of homeowners insurance, and many
different ways of covering roofs. The simplest for the homeowner is
also the most expensive -- cover all roof repairs at replacement cost.

But some policies cover only the depreciated value of the old roof, even
on a policy that otherwise pays replacement cost for home repairs. The
company doesn't want to pay for routine re-roofing as an insurance
claim.

Some policies pay only to repair or replace to original condition, and
either limit or exclude the cost of complying with stricter codes.
(That's not limited to roofs, it applies to any repair to the home, e.g.
if you have a small fire in the kitchen but the city makes you upgrade
the wiring as a condition of the repair permit, you could be on the hook
for the cost of the upgrades.)

I would strongly suggest the OP read his policy carefully to see what it
covers on his roof, what it excludes, what valuation methods it uses,
etc. If it isn't clear, an initial consultation with an attorney is
often free and well worth the price ;-)

--
is Joshua Putnam
http://www.phred.org/~josh/
Braze your own bicycle frames. See
http://www.phred.org/~josh/build/build.html
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