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Old December 26th 20, 08:13 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

Merry Christmas, everyone!
I'm looking to put a ceiling mounted heater in my garage workshop. I'm looking at models that are 5000w and 240v. Rather than hard-wiring the unit I'd like to have it corded and use the existing 240 plug I use for my table saw. Since the table saw isn't used constantly I figure I could just have the heater plugged in and swap for the table saw as needed. Is there any other concerns with swapping devices plugged in to a 240 outlet?
Most heaters that are 5000w or higher say they require being hardwired. However, there is a Dr. Infrared Heater DR-988 Garage Shop 208/240V, 4800/5600W heater that comes with a 6-30R plug factory attached.
If this one comes with a factory plug attached, why can't I buy any other "hard wired" unit and put a 240v plug on it?

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Old December 26th 20, 08:53 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 11:13:37 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

Merry Christmas, everyone!
I'm looking to put a ceiling mounted heater in my garage workshop. I'm looking at models that are 5000w and 240v. Rather than hard-wiring the unit I'd like to have it corded and use the existing 240 plug I use for my table saw. Since the table saw isn't used constantly I figure I could just have the heater plugged in and swap for the table saw as needed. Is there any other concerns with swapping devices plugged in to a 240 outlet?
Most heaters that are 5000w or higher say they require being hardwired. However, there is a Dr. Infrared Heater DR-988 Garage Shop 208/240V, 4800/5600W heater that comes with a 6-30R plug factory attached.
If this one comes with a factory plug attached, why can't I buy any other "hard wired" unit and put a 240v plug on it?


I don't see a problem with this as long as the current circuit is 10Ga
wiring with a 30A breaker. Note that the 6-30R is a 30A plug. This is
sort of circuit is a little unusual for a table saw, which are usually
connects to a 20A branch.

I have several power tools (table saw, bandsaw, and lathe) plugged
into the same 240V circuit, with the assumption that I can only use
one at a time. My dust collector is on a separate circuit of its own
because it will be used together with these tools.

The units intended to be hard wired may only have UL certification for
this use. Using them with a plug may technically be a violation of
the code. There is nothing to say that it won't work but it's not the
intended use, as long as the power doesn't exceed the capability of
the circuit.
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Old December 26th 20, 11:20 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

On 12/26/2020 1:13 PM, wrote:
Merry Christmas, everyone!
I'm looking to put a ceiling mounted heater in my garage workshop.
I'm looking at models that are 5000w and 240v. Rather than
hard-wiring the unit I'd like to have it corded and use the existing
240 plug I use for my table saw. Since the table saw isn't used
constantly I figure I could just have the heater plugged in and swap
for the table saw as needed. Is there any other concerns with
swapping devices plugged in to a 240 outlet?

Most heaters that are 5000w or higher say they require being
hardwired. However, there is a Dr. Infrared Heater DR-988 Garage
Shop 208/240V, 4800/5600W heater that comes with a 6-30R plug factory attached.
If this one comes with a factory plug attached, why can't I buy any
other "hard wired" unit and put a 240v plug on it?


You can do whatever you like; as another said it will violate the UL
listing for the other unit, but as long as the circuit is of sufficient
ampacity for the unit, it'll not be a safety hazard.

But, if it's in the garage and ceiling mounted, why wouldn't you just go
ahead and hard-wire it? If the plug is somewhere convenient that you
can swap it easily, it's going to be a fair run and leave a long cord
just hanging.

I'd suggest to "bite the bullet" and do it right.

--



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Old December 27th 20, 12:26 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

On 12/26/2020 12:13 PM, wrote:
Merry Christmas, everyone!
I'm looking to put a ceiling mounted heater in my garage workshop. I'm looking at models that are 5000w and 240v. Rather than hard-wiring the unit I'd like to have it corded and use the existing 240 plug I use for my table saw. Since the table saw isn't used constantly I figure I could just have the heater plugged in and swap for the table saw as needed. Is there any other concerns with swapping devices plugged in to a 240 outlet?
Most heaters that are 5000w or higher say they require being hardwired. However, there is a Dr. Infrared Heater DR-988 Garage Shop 208/240V, 4800/5600W heater that comes with a 6-30R plug factory attached.
If this one comes with a factory plug attached, why can't I buy any other "hard wired" unit and put a 240v plug on it?

Have you considered a heat pump? They're cheaper to run that those
heaters, and give you cooling in the summer. Something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/PIONEER-Air-C...dDbGljaz10cnVl



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Old December 27th 20, 12:32 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 16:20:05 -0600, dpb wrote:

On 12/26/2020 1:13 PM, wrote:
Merry Christmas, everyone!
I'm looking to put a ceiling mounted heater in my garage workshop.
I'm looking at models that are 5000w and 240v. Rather than
hard-wiring the unit I'd like to have it corded and use the existing
240 plug I use for my table saw. Since the table saw isn't used
constantly I figure I could just have the heater plugged in and swap
for the table saw as needed. Is there any other concerns with
swapping devices plugged in to a 240 outlet?

Most heaters that are 5000w or higher say they require being
hardwired. However, there is a Dr. Infrared Heater DR-988 Garage
Shop 208/240V, 4800/5600W heater that comes with a 6-30R plug factory attached.
If this one comes with a factory plug attached, why can't I buy any
other "hard wired" unit and put a 240v plug on it?


You can do whatever you like; as another said it will violate the UL
listing for the other unit, but as long as the circuit is of sufficient
ampacity for the unit, it'll not be a safety hazard.

But, if it's in the garage and ceiling mounted, why wouldn't you just go
ahead and hard-wire it? If the plug is somewhere convenient that you
can swap it easily, it's going to be a fair run and leave a long cord
just hanging.

I'd suggest to "bite the bullet" and do it right.


And if there's a spare circuit in the panel it can even run
independently of the dryer.

Of course I shouldn't talk--I have 80 feet of 10 gage stranded wire
running from an outlet to where I charge my car.




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Old December 27th 20, 01:35 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 11:54:02 AM UTC-8, wrote
I don't see a problem with this as long as the current circuit is 10Ga
wiring with a 30A breaker. Note that the 6-30R is a 30A plug. This is
sort of circuit is a little unusual for a table saw, which are usually
connects to a 20A branch.


It is a 20A branch so I assume 12 gauge wire.

The 240 outlet happens to be right below the perfect spot to hang a heater. The heater cord would only have to be 7 feet at the most. I'm hoping to save a few bucks by not installing a new breaker, wire, and outlet.
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Old December 27th 20, 02:59 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 16:35:01 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 11:54:02 AM UTC-8, wrote
I don't see a problem with this as long as the current circuit is 10Ga
wiring with a 30A breaker. Note that the 6-30R is a 30A plug. This is
sort of circuit is a little unusual for a table saw, which are usually
connects to a 20A branch.


It is a 20A branch so I assume 12 gauge wire.


Not enough power. 5000W/240V = 21A
You need a 30A circuit. Your plug is rated for 30A. No way around
this one.

The 240 outlet happens to be right below the perfect spot to hang a heater. The heater cord would only have to be 7 feet at the most. I'm hoping to save a few bucks by not installing a new breaker, wire, and outlet.


I doesn't matter. You don't have enough power for it.
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Old December 27th 20, 04:39 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default garage heaters

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 5:59:30 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 16:35:01 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 11:54:02 AM UTC-8, wrote
I don't see a problem with this as long as the current circuit is 10Ga
wiring with a 30A breaker. Note that the 6-30R is a 30A plug. This is
sort of circuit is a little unusual for a table saw, which are usually
connects to a 20A branch.


It is a 20A branch so I assume 12 gauge wire.

Not enough power. 5000W/240V = 21A
You need a 30A circuit. Your plug is rated for 30A. No way around
this one.

The 240 outlet happens to be right below the perfect spot to hang a heater. The heater cord would only have to be 7 feet at the most. I'm hoping to save a few bucks by not installing a new breaker, wire, and outlet.

I doesn't matter. You don't have enough power for it.


Perfect! Thanks for clarifying. Budget calls for a cheap solution, so I need to find something that is no more than 4800W. Someday I'll go big. For now I just need something that can take the chill off better than an office space heater.
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Old December 27th 20, 05:45 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 4,102
Default garage heaters

On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 19:39:06 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 5:59:30 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 16:35:01 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 11:54:02 AM UTC-8, wrote
I don't see a problem with this as long as the current circuit is 10Ga
wiring with a 30A breaker. Note that the 6-30R is a 30A plug. This is
sort of circuit is a little unusual for a table saw, which are usually
connects to a 20A branch.


It is a 20A branch so I assume 12 gauge wire.

Not enough power. 5000W/240V = 21A
You need a 30A circuit. Your plug is rated for 30A. No way around
this one.

The 240 outlet happens to be right below the perfect spot to hang a heater. The heater cord would only have to be 7 feet at the most. I'm hoping to save a few bucks by not installing a new breaker, wire, and outlet.

I doesn't matter. You don't have enough power for it.


Perfect! Thanks for clarifying. Budget calls for a cheap solution, so I need to find something that is no more than 4800W. Someday I'll go big. For now I just need something that can take the chill off better than an office space heater.

I use a 4000 watt construction heater - the orange cube. It shares an
outlet with my compressor and my arc welder. It is a fan forced unit
about 14? inches square. About 13.5 BTU output.
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Old December 27th 20, 04:36 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Posts: 14,497
Default garage heaters

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 10:39:10 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 5:59:30 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 16:35:01 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Saturday, December 26, 2020 at 11:54:02 AM UTC-8, wrote
I don't see a problem with this as long as the current circuit is 10Ga
wiring with a 30A breaker. Note that the 6-30R is a 30A plug. This is
sort of circuit is a little unusual for a table saw, which are usually
connects to a 20A branch.


It is a 20A branch so I assume 12 gauge wire.

Not enough power. 5000W/240V = 21A
You need a 30A circuit. Your plug is rated for 30A. No way around
this one.

The 240 outlet happens to be right below the perfect spot to hang a heater. The heater cord would only have to be 7 feet at the most. I'm hoping to save a few bucks by not installing a new breaker, wire, and outlet.

I doesn't matter. You don't have enough power for it.

Perfect! Thanks for clarifying. Budget calls for a cheap solution, so I need to find something that is no more than 4800W. Someday I'll go big. For now I just need something that can take the chill off better than an office space heater.


This may be too small of a solution, but I'm a big fan of the oil filled heaters.
I run mine on low 24 x 7 in my basement shop. 3 exposed concrete block walls.

Perhaps 2 or 3 of the biggest of these in various locations would be enough
to take the chill off in your garage:

Perhaps keep it on low all the time and just crank it up as needed.

https://www.amazon.com/DeLonghi-EW77.../dp/B000TGDGLU


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