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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?



Just a quick question and forgive me if it annoys you, how deep into
the wood should a screw go? A 1/3 of the width of the wood? 2/3s?

Thanks and many regards.

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Joe Barta
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

wrote:



Just a quick question and forgive me if it annoys you, how deep into
the wood should a screw go? A 1/3 of the width of the wood? 2/3s?



The correct answer is "deep enough".

All depends on what you're screwing to what. You're looking for a one
size fits all answer and there is no such thing.

Joe Barta
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Leon
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?


wrote in message
oups.com...


Just a quick question and forgive me if it annoys you, how deep into
the wood should a screw go? A 1/3 of the width of the wood? 2/3s?

Thanks and many regards.


Most screw manufacturers say 1/3 of the screw in the top piece, 2/3's of the
screw in the bottom piece.




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bent
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

---| screws are measured from the very pointy end of the tip to the flat
end on the fartherest side
---|) screws are measured from the very pointy end of the tip to the flat on
the underside. Same with machine screws, and lag bolts I believe.
generally in 1/8" increments, so don't bother looking
I constantly trim the ends off with a dremel for max penetration. Tip
rarely matters. Pre-drill is often needed
the deeper the better, esp. in end grain, mdf, particle board. I'm not
happy if I'm more than .020" away. About a 7 pieces of paper.
In machine screws fine threads are stronger than coarse, e.g nfnc.
when push comes to shove, add more depth rather than force width
wood screws come in numbers #8 is commonestly, 6, 10,12, 4, 14. smaller is
smallerestly
simialry sizes use like screwdrivers
they come in silver, gold and black
Gold ones snap, esp. the small ones. Don't use these.
Black ones rust. Don't use these either.



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bent
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

when they get longer the increment changes to 1/4", then 1/2". Don't look
for those.

The length of the unthreaded shoulder just undre the head is designed
according to an ancient recipe of a max of 1/3 third the shank length or a
minimum of n inches or whatever. Don't look. Sometimes it is better to buy
a shorter screw with more thread. Don't ask. and definelty don't ask about
washers.

The radius on the underside of the head of machine screws is controlled to a
very high tolerance also. In metal to metal contact m/c screws should have
calculations made such that enough threads are engaged so that the tensile
strength breakage point is converely supplemenatry.

The coefficient of friction, ΅, of a titanium and carbon or low allow steel,
but not corrosion resistant steel between a nut and a bolt is .08 (+/-20%)



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C&S
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

Argh I'm new to woodworking, I don't know the terminology, so bear with
me please.

I'm making a freestanding shelves unit. I'm using shelf boards that are
sold per piece, and then I'm using two rather thick and long pieces of
timber (I think it was 5cm x 8cm x 2.4m) so that I would make it stand
upright and then fit the shelves on it. To do that I'll be using those
L-shaped pieces of metal. Two for the two pieces of timber to make it
stand and not fall on its face, each one of them (the metal L-shaped
things) will be ~30cm, facing away from the wall - the shelves will be
standing against the wall but not attached to it. Then I'll use smaller
pieces of those L-shaped metals to attach the shelves to the long
pieces of timber.

My question really is about the two long pieces of timber, when I
attach the L-shaped metals to them on which the shelves will rest (and
will be screwed, but I know I'll just use 12mm screws for those because
the shelves will be 20mm and will rest on the metal anyway), how deep
into the long pieces of timber should the screws go to make sure the
shelves don't fall off, and how long should I choose the screws to be?
Should they go a 1/3 of the way in, or 2/3s?

I should say that I'll be using the shelves for books, so I expect that
they'll have to bear some weight.

Many regards and thanks.


Better questions bet better answers. That is a much better question.

20 or 22mm. Go as far as you can without coming out the other side.


Wood screws have a tapered profile and their bite come from the thread (or
depth there of). Since the very tip of the screw (the first 4mm (1/4'")or
so) is narrow the threads can't be to deep and it can't get much bite. What
I am saying is that the 1st 1/4" of screw doesn't give you any significant
holding power.

If your screw is 2 inches (5cm) long that's not really significant, if your
screw is 10mm, that's nearly half your screw.

As others have said, it's tough to comew up with a simple rule.


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Leon
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?


"bent" wrote in message
...
---| screws are measured from the very pointy end of the tip to the flat
end on the fartherest side
---|) screws are measured from the very pointy end of the tip to the flat
on the underside. Same with machine screws, and lag bolts I believe.
generally in 1/8" increments, so don't bother looking
I constantly trim the ends off with a dremel for max penetration. Tip
rarely matters. Pre-drill is often needed
the deeper the better, esp. in end grain, mdf, particle board. I'm not
happy if I'm more than .020" away. About a 7 pieces of paper.
In machine screws fine threads are stronger than coarse, e.g nfnc.
when push comes to shove, add more depth rather than force width
wood screws come in numbers #8 is commonestly, 6, 10,12, 4, 14. smaller
is smallerestly
simialry sizes use like screwdrivers
they come in silver, gold and black
Gold ones snap, esp. the small ones. Don't use these.
Black ones rust. Don't use these either.



Take a look here for good screws and a wealth of information that may be
contrary to your terminology and way of thinking.




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bent
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

actually everything about any screw you can buy is predetermined. I read
Machinerys Handbook. There are pages upon pages of indexes on everything
you could want to know. Its a book about a book. Then its a book. There
are no surprises in fasteners. Its just easier if you can just pick up one
screw that ain't gonna do it and if you have a basic knowledge you can count
the ways to get where you are going. You can shop at HD without moving your
feet. But the calculations! You ask. It gives. Before you can ask. Its
not big onn wood though, there is a bit of info. I'm not looking.



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bent
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

whats really intersting though isn't recognising that there is a 1/2"
unthreaded shoulder on all screws from e to f lengths, 3/8" before, 3/4"
after, none here, etc. but being about to recognize where the potential
breaks are. Where logic makes a U-turn - it is natural - I sold screws for
a while. This Q isn't rocket science. But you bettter beieve that it is.
You could literaly spend the rest of your life gathering info - and yes, you
would need a genius IQ just to even think about it.



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Jim K
 
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On Sat, 25 Feb 2006 02:10:29 -0500, "bent" wrote:


simialry sizes use like screwdrivers
they come in silver, gold and black
Gold ones snap, esp. the small ones. Don't use these.
Black ones rust. Don't use these either.

Color really nothing to do with material a scew is made of. You can
get black and gold steel or black and gold aluminum and the black
steel and black aluminum will behave quite differently. You have to
check for the material they are made from. Stainless steel is less
likely to rust than galvanized steel and both are less likely to snap
than an aluminum or brass screw.

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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/woodwo...-go-83202-.htm

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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4€ luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6€ screw.

Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8€ screw.
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4” luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6” screw.

Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8” screw.


A 1/2" screw for 1/4" material is bad enough.
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through
to about half the thickness of the bottom piece.
So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4” luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6” screw.
Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8” screw.


Good one.
.... I guess that good-rule-of-thumb
was just pushed into the table saw blade ! :-)
John T.



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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 8:33:11 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4€ luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6€ screw.

Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8€ screw.

A 1/2" screw for 1/4" material is bad enough.


Tom Silva suggests...

"e. To determine the appropriate size screw to use for a project,
take the thickness of the material being attached and pick a
screw thats roughly 2.5x that."

https://www.thisoldhouse.com/2109718...-decode-screws


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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On 5/5/2021 3:45 PM, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about
half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being
screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.



Actually the rule of thumb is close to 2/3's of the thickness of the
bottom piece plus the thickness of the top piece.

1" on to 2", use a 2.25 ~ 2.5" screw.

In normal measurements where the 1x is 3/4" and the 2x is 1.5" use a
1.75" screw.
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On 5/5/2021 8:50 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 8:33:11 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4€ luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6€ screw.

Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8€ screw.

A 1/2" screw for 1/4" material is bad enough.


Tom Silva suggests...

"e. To determine the appropriate size screw to use for a project,
take the thickness of the material being attached and pick a
screw thats roughly 2.5x that."

https://www.thisoldhouse.com/2109718...-decode-screws



So a screw into 3/4" material attached to another 3/4" material should
be 1-7/8" long?

LOL

I replied to the first guy, but should have added not longer than 3
times the thickness of the material to be attached.
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

hOn Wed, 05 May 2021 22:52:43 -0500, Markem618
wrote:

On Wed, 05 May 2021 21:34:58 -0400, wrote:

On Wed, 5 May 2021 18:55:19 -0600, Just Wondering wrote:

On 5/5/2021 6:48 PM,
wrote:
On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through
to about half the thickness of the bottom piece.
So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4” luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6” screw.
Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8” screw.


Good one.
... I guess that good-rule-of-thumb
was just pushed into the table saw blade ! :-)
John T.

I never heard of any such rule of thumb. Up to a certain
point, I just want my screws short enough that their points
don't protrude. If the bottom piece is thick enough, I
shoot for a screw that's at least twice as long as the
top piece's thickness. So screwing two 1" boards together
I'd go for a 1 3/4" screw. Screwing a 1" board to a 2"
board, a 2" or 2 1/2" screw. IOW, I just try to apply
a little common sense.


How do you hang sheetrock? 4/6" screws?


Till the glue dries


Wow! I don't want to be the next guy remodeling the place. I bet
you're going to hang wall paper on it too. ...and use Elmer's?

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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On Thu, 6 May 2021 10:04:07 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:

On 5/5/2021 3:45 PM, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about
half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being
screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.



Actually the rule of thumb is close to 2/3's of the thickness of the
bottom piece plus the thickness of the top piece.


OK, again assuming the 6" wall and 1/2" sheetrock, you're going to use
4-1/2" screws? The electrician and plumber aren't going to like you.

1" on to 2", use a 2.25 ~ 2.5" screw.

In normal measurements where the 1x is 3/4" and the 2x is 1.5" use a
1.75" screw.

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On 5/6/2021 9:10 AM, Leon wrote:
On 5/5/2021 8:34 PM, wrote:
On Wed, 5 May 2021 18:55:19 -0600, Just Wondering wrote:

On 5/5/2021 6:48 PM,
wrote:
On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through
to about half the thickness of the bottom piece.
So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have
a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4€ luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6€
screw.
Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8€
screw.


Good one.
...Β* I guess thatΒ* good-rule-of-thumb
Β*Β*Β*Β*Β* was just pushed into the table saw bladeΒ* !Β*Β* :-)
Β*Β*Β*Β* John T.

I never heard of any such rule of thumb.Β* Up to a certain
point, I just want my screws short enough that their points
don't protrude.Β* If the bottom piece is thick enough, I
shoot for a screw that's at least twice as long as the
top piece's thickness.Β* So screwing two 1" boards together
I'd go for a 1 3/4" screw.Β* Screwing a 1" board to a 2"
board, a 2" or 2 1/2" screw.Β* IOW, I just try to apply
a little common sense.


How do you hang sheetrock?Β* 4/6" screws?

LOL actually 6/4" screws.


For 1/2" sheetrock, 5/4" (1 1/4") is fine.

https://www.ehow.com/info_12019939_s...l-ceiling.html
https://www.dogpile.com/serp?q=what+... aYQhKWFlggB00
https://www.thespruce.com/drywall-sc...-guide-1822768
https://www.hunker.com/12190966/what...2-inch-drywall

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On Thursday, May 6, 2021 at 12:47:35 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Thu, 6 May 2021 10:04:07 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:

On 5/5/2021 3:45 PM, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about
half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being
screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.



Actually the rule of thumb is close to 2/3's of the thickness of the
bottom piece plus the thickness of the top piece.

OK, again assuming the 6" wall and 1/2" sheetrock, you're going to use
4-1/2" screws? The electrician and plumber aren't going to like you.


If the electrician's and plumber's work is impacted by the hanging of
drywall, then it's their own fault. They missed a step.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/LiO6RxYomJI/mqdefault.jpg
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Default How deep into the wood should a screw go?

On Thu, 6 May 2021 10:48:59 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, May 6, 2021 at 12:47:35 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Thu, 6 May 2021 10:04:07 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:

On 5/5/2021 3:45 PM, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about
half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being
screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.



Actually the rule of thumb is close to 2/3's of the thickness of the
bottom piece plus the thickness of the top piece.

OK, again assuming the 6" wall and 1/2" sheetrock, you're going to use
4-1/2" screws? The electrician and plumber aren't going to like you.


If the electrician's and plumber's work is impacted by the hanging of
drywall, then it's their own fault. They missed a step.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/LiO6RxYomJI/mqdefault.jpg



With 4-1/2" screws in a 6" wall there are going to be problems that
aren't the plumber's or electrician's fault. The rocker may not be
around to blame, though.


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On Thu, 06 May 2021 12:37:32 -0400, wrote:

hOn Wed, 05 May 2021 22:52:43 -0500, Markem618
wrote:

On Wed, 05 May 2021 21:34:58 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 5 May 2021 18:55:19 -0600, Just Wondering wrote:

On 5/5/2021 6:48 PM,
wrote:
On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through
to about half the thickness of the bottom piece.
So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4” luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6” screw.
Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8” screw.


Good one.
... I guess that good-rule-of-thumb
was just pushed into the table saw blade ! :-)
John T.

I never heard of any such rule of thumb. Up to a certain
point, I just want my screws short enough that their points
don't protrude. If the bottom piece is thick enough, I
shoot for a screw that's at least twice as long as the
top piece's thickness. So screwing two 1" boards together
I'd go for a 1 3/4" screw. Screwing a 1" board to a 2"
board, a 2" or 2 1/2" screw. IOW, I just try to apply
a little common sense.

How do you hang sheetrock? 4/6" screws?


Till the glue dries


Wow! I don't want to be the next guy remodeling the place. I bet
you're going to hang wall paper on it too. ...and use Elmer's?


Actually, a friend remodeled commercial office spaces, he used liquid
nail to attach 5/8" fire rated drywall to the steel wall studs.

As for the till the glue dries comment, you shooting for curmudgeon of
the year, or have you forgotten Norm of New Yankees Workshop.
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On Thu, 06 May 2021 13:46:21 -0500, Markem618
wrote:

On Thu, 06 May 2021 12:37:32 -0400, wrote:

hOn Wed, 05 May 2021 22:52:43 -0500, Markem618
wrote:

On Wed, 05 May 2021 21:34:58 -0400,
wrote:

On Wed, 5 May 2021 18:55:19 -0600, Just Wondering wrote:

On 5/5/2021 6:48 PM,
wrote:
On Wed, 5 May 2021 14:29:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:45:06 PM UTC-4, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through
to about half the thickness of the bottom piece.
So a 1" thick piece being screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.


I need to hang some 1/4” luan on a 6 x 12 beam. I guess I need a 6” screw.
Oh...wait...the bottom piece will be the luan. I only need a 1/8” screw.


Good one.
... I guess that good-rule-of-thumb
was just pushed into the table saw blade ! :-)
John T.

I never heard of any such rule of thumb. Up to a certain
point, I just want my screws short enough that their points
don't protrude. If the bottom piece is thick enough, I
shoot for a screw that's at least twice as long as the
top piece's thickness. So screwing two 1" boards together
I'd go for a 1 3/4" screw. Screwing a 1" board to a 2"
board, a 2" or 2 1/2" screw. IOW, I just try to apply
a little common sense.

How do you hang sheetrock? 4/6" screws?

Till the glue dries


Wow! I don't want to be the next guy remodeling the place. I bet
you're going to hang wall paper on it too. ...and use Elmer's?


Actually, a friend remodeled commercial office spaces, he used liquid
nail to attach 5/8" fire rated drywall to the steel wall studs.


I suppose those who do commercial demo don't have the same problems as
residential.

As for the till the glue dries comment, you shooting for curmudgeon of
the year, or have you forgotten Norm of New Yankees Workshop.


Must I admit that I know anything about Norm?
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On Thu, 6 May 2021 10:48:59 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, May 6, 2021 at 12:47:35 PM UTC-4, wrote:
On Thu, 6 May 2021 10:04:07 -0500, Leon lcb11211@swbelldotnet wrote:

On 5/5/2021 3:45 PM, jboisver wrote:
A good rule of thumb is that the screw should drive through to about
half the thickness of the bottom piece. So a 1" thick piece being
screwed to a 2" thick piece should have a 2" screw.



Actually the rule of thumb is close to 2/3's of the thickness of the
bottom piece plus the thickness of the top piece.

OK, again assuming the 6" wall and 1/2" sheetrock, you're going to use
4-1/2" screws? The electrician and plumber aren't going to like you.


If the electrician's and plumber's work is impacted by the hanging of
drywall, then it's their own fault. They missed a step.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/LiO6RxYomJI/mqdefault.jpg

A few sheet-rockers found out the hard way not to cover Merv's
boxes!!! After a few weeks on a project using his magnet box finder
and keyhole saw to find the hidden boxes and numerous warnings he
resorted to the Estwing box finder. When they had to replace repair
about 14 sheets of drywall in a single house they learned how to cut
their drywall to keep the boxes open!!! (a subdivision of 35 or so
good sized homes)
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