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Default When a gallon is not a gallon

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).
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"greg2468" wrote in message
...
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).



Everything has to be shipped, and freight rates have gone through the roof
due to the cost of oil, whose price is determined via a system best
described as off-track betting. Manufacturers have a choice to make. They
can raise their prices, or they can shrink their products. Customers vary as
far as which they'd prefer to see happen.

Why the coverage rate remains the same is beyond me. There's a toll free
number on the label. You should call that number and let us know what you
find out.


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On 02/27/08 05:49 pm greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).



Sherwin-Williams said that some of their paints are a fraction (can't
remember how much) under a gallon to leave room for the tints. And I
just checked the Pittsburgh paints we bought last week: 3 7/8 quarts,
not the full gallon; I hadn't noticed before. We're in the Midwest.

How many brands of ice cream still have full half-gallon packs? Most are
56oz. instead of 64oz.

-=-
Perce
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"greg2468" wrote in message
...
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Maybe its to leave room so they can add tint? Was it flat white or Base?

Rich


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greg2468 writes:

I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas.


Here the 1-pound can of coffee has been 13 oz for some time.


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""Blattus Slafaly 0/00 "" wrote in
message ...
Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
On 02/27/08 05:49 pm greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).



Sherwin-Williams said that some of their paints are a fraction (can't
remember how much) under a gallon to leave room for the tints. And I just
checked the Pittsburgh paints we bought last week: 3 7/8 quarts, not the
full gallon; I hadn't noticed before. We're in the Midwest.

How many brands of ice cream still have full half-gallon packs? Most are
56oz. instead of 64oz.

-=-
Perce


And a pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14 and now to
13.5 ounces. A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces even
though there was plenty of room in the tub for another ounce.
I think it's called 'bend over a little more while I shove it in a little
farther.'

--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8



I think your message is called "I've never run a business, so I don't have a
clue."


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""Blattus Slafaly 0/00 "" wrote in
message ...
Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
On 02/27/08 05:49 pm greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).



Sherwin-Williams said that some of their paints are a fraction (can't
remember how much) under a gallon to leave room for the tints. And I just
checked the Pittsburgh paints we bought last week: 3 7/8 quarts, not the
full gallon; I hadn't noticed before. We're in the Midwest.

How many brands of ice cream still have full half-gallon packs? Most are
56oz. instead of 64oz.

-=-
Perce


And a pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14 and now to
13.5 ounces. A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces even
though there was plenty of room in the tub for another ounce.
I think it's called 'bend over a little more while I shove it in a little
farther.'

--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8


Maybe that's what their using the other ounce for!!??

Rich


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In article , "JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:

Why the coverage rate remains the same is beyond me.


Perhaps if you think about it for another hour or two, you'll figure it out.

Then again, maybe you won't.

Hint: coverage is quoted in square feet per *gallon*. Not square feet per
*can*.
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clipped

-=-
Perce


And a pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14 and now to
13.5 ounces. A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces even


Interesting......is that a Walmart pound? My butter says 16 oz.

though there was plenty of room in the tub for another ounce.
I think it's called 'bend over a little more while I shove it in a little
farther.'

--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8




I think your message is called "I've never run a business, so I don't have a
clue."




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On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800 (PST), greg2468
wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


I don't follow the other products mentioned, but candy bars get
smaller and smaller and then they get bigger in one big jump and the
price goes up.

Then they start getting smaller again.

AIUI most economists think that mild inflation is good for the economy
because it encourages businesses and people do things now, but the
cost of the war will imo cause greater than mild inflation for quite a
few years.


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On Feb 27, 7:23*pm, (Doug Miller) wrote:
In article , "JoeSpareBedroom" wrote:
Why the coverage rate remains the same is beyond me.


Perhaps if you think about it for another hour or two, you'll figure it out.

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"Doug Miller" wrote in message
t...
In article , "JoeSpareBedroom"
wrote:

Why the coverage rate remains the same is beyond me.


Perhaps if you think about it for another hour or two, you'll figure it
out.

Then again, maybe you won't.

Hint: coverage is quoted in square feet per *gallon*. Not square feet per
*can*.



Good point.


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"greg2468" wrote in message
...
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Lesson: Stay away from big box stores.

My pre-mixed Ben Moore paint is still a full gallon The tintable base
though, is 126 ounces so they have room to add the tint.


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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message

A pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14...


No, it didn't.


A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces


No, it wasn't.


A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.


So be a literalist if that makes you hard. We know what the poster was
talking about.


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""Blattus Slafaly 0/00 "" wrote in
message ...
DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Feb 27, 6:47 pm, "Blattus Slafaly 0/00 "
wrote:
Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
On 02/27/08 05:49 pm greg2468 wrote:
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).
Sherwin-Williams said that some of their paints are a fraction (can't
remember how much) under a gallon to leave room for the tints. And I
just checked the Pittsburgh paints we bought last week: 3 7/8 quarts,
not the full gallon; I hadn't noticed before. We're in the Midwest.
How many brands of ice cream still have full half-gallon packs? Most
are
56oz. instead of 64oz.
-=-
Perce
And a pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14 and now to
13.5 ounces. A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces even
though there was plenty of room in the tub for another ounce.
I think it's called 'bend over a little more while I shove it in a
little farther.'

--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 7/8- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


A pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14...

No, it didn't.

A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces

No, it wasn't.

A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.


The perception will always be but the contents may vary.



Umm.....NO. These are definitions carved in stone. A pound is 16 ounces.
Period. End of discussion.




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On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains the
same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount. Same effect. I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.
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On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 17:51:25 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03
wrote:

-snip--
A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.


No it isn't. a pound of gold is only 12 ounces.

Jim
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"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains the
same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.




Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the stores by
growing wings and flying there for free.


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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 12:31:16 +0000, franz fripplfrappl wrote:

On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory
and that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that
we forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount. Same effect. I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.


I dont' think so. Sorry.
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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 13:42:53 +0000, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory
and that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers
that we forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing
containers and quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage
for goods than we were 5 or 10 years ago.




Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the
stores by growing wings and flying there for free.


It's more than transportation costs. If a supplier were to raise prices
20%, the consumer may not buy the product but go to a competitor. Keep
the packing the same in looks but smaller in size and keep prices close
to what they are, the consumer will grab the package without thinking of
increased cost. The vendor wins. The consumer thinks he/she is getting
the same goods at the same price.

Now that fuel costs are rising, we'll see more price increases, but the
smaller packages have little to do with it..

It's a marketing and a way to increase profits.


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"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 13:42:53 +0000, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).

Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory
and that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers
that we forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing
containers and quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage
for goods than we were 5 or 10 years ago.




Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the
stores by growing wings and flying there for free.


It's more than transportation costs. If a supplier were to raise prices
20%, the consumer may not buy the product but go to a competitor. Keep
the packing the same in looks but smaller in size and keep prices close
to what they are, the consumer will grab the package without thinking of
increased cost. The vendor wins. The consumer thinks he/she is getting
the same goods at the same price.

Now that fuel costs are rising, we'll see more price increases, but the
smaller packages have little to do with it..



Now that they're rising? I deal with trucking groceries all day long.
Freight costs began rising 4 years ago. I'm surprised that price increases
have lagged so far behind. It had to happen eventually.



It's a marketing and a way to increase profits.


The OP describes it as an attempt to fool people. That's bull****. What kind
of work do you do? Do you expect to get salary increases from time to time?

This reminds me of a long debate in a cooking newsgroup, in which whiners
were complaining that Breyers had shrunk their 64 oz ice cream package. This
was portrayed as evil. Some of the idiots seemed to expect Breyer's to send
a post card to every household in America, informing them of the change.


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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 14:48:04 +0000, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 13:42:53 +0000, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering
around the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there
are no longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon.
Yet, spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price
remains the same! I live in the southeast United State and am
curious to know if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are
now 28 ounces).

Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or
less the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory
and that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers
that we forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing
containers and quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage
for goods than we were 5 or 10 years ago.



Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the
stores by growing wings and flying there for free.


It's more than transportation costs. If a supplier were to raise
prices 20%, the consumer may not buy the product but go to a
competitor. Keep the packing the same in looks but smaller in size and
keep prices close to what they are, the consumer will grab the package
without thinking of increased cost. The vendor wins. The consumer
thinks he/she is getting the same goods at the same price.

Now that fuel costs are rising, we'll see more price increases, but the
smaller packages have little to do with it..



Now that they're rising? I deal with trucking groceries all day long.
Freight costs began rising 4 years ago. I'm surprised that price
increases have lagged so far behind. It had to happen eventually.



It's a marketing and a way to increase profits.


The OP describes it as an attempt to fool people. That's bull****. What
kind of work do you do? Do you expect to get salary increases from time
to time?

This reminds me of a long debate in a cooking newsgroup, in which
whiners were complaining that Breyers had shrunk their 64 oz ice cream
package. This was portrayed as evil. Some of the idiots seemed to expect
Breyer's to send a post card to every household in America, informing
them of the change.




advertising and packaging

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On Feb 28, 7:31*am, franz fripplfrappl wrote:
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:
I recently went to our favorite big box store. *While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. *They were one pint less than a gallon. *Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! *Of course the price remains the
same! *I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. *(Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. *A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. *5# of sugar is 4#. *Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. *We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. *By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount. *Same effect. *I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.


A pound of coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#.

I'm sure you meant to say "Some containers of coffee are 9 ounces" and
"Some bags of sugar are 4#"

When I walk into a coffee shop and ask for a pound of coffee, I get 16
oz. When I go to the public market and ask for a pound of sugar, I get
16 oz.

Are some stores selling 9 oz of coffee for the same price as they used
charge for a pound? Sure - but they don't call it a pound. What's the
big deal? Prices have gone up. Anybody that's "fooled" by the
marketing ploy of downsizing the containers and keeping the price the
same is just that - a fool. If you need a pound of something, buy a
pound of it.
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"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news
On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 14:48:04 +0000, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 13:42:53 +0000, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering
around the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there
are no longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon.
Yet, spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price
remains the same! I live in the southeast United State and am
curious to know if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are
now 28 ounces).

Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or
less the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory
and that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers
that we forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing
containers and quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage
for goods than we were 5 or 10 years ago.



Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the
stores by growing wings and flying there for free.

It's more than transportation costs. If a supplier were to raise
prices 20%, the consumer may not buy the product but go to a
competitor. Keep the packing the same in looks but smaller in size and
keep prices close to what they are, the consumer will grab the package
without thinking of increased cost. The vendor wins. The consumer
thinks he/she is getting the same goods at the same price.

Now that fuel costs are rising, we'll see more price increases, but the
smaller packages have little to do with it..



Now that they're rising? I deal with trucking groceries all day long.
Freight costs began rising 4 years ago. I'm surprised that price
increases have lagged so far behind. It had to happen eventually.



It's a marketing and a way to increase profits.


The OP describes it as an attempt to fool people. That's bull****. What
kind of work do you do? Do you expect to get salary increases from time
to time?

This reminds me of a long debate in a cooking newsgroup, in which
whiners were complaining that Breyers had shrunk their 64 oz ice cream
package. This was portrayed as evil. Some of the idiots seemed to expect
Breyer's to send a post card to every household in America, informing
them of the change.




advertising and packaging



Packaging: Already done. The new size is printed on the labels.

Advertising: You think manufacturers should pay for ads informing customers
of shrinking sizes?

By the way, does paint depend on any petroleum-based raw materials?


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"DerbyDad03" wrote in message
...
On Feb 28, 7:31 am, franz fripplfrappl wrote:
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains the
same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.

Next time I paint a wall, I'm going to paint only 80% of it and charge
the full amount. Same effect. I'll just have to convince customer that
the 20% unpainted looks great and is part of the decor.


A pound of coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#.

I'm sure you meant to say "Some containers of coffee are 9 ounces" and
"Some bags of sugar are 4#"

When I walk into a coffee shop and ask for a pound of coffee, I get 16
oz. When I go to the public market and ask for a pound of sugar, I get
16 oz.

Are some stores selling 9 oz of coffee for the same price as they used
charge for a pound? Sure - but they don't call it a pound. What's the
big deal? Prices have gone up. Anybody that's "fooled" by the
marketing ploy of downsizing the containers and keeping the price the
same is just that - a fool. If you need a pound of something, buy a
pound of it.

===================


These complaints come from people who think they should get regular salary
increases, but nobody else should.




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On Feb 28, 8:28*am, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 17:51:25 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

wrote:

-snip--

A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.


No it isn't. *a pound of gold is only 12 ounces.

Jim


a pound of gold is only 12 ounces

Apples and bananas, sort of.

A troy pound of gold is 12 troy ounces, while an avoirdupois pound of
gold is 16 avoirdupois ounces, but gold is never measured in
avoirdupois ounces, so a pound of gold is indeed only 12 ounces. Damn
- I just made myself dizzy!

It's kind of like a dollar only equals a dollar if we are talking
about the currency of a single country. e.g. US$1.00 CAN$1.00
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"Blattus Slafaly 0/00 " wrote:

And a pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14 and now to
13.5 ounces. A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces even
though there was plenty of room in the tub for another ounce.
I think it's called 'bend over a little more while I shove it in a
little farther.'


Yeah, I just bought a salami at Sam's. If was labeled "Yard of Beef," but
was only 18" long!

When I pointed this out to the check-out person, he said: "It's a short
three feet."

I think that was a line from the movie: "The Night They Invented Burlesque."


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DerbyDad03 wrote:

A pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14...

No, it didn't.

A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces

No, it wasn't.

A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.


And "A pint's a pound, the world around."


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In article ,
DerbyDad03 wrote:
A pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14...

No, it didn't.

A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces

No, it wasn't.

A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.



A pound of gold has only 12 ounces.


--
The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On Feb 28, 12:02*pm, (Larry W) wrote:
In article ,

DerbyDad03 wrote:
A pound of coffee went from 16 ounces to 15, then to 14...


No, it didn't.


A pound of butter I recently noticed was 15 ounces


No, it wasn't.


A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.


A pound of gold has only 12 ounces.

--
* * *The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation
* * *with the average voter. * * * * * * * * (Winston Churchill)

* Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org


That's already been pointed out...and replied to.


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greg2468 wrote:
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).


This is simply your friends at the big box store helping you...
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains the
same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).

Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.




Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the stores by
growing wings and flying there for free.


I doubt the poster thinks that at all and they gave an excellent
analogy. If he is painting a room and his cost goes up does he doesn't
paint 80% of the surfaces and try to spin it somehow that it is really a
great job. He would charge more to do the expected job.

I expect the same with products I buy. If the cost to produce goes up
then charge more. Don't shrink the size and print weasel words on the
package such as "new package but contents will perform as the old
package etc..."

I for one am tired of big box and megacorps putting so much effort into
spin.
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"George" wrote in message
...
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:

I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the
same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).
Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. 5# of sugar is 4#. Prices are more or less
the same.

It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory
and
that inflation is in check. We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.




Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the stores
by growing wings and flying there for free.

I doubt the poster thinks that at all and they gave an excellent analogy.
If he is painting a room and his cost goes up does he doesn't paint 80% of
the surfaces and try to spin it somehow that it is really a great job. He
would charge more to do the expected job.

I expect the same with products I buy. If the cost to produce goes up then
charge more. Don't shrink the size and print weasel words on the package
such as "new package but contents will perform as the old package etc..."

I for one am tired of big box and megacorps putting so much effort into
spin.



Then we're back to the heart of the matter: If you ran a paint company, how
would you inform customers that the cans no longer contained a gallon?


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Here in Canada, paint used to come in Canadian gallons, 160 ounces. When we
went metric they downsized the cans to 4 litres. Now we get paint in US
gallons which is smaller again, reduced in size to allow for adding tints. I
still have an old 160 ounce can, it towers over the tiny US gallon cans we
now get.

PS: The price per can never went down, only up.

"greg2468" wrote in message
...
I recently went to our favorite big box store. While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. They were one pint less than a gallon. Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! Of course the price remains
the same! I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know
if this has happened in other areas. (Quarts are now 28 ounces).



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On Feb 28, 12:21*pm, George wrote:
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"franz fripplfrappl" wrote in message
news
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 14:49:39 -0800, greg2468 wrote:


I recently went to our favorite big box store. *While wandering around
the paint department, I noticed that most brands sold there are no
longer full gallons. *They were one pint less than a gallon. *Yet,
spread rate magically remains the same! *Of course the price remains the
same! *I live in the southeast United State and am curious to know if
this has happened in other areas. *(Quarts are now 28 ounces).
Take a walk down the aisles in a grocery store sometime. *A pound of
coffee is about 9 ounces. *5# of sugar is 4#. *Prices are more or less
the same.


It's a way to trick consumers into thinking the economy is hunky-dory and
that inflation is in check. *We're so used to buying containers that we
forget to read what's actually in them. *By downsizing containers and
quantities, we are actually paying a higher percentage for goods than we
were 5 or 10 years ago.


Another bull**** answer from someone who thinks products reach the stores by
growing wings and flying there for free.


I doubt the poster thinks that at all and they gave an excellent
analogy. If he is painting a room and his cost goes up does he doesn't
paint 80% of the surfaces and try to spin it somehow that it is really a
great job. He would charge more to do the expected job.

I expect the same with products I buy. If the cost to produce goes up
then charge more. Don't shrink the size and print weasel words on the
package such as "new package but contents will perform as the old
package etc..."

I for one am tired of big box and megacorps putting so much effort into
spin.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


The problem occurs as soon as one - just one - major company downsizes
it's package and keeps the price the same. Next, right or wrong,
every other company sees that their product is priced higher, and does
the same thing - thinking that all shoppers are ignorant enough to
simply grab the product with the lowest price without even looking at
the unit pricing. (maybe they are...)

Bottom line - If you shop by unit pricing, you don't care if the
container is 16, 13.5 or 9 oz. If they are all $1.22 an oz, then the
only question is "How much do I need?" I could care less, from a price
perspective, if the bag of coffee I bought yesterday was 16 oz and
today it's 14.5. If it was $10 yesterday and it's $10 today, they
raised the price and my 16 oz bag would have cost more - which I would
have noticed because the unit price went up. I laugh in the face of
the corporate marketing muckety-mucks who think they "fooled" me into
thinking they didn't raise the price.


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On 02/28/08 12:28 pm JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

I expect the same with products I buy. If the cost to produce goes up then
charge more. Don't shrink the size and print weasel words on the package
such as "new package but contents will perform as the old package etc..."

I for one am tired of big box and megacorps putting so much effort into
spin.


Then we're back to the heart of the matter: If you ran a paint company, how
would you inform customers that the cans no longer contained a gallon?


But wouldn't it be more honest just to raise the price rather than
reduce the size?

Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:
....

But wouldn't it be more honest just to raise the price rather than
reduce the size?



But, it is a competitive market.

--
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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 12:39:05 -0500, Blattus Slafaly 0/00 wrote:
DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Feb 28, 8:28 am, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 17:51:25 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

wrote:

-snip--

A pound is 16 oz. Always was, probably always will be.
No it isn't. a pound of gold is only 12 ounces.

Jim


a pound of gold is only 12 ounces

Apples and bananas, sort of.

A troy pound of gold is 12 troy ounces, while an avoirdupois pound of
gold is 16 avoirdupois ounces, but gold is never measured in
avoirdupois ounces, so a pound of gold is indeed only 12 ounces. Damn
- I just made myself dizzy!

It's kind of like a dollar only equals a dollar if we are talking
about the currency of a single country. e.g. US$1.00 CAN$1.00


And a barrel of oil if 40 gallons instead of 55. We took a screwing on
that barrel.

Nope. It heen been 42 gallons since the late 1800's. That a barrel
for other purposes is 55 gallons is irrelevent.

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"Percival P. Cassidy" wrote in message
...
On 02/28/08 12:28 pm JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

I expect the same with products I buy. If the cost to produce goes up
then charge more. Don't shrink the size and print weasel words on the
package such as "new package but contents will perform as the old
package etc..."

I for one am tired of big box and megacorps putting so much effort into
spin.


Then we're back to the heart of the matter: If you ran a paint company,
how would you inform customers that the cans no longer contained a
gallon?


But wouldn't it be more honest just to raise the price rather than reduce
the size?

Perce



There's the problem: It depends on how each manufacturer perceives its
customers. In this newsgroup, I've seen a couple of people say they couldn't
stomach the idea of paying $22 per gallon for paint. There's your Home
Depot/Wal Mart shopper. Me - I go to a specialty paint store and pay $30+
for Devoe or Martin-Senour because I hate painting and I only want to do the
job once and be done with it.

If a paint manufacturer is worried about their price scaring people away,
which type of shopper are they thinking about? Certainly not me.


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