Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 07:19 PM
Walter R.
 
Posts: n/a
Default How do I blow the fuse?

I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my main
panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large house and the
main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit? Can I just
turn off the main switch, short-circuit the wires, and turn the main on
again? Will this damage the Main breaker?

Thanks for your help

--
Walter
www.rationality.net
-



  #2   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 07:31 PM
Nick Hull
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Walter R." wrote:

I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my main
panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large house and the
main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit? Can I just
turn off the main switch, short-circuit the wires, and turn the main on
again? Will this damage the Main breaker?

Thanks for your help


I wouldn't short circuit anything. You could plug a light bulb in to
check the circuit, 2 bulbs for 220.

Easier is to go to Radio shack or Home Depot and buy a circuit tracer.
Plug the transmitter module into the circuit and the reciever will show
you which wire and which breaker correspond.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
reply to nickhull99(at)hotmail.com because Earthlink has screwed up my e-mail
  #3   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 08:11 PM
PipeDown
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Nick Hull" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Walter R." wrote:

I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my main
panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large house and the
main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit? Can I just
turn off the main switch, short-circuit the wires, and turn the main on
again? Will this damage the Main breaker?

Thanks for your help


I wouldn't short circuit anything. You could plug a light bulb in to
check the circuit, 2 bulbs for 220.

Easier is to go to Radio shack or Home Depot and buy a circuit tracer.
Plug the transmitter module into the circuit and the reciever will show
you which wire and which breaker correspond.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
reply to nickhull99(at)hotmail.com because Earthlink has screwed up my
e-mail


Cheaper than a signal tracer is a multimeter. simply set its dial for AC
volts and toutch the wires to measure the voltage. Turn off a breaker and
see if the voltage went to 0V. If it did, you turned off the right one.

Alternatively to a voltmeter, there are non contact voltage probes (probably
also at RS but many other places too) and you just wave it near a wire and
if it buzzes the wire is live.

Both the probe or the meter can be bought for less than $20 and sometimes
much less.


  #4   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 08:16 PM
Pagan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Walter R." wrote in message
...
I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my main
panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large house and the
main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit? Can I just
turn off the main switch, short-circuit the wires, and turn the main on
again? Will this damage the Main breaker?


It might just burn down your house, or seriously damage your wiring. Best
not to short circuit anything.

Thanks for your help


To find a circuit the cheap and easy way, find a friend, plug a light in the
socket, and have your friend tell you when it goes on (or off) when you flip
the breakers or pull the fuses, one at a time of course.

No light, or it's a 220v circuit, you can do the same thing, but instead use
a tester, which can be bought for about $10 at Sears. It's the size of a
thick pen, and there are no contacts. You simply hold it close to the
socket, and when there's power running to it, it lights up and beeps. This
is also a good tool to verify a circuit is dead before fiddling with it, in
case you need to replace a switch or a socket in the future.

If this is an old house, and/or you don't know exactly what you are doing, I
strongly recommend you find an experienced electrician to do your electrical
work. It is depressingly easy to get thrown across the room or killed.

Pagan


  #5   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 08:22 PM
Phil Munro
 
Posts: n/a
Default

PipeDown wrote:

"Nick Hull" wrote in message
...

In article ,
"Walter R." wrote:

I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my main
panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large house and the
main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit? Can I just
turn off the main switch, short-circuit the wires, and turn the main on
again? Will this damage the Main breaker?

Thanks for your help


I wouldn't short circuit anything. You could plug a light bulb in to
check the circuit, 2 bulbs for 220.

Easier is to go to Radio shack or Home Depot and buy a circuit tracer.
Plug the transmitter module into the circuit and the reciever will show
you which wire and which breaker correspond.

Cheaper than a signal tracer is a multimeter. simply set its dial for AC
volts and toutch the wires to measure the voltage. Turn off a breaker and
see if the voltage went to 0V. If it did, you turned off the right one.

Alternatively to a voltmeter, there are non contact voltage probes (probably
also at RS but many other places too) and you just wave it near a wire and
if it buzzes the wire is live.

Both the probe or the meter can be bought for less than $20 and sometimes
much less.

And of course note that a STOVE probably has a 40 to 60 amp breaker
which would a rarity in your panel. Most of the breakers will be 15
or 20 amps. --Phil

--
Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
Youngstown State University
Youngstown, Ohio 44555


  #6   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 08:25 PM
Joseph Meehan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Pagan wrote:
"Walter R." wrote in message
...
I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my
main panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large
house and the main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A
service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit? Can I
just turn off the main switch, short-circuit the wires, and turn the
main on again? Will this damage the Main breaker?


It might just burn down your house, or seriously damage your wiring.
Best not to short circuit anything.

Thanks for your help


To find a circuit the cheap and easy way, find a friend, plug a light
in the socket, and have your friend tell you when it goes on (or off)
when you flip the breakers or pull the fuses, one at a time of course.


Or if you don't have a friend, use a radio turned up loud. BTW either
way always turn it back on to verify it, then off again. I was once
depending on this idea and had the light bulb burn out at the wrong time.
It was interesting and it taught me to always double check.


No light, or it's a 220v circuit, you can do the same thing, but
instead use a tester, which can be bought for about $10 at Sears.
It's the size of a thick pen, and there are no contacts. You simply
hold it close to the socket, and when there's power running to it, it
lights up and beeps. This is also a good tool to verify a circuit is
dead before fiddling with it, in case you need to replace a switch or
a socket in the future.

If this is an old house, and/or you don't know exactly what you are
doing, I strongly recommend you find an experienced electrician to do
your electrical work. It is depressingly easy to get thrown across
the room or killed.

Pagan


--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit


  #7   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 09:30 PM
Tim Fischer
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Most of the existing replies seem to be ignoring/ignorant of the fact that
the OP is talking about a STOVE with #6 wires. There's no way to plug in a
light, radio, etc. etc or even use a Radio Shack circuit tracer without more
work and risk than the OP should take, if he's asking this question.

Simple answer: As someone else pointed out, it will be a large, double-pole
breaker. You can immediately rule out all the single-pole breakers. Then,
follow the following steps:

1) Turn off Main
2) Separate the wires, making sure you have two exposed bare ends (but not
touching!)
3) Turn on main, and with a neon tester (cheap $3 gizmo available anywhere)
confirm there is power on the wires. This will also ensure you're using the
tester properly (If no power now -- STOP, you're either doing something
wrong, or the wire is disconnected from the panel.
4) Now, turn off all double-pole breakers. Confirm there is NOT power at
the wires. (If there is STOP).
5) Now, turn on each double-pole breaker one by one until the tester lights
up. That's your breaker.

Works best with 2 people within hollering distance (or cell phones/etc) but
can be done with one person if you don't mind many trips back and forth to
the panel.

This is the cheapest safe method to do the job. It's very safe if you
follow the above exactly and never touch the wires unless you've confirmed
they are dead with the tester (even then, avoid touching them).

-Tim


  #8   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 09:35 PM
Doug Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , "Walter R." wrote:
I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my main
panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large house and the
main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit?


Ummm... why not take the cover off the panel, and see which breaker those #6
red and black wires go to?

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #9   Report Post  
Old July 13th 05, 09:43 PM
Duane Bozarth
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Doug Miller wrote:

In article , "Walter R." wrote:
I want to identify a circuit breaker for a disconnected stove in my main
panel (looks like # 6 red and black wires). This is a large house and the
main panel is a maze of wires and breakers (200 A service).

How can I tell which breaker controls this particular circuit?


Ummm... why not take the cover off the panel, and see which breaker those #6
red and black wires go to?


Ok if there's only one pair...
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
electrical interruption Choreboy Home Repair 41 April 17th 05 11:14 PM
Fuse and main circuit breaker rating Ro UK diy 6 January 10th 05 11:19 AM
ATX Power supply - defective fuse? RubbishRat Electronics Repair 2 July 23rd 04 12:38 PM
fuse/ power supply question or problem on amplifier ian nicoll Electronics Repair 2 September 10th 03 05:11 PM
Micrwave oven - M8A fuse? Mike Tomlinson Electronics Repair 7 August 29th 03 08:00 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:08 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017