Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket to
dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode.* It fits inside the socket
and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

************************* ****** Mikek


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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

Not since the (very) early 1970s in the US. Can you say: "Fire Hazard"?

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

On 4/13/21 9:04 AM, amdx wrote:

It is a flat device with an internal diode.


I remember those.

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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

On Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 10:04:52 AM UTC-4, wrote:
I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket to
dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode. It fits inside the socket
and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

Mikek



I haven't seen those in years. I used to use them and they worked great. I used to put them in the high fixtures over hallway stairs in some rentals I had and the bulbs lasted forever - but they only work on incandescent bulbs.
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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install


On 2021/04/13 7:04 a.m., amdx wrote:
I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket to


dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode.* It fits inside the socket
and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

************************* ****** Mikek



Here is a story from 1981 about these buttons - Bulb Miser and Light-Saver:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...-0072dc20f578/

Perhaps that will help your quest! At least you now have the names...

John :-#)#



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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

On 2021/04/13 11:55 a.m., John Robertson wrote:

On 2021/04/13 7:04 a.m., amdx wrote:
I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket to


dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode.* It fits inside the socket
and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

************************* ******* Mikek



Here is a story from 1981 about these buttons - Bulb Miser and Light-Saver:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...-0072dc20f578/




Perhaps that will help your quest! At least you now have the names...

John :-#)#


And here are some Eagle Energy Buttons on eBay:

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...on%2C&_sacat=0

John :-#)#

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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

On 13/04/2021 20:55, John Robertson wrote:



Here is a story from 1981 about these buttons - Bulb Miser and Light-Saver:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...-0072dc20f578/


Perhaps that will help your quest! At least you now have the names...

John :-#)#


Thanks for the link
In France I have never heard of such devices.
May be because at that time most lamps sockets were bayonet type.
I tried the diode in a switch but 220v smaller filaments and 50Hz
lower frequency produced an annoying blinking.
I saw the diode used in drills and heating devices.
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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

In article ,
bilou wrote:
On 13/04/2021 20:55, John Robertson wrote:



Here is a story from 1981 about these buttons - Bulb Miser and Light-Saver:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archi...-0072dc20f578/


Perhaps that will help your quest! At least you now have the names...

John :-#)#


Thanks for the link
In France I have never heard of such devices.
May be because at that time most lamps sockets were bayonet type.
I tried the diode in a switch but 220v smaller filaments and 50Hz
lower frequency produced an annoying blinking.
I saw the diode used in drills and heating devices.


As I understand it - the Bulb Miser is a thermistor (positive
temperature coefficient). It reduces the current surge into a "cold"
incandescent bulb filament, reducing the chance of a burn-out at that
time, and thus extends the life of the bulb. It does reduce the light
output and raises the operating temperature of the socket.

The Light-Saver is one of a number of diode-type "bulb savers". As I
recall, these sorts of devices do reduce the filament temperature and
thus extend the bulb's life, but they have several disadvantages:

- Greatly reduced light output (by about half)

- Reduced efficiency. Since the filament is operating at a lower
temperature, a lower percentage of its output is visible than
during normal operation, and there's (relatively) more non-
visible infrared. You get less visible light per watt.

- Radio frequency interference. The rectification effect creates
sharp edges in the current waveform, and this creates RF energy.
AM and other radio reception can suffer (buzzing, reduced
sensitivity, etc.).

- Asymmetric load on the mains. If you have a bunch of these in
use at the same time, and if the diodes all line up the same way,
the circuit will draw more current on one half of the AC waveform
than on the other. This can lead to humming and buzzing in
transformers.

Neither of these sorts of "bulb savers" are good for use with either
fluorescent or LED bulbs.

An alternative to these (if you really do insist on an incandescent
bulb) is to buy a bulb made for limited-service locations (e.g. outdoor
fixtures) which has a "130-volt" filament rating. When run on the
lower voltages that are normal, the filament runs "cool" and lasts
a lot longer than a standard bulb. You still have to accept the reduced
efficiency (lower light output per watt).

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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

On 4/13/2021 9:04 AM, amdx wrote:
I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket
to dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode.* It fits inside the socket
and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

************************* ****** Mikek


*After reading there are two types, I definitely want the diode style,
but I may not need it any longer.

I order some 15 watt bulbs, they may have the right light output. I have
a sauna, and 60 Watts is just to bright for the proper ambience.

Thanks for all the information.

************************* ******************* Mikek


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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install


I never did understand the 130 volt rated bulbs. I don't know of any
130 volt services in the US. However the voltage has been creeping up
over the years. Went from 115 to 120 and mine usually runs around 125
as measured by a meter with better than 1 % accuracy.


Many primary-feed industrial locations ran at 480/277 for lighting and motors. I remember when I was in school our drafting studio was in a former factory right on the Schuylkill in Center City. Wallplate voltage was 130V, lighting was 277, and even the ceiling fans and exhaust fans were 480V. What made it even more interesting was that the primary service to the building was 4-wire, 2-phase converted to three-phase using 'Scott-Connected' transformers, AKA 'Scott-T' transformers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott-T_transformer

In the studio, there were all kinds of warning stickers on the receptacles stating that they were at an actual 130V. And for those of us with drafting lights, lamps were supplied.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install


On 2021/04/14 9:10 a.m., amdx wrote:
On 4/13/2021 9:04 AM, amdx wrote:
I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket
to dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode.* It fits inside the socket
and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

************************* ****** Mikek


*After reading there are two types, I definitely want the diode style,
but I may not need it any longer.

I order some 15 watt bulbs, they may have the right light output. I have
a sauna, and 60 Watts is just to bright for the proper ambience.

Thanks for all the information.

************************* ******************* Mikek



Hi Mikek,

As a side note, Acorn TV (on Amazon Prime here in Canada) is
broadcasting Brokenwood mystery series (from New Zealand - great fun!)
and season 7 episode 2 (my wife and I watched last night) was about a
sauna...

Who knew these things were so dangerous! And when I was growing up one
of our family friends (ex-Fins) loved saunas and introduced us to them.

As for lighting, LED bulbs probably not a good idea so I understand
incandescent (circuits not affected by heat as much). I trust the bulb
is in a sealed enclosure to avoid corrosion...

John :-#)#

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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

On 4/14/2021 11:40 AM, John Robertson wrote:

On 2021/04/14 9:10 a.m., amdx wrote:
On 4/13/2021 9:04 AM, amdx wrote:
I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket
to dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode.* It fits inside the
socket and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

************************* ****** Mikek


**After reading there are two types, I definitely want the diode
style, but I may not need it any longer.

I order some 15 watt bulbs, they may have the right light output. I
have a sauna, and 60 Watts is just to bright for the proper ambience.

Thanks for all the information.

************************* ******************** Mikek



Hi Mikek,

As a side note, Acorn TV (on Amazon Prime here in Canada) is
broadcasting Brokenwood mystery series (from New Zealand - great fun!)
and season 7 episode 2 (my wife and I watched last night) was about a
sauna...

Who knew these things were so dangerous! And when I was growing up one
of our family friends (ex-Fins) loved saunas and introduced us to them.

As for lighting, LED bulbs probably not a good idea so I understand
incandescent (circuits not affected by heat as much). I trust the bulb
is in a sealed enclosure to avoid corrosion...

John :-#)#

*Yes, I bought a sauna bulb fixture. I really would like to mount LEDs
under the bench, but I haven't found any that have a high temp rating,
but I see LED lighting in saunas often.

I might be able to get away with LEDs under the bench, there is a large
temperature gradient in the sauna, so under the bench is much cooler.


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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install


On 2021/04/14 10:04 a.m., amdx wrote:
On 4/14/2021 11:40 AM, John Robertson wrote:

On 2021/04/14 9:10 a.m., amdx wrote:
On 4/13/2021 9:04 AM, amdx wrote:
I'm looking for the little buttons that you install in a lamp socket


to dim the bulb.

It is a flat device with an internal diode.* It fits inside the


socket and makes contact with the bulb and the socket electrode.

I have searched and can not find them.

Anyone have a good search term I can try.

************************* ****** Mikek


**After reading there are two types, I definitely want the diode
style, but I may not need it any longer.

I order some 15 watt bulbs, they may have the right light output. I
have a sauna, and 60 Watts is just to bright for the proper ambience.

Thanks for all the information.

************************* ******************** Mikek



Hi Mikek,

As a side note, Acorn TV (on Amazon Prime here in Canada) is
broadcasting Brokenwood mystery series (from New Zealand - great fun!)


and season 7 episode 2 (my wife and I watched last night) was about a
sauna...

Who knew these things were so dangerous! And when I was growing up one


of our family friends (ex-Fins) loved saunas and introduced us to them.

As for lighting, LED bulbs probably not a good idea so I understand
incandescent (circuits not affected by heat as much). I trust the bulb


is in a sealed enclosure to avoid corrosion...

John :-#)#

*Yes, I bought a sauna bulb fixture. I really would like to mount

LEDs
under the bench, but I haven't found any that have a high temp rating,
but I see LED lighting in saunas often.

I might be able to get away with LEDs under the bench, there is a large


temperature gradient in the sauna, so under the bench is much cooler.



The exterior strips should work fine, they are sealed in a silicon
rubber and have an adhesive strip on the back. Probably not stick well
to steamed up wood though. We just found a bunch of 12VDC LED strips in
some surplus stuff we bought, but wrong side of the pond for you!

https://flippers.com/catalog_oc/inde...earch=main_352

John :-#)#

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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

In article ,
says...

Many primary-feed industrial locations ran at 480/277 for lighting and motors. I remember when I was in school our drafting studio was in a former factory right on the Schuylkill in Center City. Wallplate voltage was 130V, lighting was 277, and even the ceiling fans and exhaust fans were 480V. What made it even more interesting

was that the primary service to the building was 4-wire, 2-phase converted to three-phase using 'Scott-Connected' transformers, AKA 'Scott-T' transformers.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott-T_transformer

In the studio, there were all kinds of warning stickers on the receptacles stating that they were at an actual 130V. And for those of us with drafting lights, lamps were supplied.




I worked in a large plant as an electrician/instrument technician.
Dealt alot with the 480 3 phase motors and heater circuits. We fed the
floursescent tubes with one phase to neutral for 277 volts. We did
reduce the voltage to 120 volts for the common recepticals.

There was just a small ammount of the 208 3 phase circuits. We had just
a few 120 volt filament bulb lights so did not get into those very much.

Then we got in some 380 volt ( I think that is the voltage) 3 phase
stuff from Europe. We were not told that and me and another were trying
to set up a heater controler of about 200 amps. Could not get the
thing to set up right and them measured the primary voltage and it was
about 100 volts low. After some checking found out the voltage fed to
the building was only around 380 volts for that european equipment.


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Default I'm looking for the little buttons that you install

On Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at 1:57:18 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:
In article ,
says...

Many primary-feed industrial locations ran at 480/277 for lighting and motors. I remember when I was in school our drafting studio was in a former factory right on the Schuylkill in Center City. Wallplate voltage was 130V, lighting was 277, and even the ceiling fans and exhaust fans were 480V. What made it even more interesting

was that the primary service to the building was 4-wire, 2-phase converted to three-phase using 'Scott-Connected' transformers, AKA 'Scott-T' transformers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott-T_transformer

In the studio, there were all kinds of warning stickers on the receptacles stating that they were at an actual 130V. And for those of us with drafting lights, lamps were supplied.



I worked in a large plant as an electrician/instrument technician.
Dealt alot with the 480 3 phase motors and heater circuits. We fed the
floursescent tubes with one phase to neutral for 277 volts. We did
reduce the voltage to 120 volts for the common recepticals.


The manufacturing plant I worked in had 277V for lighting circuits, and somebody miswired the outlet in my office to that circuit.

The custodian burned out three vacuum cleaners in that office, I found out later.

We'd never have known except I had to hang a picture or something and I brought in my own drill. It ran way too fast and I put a meter on the outlet.

Same plant, I got a good tingle connecting computer network cables. They were shielded bi-ax, and the connectors made good contact with my hands. The PC at one end of the line was connected backwards so chassis was hot instead of ground, but further down the line the coax was grounded to another PC. So trying to connect the two, with one cable in each hand, I completed the circuit.
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