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Old June 2nd 14, 02:42 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

Swingman wrote:
On 6/2/2014 7:21 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:
Swingman wrote:


I have used two separate cans, satin and semi-gloss, almost every
day this past week of this exact product, making stain samples for
color decisions for a client, and have not had a problem.

Call Min-Wax.

FWIW, I do not sand or scuff in between coats with this product and
have yet to have a problem.


So now you've peaked my curiosity Karl. How long do you typically
wait between coats?


For this product, I apply a thin coat and re-coat in _no more_ than
two hours, per manufacturer's specific instructions, normally 20 to
30 minutes.
I'm one of those who hates finishing so much that I actually, and
religiously, follow the manufacturer's directions to a "T".

To paraphrase their directions for recoating with this product: "if
you wait more than two hours to re-coat, you must then wait 72 hours,
then sand/scuff before re-coating."

Don't have that much time to waste ...


In the course of this entire dialog, I just became aware of one of those
perspective things. When I think of poly, I think brush application -
because that's how I usually apply poly to wood. I'm systematic in how I do
that - very wet coats, spread - not brushed on the work piece. So - (my
bad...) that's what I think of by default when poly topics come up. I guess
I haven't figured out yet, how to think outside of my own box...

Now, having finally realized that you might just be talking about spraying
with rattle cans (spraying to me of course, means a big ass compressor and
really good spray guns...), I'm suddenly struck by one of those light bulb
moments.

D'Oh - sometimes it takes so damned long for the obvious to become clear...

--

-Mike-




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Old June 2nd 14, 02:46 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On 6/2/2014 7:42 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:
Now, having finally realized that you might just be talking about spraying
with rattle cans (spraying to me of course, means a big ass compressor and
really good spray guns...), I'm suddenly struck by one of those light bulb
moments.


That was the most important part of the question the OP asked:

"Just bought a spray can of minwax polyurathane for my final coat on an
old walnut table. "

;

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Old June 2nd 14, 03:29 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On 6/2/2014 8:31 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:

Ain't it just the ****s when ya miss something so obvious...


Why we buy toilet paper by the case at CostCo.

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Old June 2nd 14, 03:31 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

Swingman wrote:
On 6/2/2014 7:42 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:
Now, having finally realized that you might just be talking about
spraying with rattle cans (spraying to me of course, means a big ass
compressor and really good spray guns...), I'm suddenly struck by
one of those light bulb moments.


That was the most important part of the question the OP asked:

"Just bought a spray can of minwax polyurathane for my final coat on
an old walnut table. "


Ain't it just the ****s when ya miss something so obvious...

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-Mike-


I think I'm getting old or something...


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Old June 2nd 14, 03:39 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

Swingman wrote:
On 6/2/2014 8:31 AM, Mike Marlow wrote:

Ain't it just the ****s when ya miss something so obvious...


Why we buy toilet paper by the case at CostCo.


And to think - people ask me what that tractor trailer parked behind the
house is all about...

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-Mike-





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Old June 3rd 14, 03:43 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Despite an old post, a relevant aspect (maybe) can be gleaned.

Stirring properly and following can instructions may have been a part of the OP's problem, but I think moisture contributed to the issue.

The OP said the wood was stored in the garage (in essence, outdoors, cold temps?), yet the work place was a "heated porch". He/she said the wood "... "feels" moist". He/she may not have allowed the wood's temp to acclimate to the work place's higher temp, hence, there may (likely?) had been slight condensation on the wood surface. I assume, quick condensation formed on the can's lid, also, apparently (again, I assume, by what the OP said) immediately after opening.

In the OP's (I assume) colder climate location, plus the garage vs heated porch immediate environment, there may have been a significant temp difference to cause some condensation, despite his/hers generally dry climate. A significant temp difference, from garage to work place, can negate the general dry climate arena.

Op said he/she had used the product, before, with no problems. What might have been the difference in the two work scenarios, circumstances.... Weather conditions, prep conditions, temp acclimation, something else, including can instructions?

Where was the poly stored? Was its temperature greatly different from the wood and/or porch area, also? ...and compare this to the previous "no problem" usage.

Sonny
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Old June 3rd 14, 06:44 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Sonny wrote:
Despite an old post, a relevant aspect (maybe) can be gleaned.

Stirring properly and following can instructions may have been a part
of the OP's problem, but I think moisture contributed to the issue.


Maybe, but...


The OP said the wood was stored in the garage (in essence, outdoors,
cold temps?), yet the work place was a "heated porch". He/she said
the wood "... "feels" moist". He/she may not have allowed the wood's
temp to acclimate to the work place's higher temp, hence, there may
(likely?) had been slight condensation on the wood surface. I
assume, quick condensation formed on the can's lid, also, apparently
(again, I assume, by what the OP said) immediately after opening.


Just to set the record... this is what my newsreader shows as the original
post (despite it being long aged...). I don't see anything in the OP that
talks about storage in the garage, heated porches, cold temps, feeling
moist, etc. Are you referencing a different post when you refer to the OP?

On Friday, February 13, 2009 12:00:36 PM UTC-6, bw wrote:
Purchased last fall, opened yesterday. Stirred as usual, looked ok.
Applied with foam brush on test piece of medium pored teak-like wood.
Set aside at room temperature and it immediately starts to look like I
coated the wood in white soap.
What the hey. After a couple hours no change. Almost looks like I painted
the wood with white lead.

I've used this produce before without problems, but it "might" be some
kind
of reaction with the wood.
The wood was purchased at a farm sale in a batch of other hard woods that
could have been over 30 years old. Some mahogany and what I thought was
teak
but I can't imagine what the heck happened.

Maybe return the can to the store and try another batch.


************* End of Included Text ******************


--

-Mike-



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Old June 3rd 14, 06:49 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 11:44:17 AM UTC-5, Mike Marlow wrote:

Mike, here's what I'm seeing, additional to the original post:

bw, the poster's follow-up posts:

"-----------------------------------------------
Doubt it, it's been very dry around here this winter. Wood stored on high
rack in garage.
Test piece was sanded as usual along the grain. Wood does "feel" moist or
greasy to touch.
It might be that I'm not that experienced with tropical wood.

Tested another piece with mineral oil and it really looks good so I'll skip
the poly."

Then he later posted:

"Excellent !! I do have a paint mixer bit, but it seemed aggressive for a
quart of poly.
My work area is a partially heated enclosed porch, the temp was lower than
RT.
My poly experience had been with "gloss" or "stain" and used right after
purchase.
Now I'm confident that poor mixing was my problem. Thanks for responding."

Sonny
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Old June 3rd 14, 06:55 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Minwax fast drying polyurethane dries to white haze

Sonny wrote:
On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 11:44:17 AM UTC-5, Mike Marlow wrote:

Mike, here's what I'm seeing, additional to the original post:

bw, the poster's follow-up posts:


Snip included text from posts that do not show up on my server...

Go figure. I looked back through the entire thread and I do not see the
posts that you included in this reply. Gotta love the way this stuff works
sometimes...

--

-Mike-





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