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  #1   Report Post  
william kossack
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

As I continue to research what lathe to buy I've made some disoveries
about the DVR

There are 3 different versions of the DVR
the first was made a couple years ago
the second was made up until recently
the insides of the frist 2 can apparently be interchanged but not with
the most recent version. Or is it that the guts can't be interchanged
or that the computer cant be interchanged? I'm not sure.

the man difference that I have been able to find is the default starting
speed on the first is 1500 rpm, on the 2nd and 3rd is 600 rpm but the
3rd can run at 100 rpm (100 rpm is really slow for a lathe). There are
some cosmetic differences in the headstock. The computer is also
supposed to be faster on the 3rd version meaning that it reacts faster
and settings can be changed maybe a bit faster.

Another difference is that I think only the 2nd and 3rd versions can be
converted to run at 240 volts. At that power the lathe has more torque
at lower speeds. Again I'm not sure about this so if anyone know
differently please fill in.

The real question is what other differences exist in the newer version
of this lathe. For example, are they making it better or more cheeply.
I have not heard too many complaints about the quality or the
capabilities of any version of the lathe. But are they fixing mistakes
or problems in the earlier versions. Or are they trying to increase
their profit margin on the product. Except for american car compainies
and microsoft!-) companies don't make changes in products just to change
them because there is cost associated with these changes and hassles in
supporting different versions in the long run....unless support is
dropped such as in the microsoft business model

I am still looking.

  #2   Report Post  
Peter Teubel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 04:13:19 GMT, william kossack wrote:

As I continue to research what lathe to buy I've made some disoveries
about the DVR


I have the most recent version. 500 RPM default starting speed, 100rpm lowest speed. Currently running on 110vac. Great lathe.
Very smooth. Lots of torque. But then again, I have an old 1500lb pattern makers lathe that I do all my roughing on, so the Nova
only gets balanced big stuff.

I like the fact that belt changes are a thing of the past. Even on my big lathe, I still have to change belt positions to stay in
the motor's narrow torque curve. There's only two things I don't care for on the DVR. 1) Speed chages are SLOW compared to a dial
or even a Reeves drive. For small stuff that requires frequent speed changes (pens and such), I switch to another lathe. 2) The
motor/drive system is proprietary. With any other lathe, you can replace the motor and/or drive controller with off-the-shelf
components. With the DVR, you're stuck with parts supplied from one vendor. Is that a problem? I dunno, but we'll see 10yrs down
the road...

Peter Teubel
Milford, MA
http://www.revolutionary-turners.com
  #3   Report Post  
Bob Pritchard
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

(100 rpm is really slow for a lathe).

I use brushing lacquer on a lot of turnings with the lathe running at 8-10 rpm.
So in my eyes a lathe that has a low end of 100rpm is running too fast.
Bob, Naugatuck Ct.
http://www.outofcontrol-woodturning.com
  #4   Report Post  
Ecnerwal
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

3rd can run at 100 rpm (100 rpm is really slow for a lathe). There are

For a lathe spinning small spindles, perhaps. Or if you've been
brainwashed into thinking that the reason cheap lathes never have a low
end below 500 RPM is a design decision based on something other than
$cheap. I go below 100 rpm just about every time I use a lathe that is
capable of doing that, and I've gotten sick and tired of lathes that are
not.

YMMV, DWYL, etc...

--
Cats, Coffee, Chocolate...vices to live by
  #6   Report Post  
william kossack
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

The entire reason for my quest for a new lathe is that my grizzly lathe
has a really small motor and I doubt that
it is 1/2 hp. I've discovered over the past year there are many turning
projects that I would like to try that I dare
not attempt on a 1/2 horse grizzly lathe. I wish I could afford
something really nice but I'm limited in space
and money. The Nova DVR would be at the max of what I should spend and
unless someone can show
me something competative within my price range I'll probably end up with
a Nova DVR.

When looking at lathes under $1,000 the problem of minimum rpm comes
into play since I want to try and turn
larger bowls.

What I'm curious about is the actual differences in the different
versions of the Nova DVR. The question
is, if I found both of the first two types used what would be a good
price to pay. Then the question is
how much benefit is there in really buying the newest version if one of
the older models is available.

I'm sorry if this is too much analysis for the purchase of only a lathe
but spending $1-2,000 is not something
I do quickly or lightly unless it happens to be something like repairing
the furnace or repairing my car so I
can get to work. After all for me it is hobby though woodworking and
turning helps in the long
run to keep me sane (raising two teenagers and work stress requires a
certain amount of therapy).

Reyd Dorakeen wrote:

the woodfast lathe in the shop goes down only to 300 something, and it isnt
a cheap lathe(unfortunately)
in article , Ecnerwal at
wrote on 1/20/04 3:14 PM:



3rd can run at 100 rpm (100 rpm is really slow for a lathe). There are


For a lathe spinning small spindles, perhaps. Or if you've been
brainwashed into thinking that the reason cheap lathes never have a low
end below 500 RPM is a design decision based on something other than
$cheap. I go below 100 rpm just about every time I use a lathe that is
capable of doing that, and I've gotten sick and tired of lathes that are
not.

YMMV, DWYL, etc...






  #7   Report Post  
Peter Teubel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 05:42:41 GMT, william kossack wrote:

The Nova DVR would be at the max of what I should spend and
unless someone can show
me something competative within my price range I'll probably end up with
a Nova DVR.

What I'm curious about is the actual differences in the different
versions of the Nova DVR. The question
is, if I found both of the first two types used what would be a good
price to pay. Then the question is
how much benefit is there in really buying the newest version if one of
the older models is available.


When the DVR first came out, people were complaining about the 250rpm slowest speed as too fast. For applying finish, I suppose
that's true. But for a big bandsawn blank, its plenty slow enough. Members of our club have turned 18" diameter by 8" thick
blanks on it (outboard) with no problems at 250rpm.

Peter Teubel
Milford, MA
http://www.revolutionary-turners.com
  #8   Report Post  
Lyn J. Mangiameli
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

I've tried to stay out of this, because I don't yet have the latest
versions of the boards and so am reluctant to talk about what I haven't
experienced. That said, there is a lot of room here for confusion and
let me try to do what I can to clarify things with what I do know.

First off, there have never been any clearly demarked "versions" of the
DVR, except for some differences in international configuration (mostly
voltage and spindle size). Multiple subtle and some not so subtle
changes have occured over time,but have never been graced with public
version designations.

The very first DVR's shipped to the US, probably under serial number
1000, has some physical differences in that they used a black plastic
end cover to the headstock and were constructed to be single voltage
lathes.One of the earliest changes was to replace that plastic cover
with a red sheet metal cover. Shortly after, the boards were changed to
offer jumpers that could be removed, that along with some minimal
wiring and plug changes would allow adapting the lathe to either 115 or
230 volts.

These early lathes all had boards and firmware configurations that set
the default speed at 1500, the speed advance by 10 and the minimum speed
at 250.On my lathe, there is no dynamic breaking, though I have heard
of some lathes of this era having that feature. I use a lathe with this
configuration, and have reported on it extensively in a review for More
Woodturning and which early drafts can be found in the archives of this
group.

These early configurations also had several accessories associated with
them, such as an extraction nut, a six inch aluminum faceplate.They did
not come with a handwheel. In response to customer feedback, Teknatool
soon dropped the extraction nut, replacing it with an improved version
of what has previously been an optional handwheel. This is a great
handwheel, that can be used on its own, or have an even larger wooden
grip added to it. Teknatool,pretty much at the same time replaced the
six inch aluminum facepate with a smaller approximately 3 inch steel
faceplate. IMO these were both good choices, and the handwheel in
particular greatly enhances the usability of the lathe.

Multiple sometimes very minor changes in software/firmware programming
have occured. The default speed was reduced from 1500 to 600 to 500. I
think this is a good direction for safety reasons, as it reduces the
chance of thoughtlessly starting up the lathe with a large blank mounted
and having it at way to high a speed. In reality, though, I have never
had a problem with my default being 1500.

The speed and steps of speed advance when you are holding down the speed
change button have been increased in both size (I believe they went from
10 up to 20) and rate of change. I can't comment on this with certainty
though, as again, I don't presently have the latest boards. The increase
in rate of speed change, is likely nice, but not really a big deal for
once you get used to the lathe, you will get pretty good at dialing in
exactly the speed you want from the beginning. Still, it is likely an
improvement for such things as speeding up the lathe quickly for
friction polishing, etc.

The reduction in minimum speed will for many be the most desirable
change with the newer boards. For people making small bowls, boxes,
spindle work, etc. the 250 speed was of little problem. However, for
those of us who like to work with large blanks, like to do deep
hollowing with cutting tools like the Profome, and most of all, like to
do low speed sanding and application of finishes, the 250 minimum speed
has significantly detracted from the usability of the lathe. If these
things are important to you, you will almost surely much prefer the 100
rpm minimum speed that is incorporated into the later boards. However,
for finish application, you will still find that 100 rpm is way too
fast. Most of us reluctantly live with this drawback to gain the other
many advantages which come with the DVR.

There are a lot of other changes that have been taking place with board
changes that few will even been aware of, at least by name. There have
been changes in speed control, current limiting, and the like, some of
which were overall improvements, others which traded one set of problems
for another.

At this particular moment, most lathes in stock will likely have boards
with software revision 4.13c. The latest software revision in the
pipeline is 4.13d. I will be obtaining within the next couple of months
the latest version of the boards and software. After a little time with
it I will then post an extended user report and update to my original
review on the DVR.

All this talk of software revisions and board changes should not, IMO,
become too much of a focus in one's purchase decision. Teknatool has
every intention of allowing existing DVR owners to be able to upgrade
their DVR with new boards or headstocks, for moderate cost. Of course
unless there is little sense in getting new boards until a significant
change in usability can be achieved. I suspect that Teknatool has not
been advertising the software revisions at this point because they are
waiting until they can present current owners with a substantial step up
in usability. For a few, the drop in minimum speed to 100 will represent
that increase in usability, but for most, and perhaps when compared to
potential changes still in the R&D pipeline, the big jump in usability
has not yet been released.

So, I will be able to speak with a bit more authority on this in a
couple of months, but for now, I'd say any of the configurations that
have a red sheet metal headstock cover plate will be quite functional,
and all versions will allow for easy upgrading in the future.

Lyn

Oh, as an aside, in that More Woodturning article are photos of the
boards exposed and half out of the headstock casting. Changing the
boards does require some time and effort, but is easily accomplished wth
a minimum of commonly available tools.

william kossack wrote:
As I continue to research what lathe to buy I've made some disoveries
about the DVR

There are 3 different versions of the DVR
the first was made a couple years ago
the second was made up until recently
the insides of the frist 2 can apparently be interchanged but not with
the most recent version. Or is it that the guts can't be interchanged
or that the computer cant be interchanged? I'm not sure.

the man difference that I have been able to find is the default starting
speed on the first is 1500 rpm, on the 2nd and 3rd is 600 rpm but the
3rd can run at 100 rpm (100 rpm is really slow for a lathe). There are
some cosmetic differences in the headstock. The computer is also
supposed to be faster on the 3rd version meaning that it reacts faster
and settings can be changed maybe a bit faster.

Another difference is that I think only the 2nd and 3rd versions can be
converted to run at 240 volts. At that power the lathe has more torque
at lower speeds. Again I'm not sure about this so if anyone know
differently please fill in.

The real question is what other differences exist in the newer version
of this lathe. For example, are they making it better or more cheeply.
I have not heard too many complaints about the quality or the
capabilities of any version of the lathe. But are they fixing mistakes
or problems in the earlier versions. Or are they trying to increase
their profit margin on the product. Except for american car compainies
and microsoft!-) companies don't make changes in products just to change
them because there is cost associated with these changes and hassles in
supporting different versions in the long run....unless support is
dropped such as in the microsoft business model

I am still looking.


  #9   Report Post  
GaryPearse
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

Writing as someone who is seriously considering buying a DVR, I really
would like to be confident that the "big jump in usability" that Lyn
anticipates is definitely going to happen.

Whilst it is encouraging to know that Teknatool intend to make upgrades
available to existing owners, if that big jump never actually materializes I
wonder whether I might be left regretting any decision to buy this lathe.

Thus, I think I will wait to see if Lyn's updated report is able to confirm
the arrival of the big jump. If it isn't, then I may have to more seriously
consider the alternatives.

Gary. (Devon,UK)

"Lyn J. Mangiameli" wrote in message
ink.net..group.
(Extract)
All this talk of software revisions and board changes should not, IMO,
become too much of a focus in one's purchase decision. Teknatool has
every intention of allowing existing DVR owners to be able to upgrade
their DVR with new boards or headstocks, for moderate cost.


For a few, the drop in minimum speed to 100 will represent
that increase in usability, but for most, and perhaps when compared to
potential changes still in the R&D pipeline, the big jump in usability
has not yet been released.

(Extract)












  #10   Report Post  
Norm
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

"GaryPearse" wrote in message ...
Writing as someone who is seriously considering buying a DVR, I really
would like to be confident that the "big jump in usability" that Lyn
anticipates is definitely going to happen.

Whilst it is encouraging to know that Teknatool intend to make upgrades
available to existing owners, if that big jump never actually materializes I
wonder whether I might be left regretting any decision to buy this lathe.

Thus, I think I will wait to see if Lyn's updated report is able to confirm
the arrival of the big jump. If it isn't, then I may have to more seriously
consider the alternatives.

Gary. (Devon,UK)



Gary,

I have one of the early vintage DVRs (1500 default / min 250 rpm) and
I sometimes lust for the newer version software, I can't say that I
NEED these upgrades The lathe does everything I have asked and does it
well. Check out this link for more info.

groups.msn.com/novaowners

Norm


  #11   Report Post  
Larry E
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

Due to the proprietary nature of the drive motor on the DVR, I too was
concerned about my investment for later years. Teknatool assured me
that DVR is their new technology and they are committed to improving
and supporting this technology. For the present, I have a 500/100 rpm
configured DVR and absolutely love it. It is going to be difficult to
justify buying another lathe unless it is for greater swing over bed.
The 240v conversion is very easy and will add torque to a lathe that
already has sufficient torque for the 14 x 7 inch bowl blanks I turn.
(I have not made the 240v conversion yet but I have the clear
instructions for the change.) I have NEVER regretted owning a DVR and
find the strengths to far outweigh the weaknesses. I, too, agree that
one of the (few) weaknesses is the slow(er) speed change. Believe me,
it is not a SHOW STOPPER! I also recommend that you join the MSN Nova
Owner's group. You will find a large contingency of Nova owners that
have expeienced every possible event known to Nova Users.
Buy and Enjoy!
Larry E

"Lyn J. Mangiameli" wrote in message link.net...
I've tried to stay out of this, because I don't yet have the latest
versions of the boards and so am reluctant to talk about what I haven't
experienced. That said, there is a lot of room here for confusion and
let me try to do what I can to clarify things with what I do know.

First off, there have never been any clearly demarked "versions" of the
DVR, except for some differences in international configuration (mostly
voltage and spindle size). Multiple subtle and some not so subtle
changes have occured over time,but have never been graced with public
version designations.

The very first DVR's shipped to the US, probably under serial number
1000, has some physical differences in that they used a black plastic
end cover to the headstock and were constructed to be single voltage
lathes.One of the earliest changes was to replace that plastic cover
with a red sheet metal cover. Shortly after, the boards were changed to
offer jumpers that could be removed, that along with some minimal
wiring and plug changes would allow adapting the lathe to either 115 or
230 volts.

These early lathes all had boards and firmware configurations that set
the default speed at 1500, the speed advance by 10 and the minimum speed
at 250.On my lathe, there is no dynamic breaking, though I have heard
of some lathes of this era having that feature. I use a lathe with this
configuration, and have reported on it extensively in a review for More
Woodturning and which early drafts can be found in the archives of this
group.

These early configurations also had several accessories associated with
them, such as an extraction nut, a six inch aluminum faceplate.They did
not come with a handwheel. In response to customer feedback, Teknatool
soon dropped the extraction nut, replacing it with an improved version
of what has previously been an optional handwheel. This is a great
handwheel, that can be used on its own, or have an even larger wooden
grip added to it. Teknatool,pretty much at the same time replaced the
six inch aluminum facepate with a smaller approximately 3 inch steel
faceplate. IMO these were both good choices, and the handwheel in
particular greatly enhances the usability of the lathe.

Multiple sometimes very minor changes in software/firmware programming
have occured. The default speed was reduced from 1500 to 600 to 500. I
think this is a good direction for safety reasons, as it reduces the
chance of thoughtlessly starting up the lathe with a large blank mounted
and having it at way to high a speed. In reality, though, I have never
had a problem with my default being 1500.

The speed and steps of speed advance when you are holding down the speed
change button have been increased in both size (I believe they went from
10 up to 20) and rate of change. I can't comment on this with certainty
though, as again, I don't presently have the latest boards. The increase
in rate of speed change, is likely nice, but not really a big deal for
once you get used to the lathe, you will get pretty good at dialing in
exactly the speed you want from the beginning. Still, it is likely an
improvement for such things as speeding up the lathe quickly for
friction polishing, etc.

The reduction in minimum speed will for many be the most desirable
change with the newer boards. For people making small bowls, boxes,
spindle work, etc. the 250 speed was of little problem. However, for
those of us who like to work with large blanks, like to do deep
hollowing with cutting tools like the Profome, and most of all, like to
do low speed sanding and application of finishes, the 250 minimum speed
has significantly detracted from the usability of the lathe. If these
things are important to you, you will almost surely much prefer the 100
rpm minimum speed that is incorporated into the later boards. However,
for finish application, you will still find that 100 rpm is way too
fast. Most of us reluctantly live with this drawback to gain the other
many advantages which come with the DVR.

There are a lot of other changes that have been taking place with board
changes that few will even been aware of, at least by name. There have
been changes in speed control, current limiting, and the like, some of
which were overall improvements, others which traded one set of problems
for another.

At this particular moment, most lathes in stock will likely have boards
with software revision 4.13c. The latest software revision in the
pipeline is 4.13d. I will be obtaining within the next couple of months
the latest version of the boards and software. After a little time with
it I will then post an extended user report and update to my original
review on the DVR.

All this talk of software revisions and board changes should not, IMO,
become too much of a focus in one's purchase decision. Teknatool has
every intention of allowing existing DVR owners to be able to upgrade
their DVR with new boards or headstocks, for moderate cost. Of course
unless there is little sense in getting new boards until a significant
change in usability can be achieved. I suspect that Teknatool has not
been advertising the software revisions at this point because they are
waiting until they can present current owners with a substantial step up
in usability. For a few, the drop in minimum speed to 100 will represent
that increase in usability, but for most, and perhaps when compared to
potential changes still in the R&D pipeline, the big jump in usability
has not yet been released.

So, I will be able to speak with a bit more authority on this in a
couple of months, but for now, I'd say any of the configurations that
have a red sheet metal headstock cover plate will be quite functional,
and all versions will allow for easy upgrading in the future.

Lyn

Oh, as an aside, in that More Woodturning article are photos of the
boards exposed and half out of the headstock casting. Changing the
boards does require some time and effort, but is easily accomplished wth
a minimum of commonly available tools.

william kossack wrote:
As I continue to research what lathe to buy I've made some disoveries
about the DVR

There are 3 different versions of the DVR
the first was made a couple years ago
the second was made up until recently
the insides of the frist 2 can apparently be interchanged but not with
the most recent version. Or is it that the guts can't be interchanged
or that the computer cant be interchanged? I'm not sure.

the man difference that I have been able to find is the default starting
speed on the first is 1500 rpm, on the 2nd and 3rd is 600 rpm but the
3rd can run at 100 rpm (100 rpm is really slow for a lathe). There are
some cosmetic differences in the headstock. The computer is also
supposed to be faster on the 3rd version meaning that it reacts faster
and settings can be changed maybe a bit faster.

Another difference is that I think only the 2nd and 3rd versions can be
converted to run at 240 volts. At that power the lathe has more torque
at lower speeds. Again I'm not sure about this so if anyone know
differently please fill in.

The real question is what other differences exist in the newer version
of this lathe. For example, are they making it better or more cheeply.
I have not heard too many complaints about the quality or the
capabilities of any version of the lathe. But are they fixing mistakes
or problems in the earlier versions. Or are they trying to increase
their profit margin on the product. Except for american car compainies
and microsoft!-) companies don't make changes in products just to change
them because there is cost associated with these changes and hassles in
supporting different versions in the long run....unless support is
dropped such as in the microsoft business model

I am still looking.

  #12   Report Post  
Jack Gray
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

How do you get the 100 rpm version of the dvr? Is it a special order?
Woodcraft shows 250 as the min. speed on their web site. I haven't been
able to find anyplace that shows the 100 rpm unit available.

jack

  #13   Report Post  
Lyn J. Mangiameli
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

The 100 rpm version is current production. Likely the Woodcraft website
has just never been updated to represent these software changes. It is
really easy to confirm in person by just seeing if the speed control can
be run down that far (on the old versions, it would just stop at 250 and
no amount of pressing on the speed reduction pad would reduce that).

If you are thinking of ordering through the mail, you could always ask
for confirmation in writing, and should an older version arrive you'd
have justification for return--of course Woodcraft gives something like
a year long satisfaction guarantee anyway.

Overall, I don't think you will have any trouble at all getting the 100
rpm version from any normally stocking dealer.

Lyn

Jack Gray wrote:
How do you get the 100 rpm version of the dvr? Is it a special order?
Woodcraft shows 250 as the min. speed on their web site. I haven't been
able to find anyplace that shows the 100 rpm unit available.

jack


  #14   Report Post  
john
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

Hi all,

I just got my new Nova DVR 3000 on monday. It's the 100rpm minimum
speed version. I have roughed out 3 bowls so far ( 1 Yew, 1 Cedar, 1
Spalted Chestnut ) and i have finished a Spalted Birch Bowl ( approx
7" diameter ) and a very out of round Sycamore Blank ( approx 10"
diameter ) and this is all with it just sitting on the top of a bench,
not even bolted down. I find it a very solidly built lathe and the
speed range is more than sufficient for my needs.

In my oppinion, it's an excellent Lathe for the money, then again its
a very big step up from the Record Power DML 24x ( 8" swing ) i used
up til now.

As soon as i get it bolted to my new steel bench i'm making i hope to
turn some larger diameter stuff. Have some very large Chunks of wet
sycamore waiting to be turned into shavings.

John
  #15   Report Post  
william kossack
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

one thing that puzzles me...

Is the board change a total change out of the computer? or is it the
replacement of a cmos chip on the board. It would seem to be more
economical to change software versions with a chip replacement (you just
have to be careful not to zap the chip or damage the pins). Ofcourse
doing it this way would also permit someone to write their own software
and install it, test it and sell and distribute it.

Also what serial numbers are the newest rev of the DVR being delivered with?

Lyn J. Mangiameli wrote:

I've tried to stay out of this, because I don't yet have the latest
versions of the boards and so am reluctant to talk about what I
haven't experienced. That said, there is a lot of room here for
confusion and let me try to do what I can to clarify things with what
I do know.

First off, there have never been any clearly demarked "versions" of
the DVR, except for some differences in international configuration
(mostly voltage and spindle size). Multiple subtle and some not so
subtle changes have occured over time,but have never been graced with
public version designations.

The very first DVR's shipped to the US, probably under serial number
1000, has some physical differences in that they used a black plastic
end cover to the headstock and were constructed to be single voltage
lathes.One of the earliest changes was to replace that plastic cover
with a red sheet metal cover. Shortly after, the boards were changed
to offer jumpers that could be removed, that along with some minimal
wiring and plug changes would allow adapting the lathe to either 115
or 230 volts.

These early lathes all had boards and firmware configurations that set
the default speed at 1500, the speed advance by 10 and the minimum
speed at 250.On my lathe, there is no dynamic breaking, though I have
heard of some lathes of this era having that feature. I use a lathe
with this configuration, and have reported on it extensively in a
review for More Woodturning and which early drafts can be found in the
archives of this group.

These early configurations also had several accessories associated
with them, such as an extraction nut, a six inch aluminum
faceplate.They did not come with a handwheel. In response to customer
feedback, Teknatool soon dropped the extraction nut, replacing it with
an improved version of what has previously been an optional handwheel.
This is a great handwheel, that can be used on its own, or have an
even larger wooden grip added to it. Teknatool,pretty much at the same
time replaced the six inch aluminum facepate with a smaller
approximately 3 inch steel faceplate. IMO these were both good
choices, and the handwheel in particular greatly enhances the
usability of the lathe.

Multiple sometimes very minor changes in software/firmware programming
have occured. The default speed was reduced from 1500 to 600 to 500.
I think this is a good direction for safety reasons, as it reduces the
chance of thoughtlessly starting up the lathe with a large blank
mounted and having it at way to high a speed. In reality, though, I
have never had a problem with my default being 1500.

The speed and steps of speed advance when you are holding down the
speed change button have been increased in both size (I believe they
went from 10 up to 20) and rate of change. I can't comment on this
with certainty though, as again, I don't presently have the latest
boards. The increase in rate of speed change, is likely nice, but not
really a big deal for once you get used to the lathe, you will get
pretty good at dialing in exactly the speed you want from the
beginning. Still, it is likely an improvement for such things as
speeding up the lathe quickly for friction polishing, etc.

The reduction in minimum speed will for many be the most desirable
change with the newer boards. For people making small bowls, boxes,
spindle work, etc. the 250 speed was of little problem. However, for
those of us who like to work with large blanks, like to do deep
hollowing with cutting tools like the Profome, and most of all, like
to do low speed sanding and application of finishes, the 250 minimum
speed has significantly detracted from the usability of the lathe. If
these things are important to you, you will almost surely much prefer
the 100 rpm minimum speed that is incorporated into the later boards.
However, for finish application, you will still find that 100 rpm is
way too fast. Most of us reluctantly live with this drawback to gain
the other many advantages which come with the DVR.

There are a lot of other changes that have been taking place with
board changes that few will even been aware of, at least by name.
There have been changes in speed control, current limiting, and the
like, some of which were overall improvements, others which traded one
set of problems for another.

At this particular moment, most lathes in stock will likely have
boards with software revision 4.13c. The latest software revision in
the pipeline is 4.13d. I will be obtaining within the next couple of
months the latest version of the boards and software. After a little
time with it I will then post an extended user report and update to my
original review on the DVR.

All this talk of software revisions and board changes should not, IMO,
become too much of a focus in one's purchase decision. Teknatool has
every intention of allowing existing DVR owners to be able to upgrade
their DVR with new boards or headstocks, for moderate cost. Of course
unless there is little sense in getting new boards until a significant
change in usability can be achieved. I suspect that Teknatool has not
been advertising the software revisions at this point because they are
waiting until they can present current owners with a substantial step
up in usability. For a few, the drop in minimum speed to 100 will
represent that increase in usability, but for most, and perhaps when
compared to potential changes still in the R&D pipeline, the big jump
in usability has not yet been released.

So, I will be able to speak with a bit more authority on this in a
couple of months, but for now, I'd say any of the configurations that
have a red sheet metal headstock cover plate will be quite functional,
and all versions will allow for easy upgrading in the future.

Lyn

Oh, as an aside, in that More Woodturning article are photos of the
boards exposed and half out of the headstock casting. Changing the
boards does require some time and effort, but is easily accomplished
wth a minimum of commonly available tools.

william kossack wrote:

As I continue to research what lathe to buy I've made some disoveries
about the DVR

There are 3 different versions of the DVR
the first was made a couple years ago
the second was made up until recently
the insides of the frist 2 can apparently be interchanged but not
with the most recent version. Or is it that the guts can't be
interchanged or that the computer cant be interchanged? I'm not sure.

the man difference that I have been able to find is the default
starting speed on the first is 1500 rpm, on the 2nd and 3rd is 600
rpm but the 3rd can run at 100 rpm (100 rpm is really slow for a
lathe). There are some cosmetic differences in the headstock. The
computer is also supposed to be faster on the 3rd version meaning
that it reacts faster and settings can be changed maybe a bit faster.

Another difference is that I think only the 2nd and 3rd versions can
be converted to run at 240 volts. At that power the lathe has more
torque at lower speeds. Again I'm not sure about this so if anyone
know differently please fill in.

The real question is what other differences exist in the newer
version of this lathe. For example, are they making it better or
more cheeply. I have not heard too many complaints about the quality
or the capabilities of any version of the lathe. But are they fixing
mistakes or problems in the earlier versions. Or are they trying to
increase their profit margin on the product. Except for american
car compainies and microsoft!-) companies don't make changes in
products just to change them because there is cost associated with
these changes and hassles in supporting different versions in the
long run....unless support is dropped such as in the microsoft
business model

I am still looking.






  #16   Report Post  
Peter Teubel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 14:31:37 GMT, william kossack wrote:

one thing that puzzles me...

Is the board change a total change out of the computer? or is it the
replacement of a cmos chip on the board. It would seem to be more
economical to change software versions with a chip replacement (you just
have to be careful not to zap the chip or damage the pins). Ofcourse
doing it this way would also permit someone to write their own software
and install it, test it and sell and distribute it.


Cool! I can just see it now...mod chips for your lathe. Put the torque curve where YOU want it...

Peter Teubel
Milford, MA
http://www.revolutionary-turners.com
  #17   Report Post  
william kossack
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?

they have replacement chips for cars to improve performance why not lathes?

Peter Teubel wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 14:31:37 GMT, william kossack wrote:



one thing that puzzles me...

Is the board change a total change out of the computer? or is it the
replacement of a cmos chip on the board. It would seem to be more
economical to change software versions with a chip replacement (you just
have to be careful not to zap the chip or damage the pins). Ofcourse
doing it this way would also permit someone to write their own software
and install it, test it and sell and distribute it.



Cool! I can just see it now...mod chips for your lathe. Put the torque curve where YOU want it...

Peter Teubel
Milford, MA
http://www.revolutionary-turners.com



  #18   Report Post  
Ken Moon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Different versions of the Nova DVR 3000?


"william kossack" wrote in message
news:t5lSb.141298$sv6.777182@attbi_s52...
SNIP
they have replacement chips for cars to improve performance why not

lathes?
================================================== =========

Don't think they would make the EPA standard for highway mileage (except
maybe the one James Johnson has that has the trailer hitch built in for
sudden transport)! {:-)

Ken Moon
Webberville, TX


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