UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
VIk VIk is offline
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

I have a sloped garden and I want to pave it. I got the first bit done by the
contractor but would like to attemp the second half myself. I am planning to
hire a digger to dug 2ft deep trench, fill it with concret to build the
holding wall. I would also like to build the wall as a fence instead of wooden
fence. I live in High Wycombe and my main concern is if 2 ft deep trench is
enough for foundation and to make a solid wall. I got the annex built and they
had similar depth for the foundation. The ground in my area is quiet solid and
stoney (sorry for the lack of word). I have attached image of the annex
foundation and the area where I plain to dig. Is it necessary for me to have
a iron skelton in the foundation ? I am not building a massvie wall but just
a single block wall 1 meter high.

Secondly since my I am paving the garden, the council said the water in my
property should drain within my property. My plan is to keep a portion of the
garden unpaved to soak the water and also run a french drain parrell to the
garden wall and holding wall in the middle of the garden. Will this be enought
to keep the garden from flooding or any rain water issues?

Thanks in advance


--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy...l-1432364-.htm


  #2   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,019
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

On 21/05/2020 15:44, VIk wrote:
I have a sloped garden and I want to pave it. I got the first bit done
by the
contractor but would like to attemp the second half myself. I am
planning to
hire a digger to dug 2ft deep trench, fill it with concret to build the
holding wall. I would also like to build the wall as a fence instead of
wooden
fence. I live in High Wycombe and my main concern is if 2 ft deep trench is
enough for foundation and to make a solid wall. I got the annex built
and they
had similar depth for the foundation. The ground in my area is quiet
solid and
stoney (sorry for the lack of word). I have attached image of the annex
foundation and the area where I plain to dig.¬* Is it necessary for me to
have
a iron skelton in the foundation ?¬* I am not building a massvie wall but
just
a single block wall 1 meter high.

Secondly since my I am paving the garden, the council said the water in my
property should drain within my property. My plan is to keep a portion
of the
garden unpaved to soak the water and also run a french drain parrell to the
garden wall and holding wall in the middle of the garden. Will this be
enought
to keep the garden from flooding or any rain water issues?
Thanks in advance


Do you mean you need a retaining wall? How high? What do you mean "the
wall as a fence"?

Rather than needing footings two feet deep, you might need to dig a
soakaway.

You don't normally put rebar in footings.
  #3   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 866
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

newshound Wrote in message:
On 21/05/2020 15:44, VIk wrote:
I have a sloped garden and I want to pave it. I got the first bit done
by the
contractor but would like to attemp the second half myself. I am
planning to
hire a digger to dug 2ft deep trench, fill it with concret to build the
holding wall. I would also like to build the wall as a fence instead of
wooden
fence. I live in High Wycombe and my main concern is if 2 ft deep trench is
enough for foundation and to make a solid wall. I got the annex built
and they
had similar depth for the foundation. The ground in my area is quiet
solid and
stoney (sorry for the lack of word). I have attached image of the annex
foundation and the area where I plain to dig. Is it necessary for me to
have
a iron skelton in the foundation ? I am not building a massvie wall but
just
a single block wall 1 meter high.

Secondly since my I am paving the garden, the council said the water in my
property should drain within my property. My plan is to keep a portion
of the
garden unpaved to soak the water and also run a french drain parrell to the
garden wall and holding wall in the middle of the garden. Will this be
enought
to keep the garden from flooding or any rain water issues?
Thanks in advance


Do you mean you need a retaining wall? How high? What do you mean "the
wall as a fence"?

Rather than needing footings two feet deep, you might need to dig a
soakaway.

You don't normally put rebar in footings.


Unless it's a retaining wall ....
--
Jimk


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,019
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

On 21/05/2020 18:30, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 21/05/2020 15:44, VIk wrote:
I have a sloped garden and I want to pave it. I got the first bit done
by the
contractor but would like to attemp the second half myself. I am
planning to
hire a digger to dug 2ft deep trench, fill it with concret to build the
holding wall. I would also like to build the wall as a fence instead of
wooden
fence. I live in High Wycombe and my main concern is if 2 ft deep trench is
enough for foundation and to make a solid wall. I got the annex built
and they
had similar depth for the foundation. The ground in my area is quiet
solid and
stoney (sorry for the lack of word). I have attached image of the annex
foundation and the area where I plain to dig. Is it necessary for me to
have
a iron skelton in the foundation ? I am not building a massvie wall but
just
a single block wall 1 meter high.

Secondly since my I am paving the garden, the council said the water in my
property should drain within my property. My plan is to keep a portion
of the
garden unpaved to soak the water and also run a french drain parrell to the
garden wall and holding wall in the middle of the garden. Will this be
enought
to keep the garden from flooding or any rain water issues?
Thanks in advance


Do you mean you need a retaining wall? How high? What do you mean "the
wall as a fence"?

Rather than needing footings two feet deep, you might need to dig a
soakaway.

You don't normally put rebar in footings.


Unless it's a retaining wall ....

Yes that might be set in the footings, but it would be there to
strengthen the wall, not the footings. And simple rebar would not do all
that much to keep the wall upright.


  #5   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 866
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

newshound Wrote in message:
On 21/05/2020 18:30, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 21/05/2020 15:44, VIk wrote:
I have a sloped garden and I want to pave it. I got the first bit done
by the
contractor but would like to attemp the second half myself. I am
planning to
hire a digger to dug 2ft deep trench, fill it with concret to build the
holding wall. I would also like to build the wall as a fence instead of
wooden
fence. I live in High Wycombe and my main concern is if 2 ft deep trench is
enough for foundation and to make a solid wall. I got the annex built
and they
had similar depth for the foundation. The ground in my area is quiet
solid and
stoney (sorry for the lack of word). I have attached image of the annex
foundation and the area where I plain to dig. Is it necessary for me to
have
a iron skelton in the foundation ? I am not building a massvie wall but
just
a single block wall 1 meter high.

Secondly since my I am paving the garden, the council said the water in my
property should drain within my property. My plan is to keep a portion
of the
garden unpaved to soak the water and also run a french drain parrell to the
garden wall and holding wall in the middle of the garden. Will this be
enought
to keep the garden from flooding or any rain water issues?
Thanks in advance


Do you mean you need a retaining wall? How high? What do you mean "the
wall as a fence"?

Rather than needing footings two feet deep, you might need to dig a
soakaway.

You don't normally put rebar in footings.


Unless it's a retaining wall ....

Yes that might be set in the footings, but it would be there to
strengthen the wall, not the footings. And simple rebar would not do all
that much to keep the wall upright.




Nearly.
It would be there to "link" the footings to the retaining wall
above it, so it all works as one mass.

Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

--
Jimk


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/


  #6   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 39,563
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

On 21/05/2020 20:55, newshound wrote:
On 21/05/2020 18:30, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 21/05/2020 15:44, VIk wrote:
I have a sloped garden and I want to pave it. I got the first bit done
by the
contractor but would like to attemp the second half myself. I am
planning to
hire a digger to dug 2ft deep trench, fill it with concret to build the
holding wall. I would also like to build the wall as a fence instead of
wooden
fence. I live in High Wycombe and my main concern is if 2 ft deep
trench is
enough for foundation and to make a solid wall. I got the annex built
and they
had similar depth for the foundation. The ground in my area is quiet
solid and
stoney (sorry for the lack of word). I have attached image of the annex
foundation and the area where I plain to dig.¬* Is it necessary for
me to
have
a iron skelton in the foundation ?¬* I am not building a massvie wall
but
just
a single block wall 1 meter high.

Secondly since my I am paving the garden, the council said the water
in my
property should drain within my property. My plan is to keep a portion
of the
garden unpaved to soak the water and also run a french drain parrell
to the
garden wall and holding wall in the middle of the garden. Will this be
enought
to keep the garden from flooding or any rain water issues?
Thanks in advance


Do you mean you need a retaining wall? How high? What do you mean "the
wall as a fence"?

Rather than needing footings two feet deep, you might need to dig a
soakaway.

You don't normally put rebar in footings.


Unless it's a retaining wall ....

Yes that might be set in the footings, but it would be there to
strengthen the wall, not the footings. And simple rebar would not do all
that much to keep the wall upright.


my advice is to use steel all the way on a retaining wall. Mine has
opened up cracks where I didnt. I used 'bow ties' in the courses

Curiously foundations are non existent but it seems to be OK anyway

--
The lifetime of any political organisation is about three years before
its been subverted by the people it tried to warn you about.

Anon.
  #7   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,624
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...


Its actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the wall upright.

Richard
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 866
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...


It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.
--
Jimk


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
  #9   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,019
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...


It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in the
detail.

Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the age by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 866
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in the
detail.


In practice it comes down to where the rebar should be placed in
the "foot" - compression Vs tension etc.


Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the age by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.


How long do they last though? 4/5mm galvanised wire strikes me as
having a finite life....


--
Jimk


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/


  #11   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,019
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

On 22/05/2020 17:39, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in the
detail.


In practice it comes down to where the rebar should be placed in
the "foot" - compression Vs tension etc.


Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the age by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.


How long do they last though? 4/5mm galvanised wire strikes me as
having a finite life....


Inland, I'd expect it to still be going strong in 100 years.
  #12   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 866
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 17:39, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in the
detail.


In practice it comes down to where the rebar should be placed in
the "foot" - compression Vs tension etc.


Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the age by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.


How long do they last though? 4/5mm galvanised wire strikes me as
having a finite life....


Inland, I'd expect it to still be going strong in 100 years.


Because?
--
Jimk


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,285
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

On 22/05/2020 17:39, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in the
detail.


In practice it comes down to where the rebar should be placed in
the "foot" - compression Vs tension etc.


Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the age by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.


How long do they last though? 4/5mm galvanised wire strikes me as
having a finite life....


everything has a finite life...even timber retaining walls ....
  #14   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall



"Jim GM4DHJ ..." wrote in message
...
On 22/05/2020 17:39, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into the
slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep the
wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in the
detail.


In practice it comes down to where the rebar should be placed in
the "foot" - compression Vs tension etc.


Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the age by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.


How long do they last though? 4/5mm galvanised wire strikes me as
having a finite life....


everything has a finite life...even timber retaining walls ....


The pyramids didnt.

  #15   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,285
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall

On 23/05/2020 08:43, Rod Speed wrote:


"Jim GM4DHJ ..." wrote in message
...
On 22/05/2020 17:39, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into
the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to
keep the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in
the
detail.

In practice it comes down to where the rebar should¬* be placed in
¬* the "foot" - compression Vs tension etc.


Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the
age by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.

How long do they last though? 4/5mm galvanised wire strikes me as
¬* having a finite life....


everything has a finite life...even timber retaining walls ....


The pyramids didnt.

everything turns to dust...eventally


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40,893
Default Sloped Garden levelling and fence wall



"Jim GM4DHJ ..." wrote in message
...
On 23/05/2020 08:43, Rod Speed wrote:


"Jim GM4DHJ ..." wrote in message
...
On 22/05/2020 17:39, Jimk wrote:
newshound Wrote in message:
On 22/05/2020 11:12, Jimk wrote:
Tricky Dicky Wrote in message:
Think L shape sections with the "foot"/footings facing away from
the retained slope, with rebar running from the footings up
through the retaining wall structure. Plenty of concrete around d
the rebar of course...

It?s actually the opposite. The L of the footings should face into
the slope so that the backfill exerts a downward force on it to keep
the wall upright.

Richard


Either is valid.

Agreed, although they are working in different ways. The devil is in
the
detail.

In practice it comes down to where the rebar should be placed in
the "foot" - compression Vs tension etc.


Round here it is common to see retaining walls built from semi-random
limestone. If they are vertical, you can to some extent judge the age
by
the amount of "bulge" from the hydrostatic pressure from the soil and
they always require rebuilding eventually. The one I build in my
garden
slopes into the ground at an angle of about 20 degrees to the vertical
and as yet (30 years) shows little sign of bulge.

Serious constructors use stone filled gabions.

How long do they last though? 4/5mm galvanised wire strikes me as
having a finite life....

.
everything has a finite life...even timber retaining walls ....


The pyramids didnt.


everything turns to dust...eventally


Wrong, as always. Everest wont.

  #17   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,560
Default UNBELIEVABLE: It's 17:43 am in Australia and the Senile Ozzietard has been out of Bed and TROLLING for OVER FOURTEEN HOURS already!!!! LOL

On Sat, 23 May 2020 17:43:38 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the trolling senile asshole's latest troll**** unread

17:43??? And you've been up and trolling since 03:19 last night, ALL NIGHT
LONG, ALL MORNING, ALL AFTERNOON, and ALL EVENING ...yet AGAIN!

LMAO

--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the 86-year-old trolling senile
cretin from Oz:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/r...d-faq.2973853/
  #18   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15,560
Default UNBELIEVABLE: It's 19:16 am in Australia and the Senile Ozzietard has been out of Bed and TROLLING for SIXTEEN HOURS already!!!! LOL

On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:16:35 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

FLUSH the trolling senile asshole's latest troll**** unread

19:16 already????? Bruhahahahahahahahahahaaa!!! ...and you've been up and
trolling since 03:19 last night, i.e. for SIXTEEN HOURS, yet AGAIN! LMAO

--
Richard addressing senile Rodent Speed:
"**** you're thick/pathetic excuse for a troll."
MID:
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cooker Hood (Extractor Fan) and Sloped Ceiling danw UK diy 0 March 28th 09 02:49 PM
Sloped/Angle routing? Norm Dresner Woodworking 5 February 16th 09 08:35 PM
sloped metal roof for a woodshed [email protected] Home Repair 10 November 21st 06 02:20 PM
Determining Crown Cutting Angle With Sloped Ceiling Jim Conway Home Repair 4 March 14th 06 02:17 PM
Drywalling horiz or vert with sloped ceiling? Sean Home Repair 8 March 22nd 05 06:11 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:22 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"