Home Repair (alt.home.repair) For all homeowners and DIYers with many experienced tradesmen. Solve your toughest home fix-it problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Sean
 
Posts: n/a
Default Drywalling horiz or vert with sloped ceiling?

I have an older commercial building that I have to drywall and it has a
sloped ceiling. (It slopes about 1/4" every foot. It starts out close to 9'8
and finishes closer to 8'10". It's a very old building). I am putting in a
40' wall right down the center. Should I hang the drywall horizontally or
vertically?
Most people seem to recommend horizontal for most drywalling, but with a
slope like that it makes things a little more interesting.
Thanks



  #2   Report Post  
calhoun
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Vertical. 10' sheets only way to not have butt joints.

"Sean" wrote in message
...
I have an older commercial building that I have to drywall and it has a
sloped ceiling. (It slopes about 1/4" every foot. It starts out close to
9'8 and finishes closer to 8'10". It's a very old building). I am putting
in a 40' wall right down the center. Should I hang the drywall horizontally
or vertically?
Most people seem to recommend horizontal for most drywalling, but with a
slope like that it makes things a little more interesting.
Thanks





  #3   Report Post  
G Henslee
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sean,

In this case hanging the drywall vertical would result in fewer joints.
If the ceiling was 8'-2" or less, horizontal would be the way.

Sean wrote:
I have an older commercial building that I have to drywall and it has a
sloped ceiling. (It slopes about 1/4" every foot. It starts out close to 9'8
and finishes closer to 8'10". It's a very old building). I am putting in a
40' wall right down the center. Should I hang the drywall horizontally or
vertically?
Most people seem to recommend horizontal for most drywalling, but with a
slope like that it makes things a little more interesting.
Thanks




  #4   Report Post  
Robert Allison
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sean wrote:
I have an older commercial building that I have to drywall and it has a
sloped ceiling. (It slopes about 1/4" every foot. It starts out close to 9'8
and finishes closer to 8'10". It's a very old building). I am putting in a
40' wall right down the center. Should I hang the drywall horizontally or
vertically?
Most people seem to recommend horizontal for most drywalling, but with a
slope like that it makes things a little more interesting.
Thanks




If it is being used for commercial purposes, then it should be
hung vertically. Almost all commercial is hung vertically.
This is partly due to code as it puts all the edges over a
stud and once fire taped, adds a little time to the fire
rating of the wall. In this case, it makes sense to do so
because of the slope, in addition to the code requirements.

--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
Georgetown, TX
  #5   Report Post  
Sean
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thanks for all the answers. Vertical it is then...
Sean.


"Sean" wrote in message
...
I have an older commercial building that I have to drywall and it has a
sloped ceiling. (It slopes about 1/4" every foot. It starts out close to
9'8 and finishes closer to 8'10". It's a very old building). I am putting
in a 40' wall right down the center. Should I hang the drywall horizontally
or vertically?
Most people seem to recommend horizontal for most drywalling, but with a
slope like that it makes things a little more interesting.
Thanks








  #6   Report Post  
jeffc
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"calhoun" wrote in message
...
Vertical. 10' sheets only way to not have butt joints.


No, that's the only way to avoid horizontal butt joints, but you will still
have vertical butt joints. The best way to hang drywall in general is to
pick the solutions that gives you the shortest total length of butt joint.
It's not at all obvious that hanging it vertically will reduce the total
lenth of butt joints. There's no way to know unless you gave the exact
dimensions of the room and then compared 2 different layouts.


  #7   Report Post  
jeffc
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"G Henslee" wrote in message
...
Sean,

In this case hanging the drywall vertical would result in fewer joints. If
the ceiling was 8'-2" or less, horizontal would be the way.


That's not true of course because they offer 4.5' wide drywall specifically
for 9' ceilings. But even so, it wouldn't necessarily be correct.


  #8   Report Post  
G Henslee
 
Posts: n/a
Default

jeffc wrote:
"G Henslee" wrote in message
...

Sean,

In this case hanging the drywall vertical would result in fewer joints. If
the ceiling was 8'-2" or less, horizontal would be the way.



That's not true of course because they offer 4.5' wide drywall specifically
for 9' ceilings. But even so, it wouldn't necessarily be correct.



I was not aware of the 4.5 material. But even so, my calculations
wouldn't necessarily be incorrect.
  #9   Report Post  
jeffc
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"G Henslee" wrote in message
...

In this case hanging the drywall vertical would result in fewer joints.
If the ceiling was 8'-2" or less, horizontal would be the way.



That's not true of course because they offer 4.5' wide drywall
specifically for 9' ceilings. But even so, it wouldn't necessarily be
correct.

I was not aware of the 4.5 material. But even so, my calculations
wouldn't necessarily be incorrect.


Well no, not necessarily. But neither would they necessarily be correct.
The correct way to do it is the way that results in the fewest butt joints,
and there is no magic guideline that will tell you that without actually
laying it out on paper and calculating it both ways.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Modeling an air heater with a massy ceiling Nick Pine Home Repair 4 January 5th 05 01:03 PM
suspended ceiling or ceil barry martin Home Repair 3 December 23rd 04 04:48 PM
Extending electrical box on ceiling fixtures?? Ray Home Repair 3 November 23rd 03 01:50 AM
slope ceiling vs raised c barry martin Home Repair 1 November 20th 03 10:20 PM
Painting of ceiling... Marcus Fox UK diy 2 November 7th 03 07:15 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:32 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"