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Old January 7th 04, 05:51 PM
mark al
 
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Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?

im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions, advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house as
oppposed to buying a new house.any views will be read with interest.

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Old January 7th 04, 06:27 PM
enuff
 
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Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?


"mark al" wrote in message
om...
im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions, advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house as
oppposed to buying a new house.any views will be read with interest.


Having owned both brand new and old I would now go for older properties. IMO
the main advantages are that they tend to be on larger plots, have larger
rooms and in many instances more substantially built which in theory makes
things like loft conversions easier etc. Also larger plots mean more room
around you, more privacy and space to "expand" with extensions at a later
date. Because of this potential I also think they are a better investment
financially. On top of this (if you can find an unmolested one) they offer
more character than most new builds.

The disadvantages will depend of the individual property. Our last one
needed rewiring, central heating, new kitchen and bath plus redecoration.
Something most "older" houses need at some point in their lives. A newer
house may not need any of these. Also IME older houses need ongoing
maintenance to stop them declining, newer houses less so.

In short older houses will cost money at some point, in all likelyhood more
than a new one. But if you buy carefully, make sure you are aware of what
you're getting into and use a good surveyor I'd go with an old house every
time.

HTH


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Old January 7th 04, 07:08 PM
Angela
 
Posts: n/a
Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?


"enuff" wrote in message
...

"mark al" wrote in message
om...
im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions,

advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house

as
oppposed to buying a new house.any views will be read with

interest.

Having owned both brand new and old I would now go for older

properties. IMO
the main advantages are that they tend to be on larger plots, have

larger
rooms and in many instances more substantially built which in

theory makes
things like loft conversions easier etc. Also larger plots mean

more room
around you, more privacy and space to "expand" with extensions at a

later
date. Because of this potential I also think they are a better

investment
financially. On top of this (if you can find an unmolested one)

they offer
more character than most new builds.

The disadvantages will depend of the individual property. Our last

one
needed rewiring, central heating, new kitchen and bath plus

redecoration.
Something most "older" houses need at some point in their lives. A

newer
house may not need any of these. Also IME older houses need ongoing
maintenance to stop them declining, newer houses less so.

In short older houses will cost money at some point, in all

likelyhood more
than a new one. But if you buy carefully, make sure you are aware

of what
you're getting into and use a good surveyor I'd go with an old

house every
time.

HTH


I absolutely agree. Much will depend on if you will have any spare
cash or whether you are pushing yourself to the financial limit. If
it's the former then buy and old house for all the good reasons
above, if it's the latter then new is best so you wont have any
maintenance expenditure

Good luck

Angela


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Old January 7th 04, 09:29 PM
Peter Parry
 
Posts: n/a
Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?

On 7 Jan 2004 09:51:09 -0800, (mark al) wrote:

im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions, advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house as
oppposed to buying a new house.


Older houses tend to be bigger and have more land associated with
them. That ends all the good points.

Of their age they are usually amongst the better examples (the rest
having fallen down /been demolished). However, foundations on all
old houses are decidedly iffy, build standards were universally poor,
insulation is a joke and things like plumbing, heating and
electricity will have been bodged over the years to varying standards
of incompetence. Whatever you do avoid the ones that have been
"improved" by surface bodge jobs and several cans of National Trust
Burnt Sienna paint. Remember if you buy a crock the loss will be
yours - surveyors learned how to avoid all responsibility years ago
and buildings insurance policies exclude "faulty workmanship" (which
basically means anything at all other than gross subsidence).

New houses (last few years) are built to higher standards (by poorer
craftsmen) and if "estate" types (Barret et al) are designed to meet
their odd perception of peoples requirements. If theirs and your
match you are OK, if not you have a problem. The worst houses, to be
avoided at all costs, are those built between about 1960 and 1985.
Dire standards and poor materials.

Best is buy the land and have a house built for you. Its also
usually cheaper and quicker.

--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
  #6   Report Post  
Old January 7th 04, 09:37 PM
IMM
 
Posts: n/a
Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?


"enuff" wrote in message
...

"mark al" wrote in message
om...
im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions, advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house as
oppposed to buying a new house.any views will be read with interest.


Having owned both brand new and old I would now go for older properties.

IMO
the main advantages are that they tend to be on larger plots, have larger
rooms and in many instances more substantially built which in theory makes
things like loft conversions easier etc. Also larger plots mean more room
around you, more privacy and space to "expand" with extensions at a later
date. Because of this potential I also think they are a better investment
financially. On top of this (if you can find an unmolested one) they offer
more character than most new builds.

The disadvantages will depend of the individual property. Our last one
needed rewiring, central heating, new kitchen and bath plus redecoration.
Something most "older" houses need at some point in their lives. A newer
house may not need any of these. Also IME older houses need ongoing
maintenance to stop them declining, newer houses less so.

In short older houses will cost money at some point, in all likelyhood

more
than a new one. But if you buy carefully, make sure you are aware of what
you're getting into and use a good surveyor I'd go with an old house

every
time.


Large new houses are available. They also have far higher insulation levels
making them more comfortable in summer and winter.


---
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.555 / Virus Database: 347 - Release Date: 23/12/2003


  #7   Report Post  
Old January 7th 04, 09:39 PM
IMM
 
Posts: n/a
Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?


"Peter Parry" wrote in message
...
On 7 Jan 2004 09:51:09 -0800, (mark al) wrote:

im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions, advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house as
oppposed to buying a new house.


Older houses tend to be bigger and have more land associated with
them. That ends all the good points.

Of their age they are usually amongst the better examples (the rest
having fallen down /been demolished). However, foundations on all
old houses are decidedly iffy, build standards were universally poor,
insulation is a joke and things like plumbing, heating and
electricity will have been bodged over the years to varying standards
of incompetence. Whatever you do avoid the ones that have been
"improved" by surface bodge jobs and several cans of National Trust
Burnt Sienna paint. Remember if you buy a crock the loss will be
yours - surveyors learned how to avoid all responsibility years ago
and buildings insurance policies exclude "faulty workmanship" (which
basically means anything at all other than gross subsidence).

New houses (last few years) are built to higher standards (by poorer
craftsmen) and if "estate" types (Barret et al) are designed to meet
their odd perception of peoples requirements. If theirs and your
match you are OK, if not you have a problem. The worst houses, to be
avoided at all costs, are those built between about 1960 and 1985.
Dire standards and poor materials.


Wow! You spoke much sense. Amazing, taking all those sensible ills.

Best is buy the land and have a house built for you. Its also
usually cheaper and quicker.


Not always the case and finding decent plot is very difficult.


---
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (
http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.555 / Virus Database: 347 - Release Date: 23/12/2003


  #8   Report Post  
Old January 7th 04, 09:40 PM
I J H
 
Posts: n/a
Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?


"Angela" wrote in message
...

"enuff" wrote in message
...

"mark al" wrote in message
om...
im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions,

advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house

as
oppposed to buying a new house.any views will be read with

interest.

Having owned both brand new and old I would now go for older

properties. IMO
the main advantages are that they tend to be on larger plots, have

larger
rooms and in many instances more substantially built which in

theory makes
things like loft conversions easier etc. Also larger plots mean

more room
around you, more privacy and space to "expand" with extensions at a

later
date. Because of this potential I also think they are a better

investment
financially. On top of this (if you can find an unmolested one)

they offer
more character than most new builds.

The disadvantages will depend of the individual property. Our last

one
needed rewiring, central heating, new kitchen and bath plus

redecoration.
Something most "older" houses need at some point in their lives. A

newer
house may not need any of these. Also IME older houses need ongoing
maintenance to stop them declining, newer houses less so.

In short older houses will cost money at some point, in all

likelyhood more
than a new one. But if you buy carefully, make sure you are aware

of what
you're getting into and use a good surveyor I'd go with an old

house every
time.

HTH


I absolutely agree. Much will depend on if you will have any spare
cash or whether you are pushing yourself to the financial limit. If
it's the former then buy and old house for all the good reasons
above, if it's the latter then new is best so you wont have any
maintenance expenditure

Good luck

Angela



All the above are vaild, but if you are a first time buyer then i guess
money will be pretty tight. In which case you may be better off with a new
property which doesn't need anything other than cosmetic changes to get it
how you want it.


  #9   Report Post  
Old January 7th 04, 09:55 PM
dg
 
Posts: n/a
Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?

Generally you buy a house to live in and not to marvel at the architecture.
What is wrong with a pre or post war semi, or a modern 60/70/80/90's house?

You buy the one with the rooms the right size for you, an appropriate
kitchen and bathroom layout, enough room to move about, and future
development adaptation potential etc etc.

Any older house will generally have more maintenance costs. But over the
period you plan to keep it you have to decide whether the 20k new house
'premium' is more than the cost of maintaining your older house. You could
buy an old house with all the maintenance done by the previous owner - so
maintenance free for the next 15 years.

Then you have to consider your day to day running costs - heating and power
supply and if the plaster will fall off your older walls everytime you
re-decorate. New hose generally cheaper to run, but again is the premium
more than you will spend on heating?

For any house, if it is structurally sound then your only real concerns are
location, access, living space and running costs. Any house from any period
has a general design style - if that style and layout is appealing to you
then that is the type of house you buy. You should not buy it just because
it is 'victorian' or 'modern'.

dg


"mark al" wrote in message
om...
im just about to buy my first house and would like opinions, advice etc
what are the pros and cons of buying a victorian/edwardian house as
oppposed to buying a new house.any views will be read with interest.


  #10   Report Post  
Old January 7th 04, 10:11 PM
Capitol
 
Posts: n/a
Default victorian/edwardian houses or new houses?


Peter Parry wrote in message ...
The worst houses, to be
avoided at all costs, are those built between about 1960 and 1985.
Dire standards and poor materials.


This bit I wouldn't agree with. If you are planning to stay for some years,
this is the period which can offer traditional cavity wall construction,
reasonable plot sizes, good wiring and plumbing, central heating designed
in, large windows and with a bit of cash are very easy to bring up to a good
standard.
Regards
Capitol




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