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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On 16/03/2014 14:52, MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.

Wire brush back to the steel, and solder it that way? The mian problem,
though, is that if the leak is due to corrosion, getting back to good
steel is likely to leave a large hole, which is going to be "fun" to
patch if all you have is normal soldering gear. You'll probably need to
use a blowtorch to get the metal hot enough to activate the flux and
melt the solder, too.

You don't need anything too drastic on the blowlamp line to braze,
though. I've seen it done it with a standard butane torch before now,
and the flux and rods are obtainable from any welding supplier.

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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

In article ,
MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


two part epoxy putty?

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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?


"MM" wrote in message
...
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


"Bakers Fluid" is used to solder zinc.


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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On 16/03/2014 15:21, John Williamson wrote:
On 16/03/2014 14:52, MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.

Wire brush back to the steel, and solder it that way? The mian problem,
though, is that if the leak is due to corrosion, getting back to good
steel is likely to leave a large hole, which is going to be "fun" to
patch if all you have is normal soldering gear. You'll probably need to
use a blowtorch to get the metal hot enough to activate the flux and
melt the solder, too.

You don't need anything too drastic on the blowlamp line to braze,
though. I've seen it done it with a standard butane torch before now,
and the flux and rods are obtainable from any welding supplier.


It should solder OK as described by John but you may need an active
(acidic) flux rather than normal rosin-based soldering flux. This one
might be OK

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/HIGH-PURIT...item35d30a2ba3

If the joint has a big hole you could wrap copper wire around it (e.g.
stripped from T&E) to help bridge the gap.

A gas-torch may be useful to achieve the required temperature unless you
have a BIG soldering iron.

Or for a less elegant solution, use "plumbers" epoxy.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Plumbers-M...item1c33e25206

(not what *I* would have called Plumbers Mait)


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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

In article ,
MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


Sugru?

Gordon
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

"MM" wrote in message
...
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and




this can is fine, apart from the leak.


ROTFLMAO

You mean that the can is ****ed.

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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?


It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


Tank filler from any good motorists store
or
Buy a new one
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

"Nthkentman" wrote in message
...

It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


Tank filler from any good motorists store
or



Buy a new one


A nice piece of advice but you are forgetting who the OP is.

He is so tight that he would not give you the steam off his ****.


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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On 16/03/2014 18:10, ARW wrote:
"MM" wrote in message
...
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and




this can is fine, apart from the leak.


ROTFLMAO

You mean that the can is ****ed.


Roughly what I was thinking, but you expressed it really well.





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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

"GB" wrote in message ...

On 16/03/2014 18:10, ARW wrote:
"MM" wrote in message
...
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and




this can is fine, apart from the leak.


ROTFLMAO

You mean that the can is ****ed.


Roughly what I was thinking, but you expressed it really well.



I regularly solder galvanised sheet with a good result using 'lead free'
plumbers solder and the appropriate flux. However be aware that I am using
new shiny plate. In your case you need to clean the galvanising thoroughly,
either by abrading with a wire wheel, or a mild acid wash.

Andrew

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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On 16/03/2014 16:46, Gordon Henderson wrote:
In article ,
MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


Sugru?

Gordon

Article about Sugru in the Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/business/...dhulchaointigh

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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

"MM" wrote in message
...
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBHdZj-qkeQ

--
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 19:49:36 +0000, polygonum
wrote:

On 16/03/2014 16:46, Gordon Henderson wrote:
In article ,
MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


Sugru?

Gordon

Article about Sugru in the Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/business/...dhulchaointigh


It's not cheap though!
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

Is it rusty inside at the join? If so then there is not much you can do, its
just like a car. its g going to carry on rusting whatever you do.

Brian

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"MM" wrote in message
...
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.





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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On Sunday, March 16, 2014 2:52:04 PM UTC, MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think

it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I

could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite

expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.


It's knackered, bin it, buy a plastic one.
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On Monday, March 17, 2014 5:35:40 PM UTC, Onetap wrote:
On Sunday, March 16, 2014 2:52:04 PM UTC, MM wrote:

It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think




it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I




could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite




expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.




It's knackered, bin it, buy a plastic one.


The zinc galvanizing is a sacrificial anode; it inhibits the corrosion of the steel until all the zinc has gone. Once the zinc has gone, it's knackered and will perforate repeatedly.

It's knackered. Bin it.
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On 17/03/2014 07:56, . wrote:
On Sun, 16 Mar 2014 19:49:36 +0000, polygonum
wrote:

On 16/03/2014 16:46, Gordon Henderson wrote:
In article ,
MM wrote:
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.

Sugru?

Gordon

Article about Sugru in the Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/business/...dhulchaointigh


It's not cheap though!

Agreed.

I am acquainted with an Apple Magsafe laptop connector that was "mended"
by someone with Sugru. It looked pretty mucky after a bit of use. The
connector failed after a year or two of intermittently working. So the
Sugru was simply an extra expense, and a delaying factor in going for
the right solution.

It is interesting, it might have its place, but I am sceptical,
especially at the price.

--
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On Mon, 17 Mar 2014 12:30:23 -0700 (PDT), Onetap
wrote:

On Monday, March 17, 2014 5:35:40 PM UTC, Onetap wrote:
On Sunday, March 16, 2014 2:52:04 PM UTC, MM wrote:

It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think




it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I




could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite




expensive and this can is fine, apart from the leak.




It's knackered, bin it, buy a plastic one.


The zinc galvanizing is a sacrificial anode; it inhibits the corrosion of the steel until all the zinc has gone. Once the zinc has gone, it's knackered and will perforate repeatedly.

It's knackered. Bin it.


That little 'exchange' just put me in mind of the very first episode
of Red Dwarf for some reason. :-)
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

On 2014-03-16, ARW wrote:
"MM" wrote in message
...
It's leaking around the spout where it joins to the can. I don't think
it's possible to solder a galvanised can, or is there some approach I
could take? I don't have access to brazing gear. New cans are quite
expensive and




this can is fine, apart from the leak.


ROTFLMAO

You mean that the can is ****ed.


Exactly. Plastic watering thingies are not expensive, keep one for
particular purposes (watering, weedkiller, herbicide).
My neighbour used weld galvanised steel into trailers. I warned him that
zinc fumes were at best poisonous. Cancer killed him. I would see him
late at night, welding, with fumes rising, like a sorcerer. Unless you
wirebrushed well back to what? 22 steel?..


--
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Default Best way to repair a galvanised watering can?

replying to Onetap, theDuck01 wrote:
Almost 6 years ago I inherited an old galvanised watering can; the only
problem was it had developed a leak in its base. A bit of wire brushing
exposed a small hole.
At first I fixed it with Araldite; this worked for a few years, but it
eventually failed.
My second attempt was with SUPER STEEL; this worked for a few more years; but
it eventually failed.
So I decided to research a soldering solution. This is what I found:

*** Use lead/tin 60:40 solder
*** Use "killed spirits" flux
*** Use a tin plate patch

Killed spirit was made by dissolving zinc in concentrated hydrochloric acid.
The internet helped with the details.
The tin plate patch was easily crafted from a tin can.

The watering can base and back of patch was cleaned. Both surfaces were
painted will killed spirit and then tinned with the solder. The patch was held
in place, heated and extra solder added.

The result was a very workable patch (see photos)
https://www.homeownershub.com/img/f9
https://www.homeownershub.com/img/fa


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