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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the
best way to repair it, or is that not viable? It is a very small hole in
the bottom. I know you used to be able to get repair kits for buckets
and kettles years ago, but I doubt if they are still available in this
throw away age.
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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 09:30:57 +0100, Broadback
wrote:

My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the
best way to repair it, or is that not viable?


# There's a hole in my watering can, dear Liza, dear Liza .... #

Doesn't quite scan, does it?

;-)

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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

On 16 Jul, 10:30, Broadback wrote:
My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the
best way to repair it, or is that not viable? It is a very small hole in
the bottom. I know you used to be able to get repair kits for buckets
and kettles years ago, but I doubt if they are still available in this
throw away age.


I believe I have such a repair kit somewhere in my granddad's box of
"things that'll come in useful if I keep them long enough". From
memory, it's just a couple of large steel washers with small holes and
a nut and bolt. I think you added paper or rubber washers between the
steel washers and the can, but nowadays I'd use a dab of silicone.

Chris
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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

On 16 Jul, 09:30, Broadback wrote:
My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the
best way to repair it, or is that not viable?


Epoxy. Buy yourself a "workshop starter pack" of a good epoxy like
West System (Axminster), as it's extremely useful all round the
workshop and well worth the fifteen(?) quid. This epoxy isn't
thickened, so it'll run happily into the corner seam to a watering
can. Clean it beforehand with a bit of acid etching (doesn't take
much) with either hydrochloric or phosphoric, then rinse.

If it's a hole in a flat plate, well away from a seam or edge, then
the traditional "pot mender" still works. This is two large washers
with small holes, a nut & bolt, and a gooey sealer on one surface.
Cork sheet used to be used, but these days a wipe of Hermetite etc.
will do.

Otherwise just wipe an Oyltite stick over the hole. Borrow one from
the stationary engine people in the newsgroup over the road.
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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

Broadback presented the following explanation :
My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the best
way to repair it, or is that not viable? It is a very small hole in the
bottom. I know you used to be able to get repair kits for buckets and kettles
years ago, but I doubt if they are still available in this throw away age.


Drill a hole through the (er..) hole. Find a nut, bolt and a couple of
washers add a couple of rubber washers (tap washers?). Better if all
these are rust proof/brass or etc..

The alternative would be to drill and fill with a small amount of car
body filler from the inside.

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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 20:14:09 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

The alternative would be to drill and fill with a small amount of car
body filler from the inside.


One more option, since it's galvanised, is to put a blob of solder on the zinc.
Nuisance if there's rust around the hole, but a nice rustproof metal-to-metal
repair otherwise.

Thomas Prufer
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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

In message , Thomas Prufer
writes
On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 20:14:09 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

The alternative would be to drill and fill with a small amount of car
body filler from the inside.


One more option, since it's galvanised, is to put a blob of solder on the zinc.
Nuisance if there's rust around the hole, but a nice rustproof metal-to-metal
repair otherwise.

Complete instructions here

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6h4LoMgqlI

--
geoff
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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

On Jul 16, 8:14*pm, Harry Bloomfield
wrote:

Drill a hole through the (er..) hole. Find a nut, bolt and a couple of
washers add a couple of rubber washers (tap washers?). Better if all
these are rust proof/brass or etc..

Brass is the last thing (other than copper) to be in contact with
zinc. Make sure they are completely electrically isolated.

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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

On 16 Jul, 20:58, Thomas Prufer
wrote:

One more option, since it's galvanised, is to put a blob of solder on the zinc.


If it were still galvanised, it wouldn't have a hole in it. I assume
this is actually a rusty margin and would be a pain to try and solder
to. If you do try it, use Baker's Fluid as a flux rather than hoping
resin multi-core will work.
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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can

On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 09:30:57 +0100, Broadback wrote:

My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the
best way to repair it, or is that not viable? It is a very small hole in
the bottom. I know you used to be able to get repair kits for buckets
and kettles years ago, but I doubt if they are still available in this
throw away age.


==================================
Make sure the can is dry. Cover the hole on the outside with a bit of
masking tape and then pour in some bitumastic paint to a depth of about
1/2". Leave to stand and the bitumastic will go solid. Store the can in a
cool place when not in use.

Cic.
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Using Ubuntu Linux
Windows shown the door
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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can


"Cicero" wrote in message
om...
On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 09:30:57 +0100, Broadback wrote:

My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the
best way to repair it, or is that not viable? It is a very small hole in
the bottom. I know you used to be able to get repair kits for buckets
and kettles years ago, but I doubt if they are still available in this
throw away age.


==================================
Make sure the can is dry. Cover the hole on the outside with a bit of
masking tape and then pour in some bitumastic paint to a depth of about
1/2". Leave to stand and the bitumastic will go solid. Store the can in a
cool place when not in use.

Cic.


Interesting, that's what Spouse did with an aluminium gallon milk pail I
keep on the step for veg. washing water to put on the growing veg.

It had developed several tiny holes, too many to repair with washers.

So far the bitumen treatment has worked extremely well.

Mary


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Default Repairing a galvanised watering can


"Mary Fisher" wrote in message
t...

"Cicero" wrote in message
om...
On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 09:30:57 +0100, Broadback wrote:

My trusty old galvanised watering can has started to leak, what is the
best way to repair it, or is that not viable? It is a very small hole in
the bottom. I know you used to be able to get repair kits for buckets
and kettles years ago, but I doubt if they are still available in this
throw away age.


==================================
Make sure the can is dry. Cover the hole on the outside with a bit of
masking tape and then pour in some bitumastic paint to a depth of about
1/2". Leave to stand and the bitumastic will go solid. Store the can in a
cool place when not in use.

Cic.


Interesting, that's what Spouse did with an aluminium gallon milk pail I
keep on the step for veg. washing water to put on the growing veg.

It had developed several tiny holes, too many to repair with washers.

So far the bitumen treatment has worked extremely well.

Mary
We once had a loft tank to store cold water in and this had rusted in the
bottom, we put a half inch layer of mortar,cement and sand , in the tank
and when set painted said tank with a thick coat of black bitumastic paint
it was still fine 10 years later



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