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Default Galvanised watering can repair

Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years old
(birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it to
rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.

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Default Galvanised watering can repair

SRT wrote:
Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years
old (birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it
to rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


plumbers solder and blowlamp/plumbers flux.
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 13:33:44 +0100, "SRT" wrote:

Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years old
(birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it to
rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


Exactly the same thing happened to mine, also galvanised, bought at
ASDA. I used a hot glue gun to force glue into the join. That was five
years ago and it's started to leak a bit again, so I'll just give it
the same treatment.

MM
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 13:36:27 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

SRT wrote:
Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years
old (birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it
to rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


plumbers solder and blowlamp/plumbers flux.


Will that "stick" to the *galvanised* can, though?

MM
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

The Natural Philosopher expressed precisely :
SRT wrote:
Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years old
(birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it to
rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


plumbers solder and blowlamp/plumbers flux.


That will not 'take' on a galv finish. I don't think they even solder
them when new - I think they just fold the base/sides together, then
rely on the galv dip to provide the final seal.

I would be inclined to suggest running some paint around the inside
lip, hoping it were thin enough to make its way into the leak point and
seal it.

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk




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Default Galvanised watering can repair


"MM" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 13:33:44 +0100, "SRT" wrote:

Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years old
(birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it
to
rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


A bead of butyl sealant around the joint from the inside



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Default Galvanised watering can repair



"TMC" wrote in message ...


"MM" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 13:33:44 +0100, "SRT" wrote:

Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years old
(birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it
to
rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


A bead of butyl sealant around the joint from the inside


Thanks for the replies folks
That's me sorted for a bit this weekend - - -maybe I wont have to do much in
garden now - - - - fat chance

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Default Galvanised watering can repair


"SRT" wrote in message ...
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?


In the dark ages the fix was to take 2 steel washers, 2 rubber washers,
drill through the crack and bolt washers either side to make the seal. Don't
know whether they still sell a "kit of parts" but these bits are easy enough
to find in garage junk boxes.


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Default Galvanised watering can repair

On Apr 21, 4:25*pm, "Roger Cain"
wrote:

In the dark ages the fix was to take 2 steel washers, 2 rubber washers,
drill through the crack and bolt washers either side to make the seal.


Good fix for rust pinholes, but it won't work near a non-flat seam.

I'd dry it out well (maybe on the stove a bit) then paint the inside
with some bitumen black paint (cheap from Screwfix, dead handy). Two
coats should seal any crimped joints that have sprung open.
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

MM wrote:
On Thu, 21 Apr 2011 13:36:27 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

SRT wrote:
Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years
old (birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it
to rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.

plumbers solder and blowlamp/plumbers flux.


Will that "stick" to the *galvanised* can, though?

absolutely.

its only zinc, and that solders well.

MM



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Default Galvanised watering can repair

Harry Bloomfield wrote:
The Natural Philosopher expressed precisely :
SRT wrote:
Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years
old (birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing
it to rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


plumbers solder and blowlamp/plumbers flux.


That will not 'take' on a galv finish.


it will with an agressive flux.
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

On Thursday, 21 April 2011 13:33:44 UTC+1, SRT wrote:
Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years old
(birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it to
rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


Mine is a Haws too and it's a favourite as has a long spout. The frost also got mine and it is leaking all round the base. I wonder if there is any 'rubber' type paint one could do on the inside and outside?
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

On Tuesday, 10 April 2018 23:12:32 UTC+1, wrote:
On Thursday, 21 April 2011 13:33:44 UTC+1, SRT wrote:


Hi,
As in header. I have a Haws traditional can that's just about 2 years old
(birthday present)
Unfortunately I noticed the centre of the base had pushed out causing it to
rock around ( maybe frost?)
so I tapped it back into line and now see a slight weep/leak from the
welding around the base
Any ideas as to best way if any to repair?
Thanks.
Stuart.


Mine is a Haws too and it's a favourite as has a long spout. The frost also got mine and it is leaking all round the base. I wonder if there is any 'rubber' type paint one could do on the inside and outside?


There's silicone. Or epoxy.


NT
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

On Wed, 11 Apr 2018 03:25:08 +0100, Rob Morley wrote:

You can get special low temperature solder that works on galvanised
steel.


Aside from the fact that the original can leaked in 2011: regular tin/lead or
tin solder will work on galvanised steel, also on sheet zinc. Just don't
overheat, i.e. an electric iron is better than a blowlamp (which may burn off
the zinc, or melt a hole in sheet zinc). Zinc chloride is a good flux, used to
known as "killed spirits of salt".


Thomas Prufer
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Default Galvanised watering can repair

On Wednesday, 11 April 2018 11:39:45 UTC+1, Thomas Prufer wrote:
On Wed, 11 Apr 2018 03:25:08 +0100, Rob Morley wrote:

You can get special low temperature solder that works on galvanised
steel.


Aside from the fact that the original can leaked in 2011: regular tin/lead or
tin solder will work on galvanised steel, also on sheet zinc. Just don't
overheat, i.e. an electric iron is better than a blowlamp (which may burn off
the zinc, or melt a hole in sheet zinc). Zinc chloride is a good flux, used to
known as "killed spirits of salt".


Thomas Prufer


The question was asked 21 hours ago. Tin/lead solder will work in the sense that it goes on, if the workpiece is got spotless, which may be a challenge. But it has near zero strength.


NT
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wrote in message
...

On Wednesday, 11 April 2018 11:39:45 UTC+1, Thomas Prufer wrote:
On Wed, 11 Apr 2018 03:25:08 +0100, Rob Morley
wrote:

You can get special low temperature solder that works on galvanised
steel.


Aside from the fact that the original can leaked in 2011: regular
tin/lead or
tin solder will work on galvanised steel, also on sheet zinc. Just don't
overheat, i.e. an electric iron is better than a blowlamp (which may burn
off
the zinc, or melt a hole in sheet zinc). Zinc chloride is a good flux,
used to
known as "killed spirits of salt".


Thomas Prufer


The question was asked 21 hours ago. Tin/lead solder will work in the sense
that it goes on, if the workpiece is got spotless, which may be a
challenge. But it has near zero strength.


NT


CLEAN galvanised steel solders very nicely using the new 'lead free'
solder - in fact it's about the only thing I've found that it is useful for
! I bend up small boxes and fitting from 1.2 mm 'Zintec' sheet and fillet
all the corners with this stuff. Take a time getting used to the longer
liquidus but the results are very good given practice.

Andrew


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On Wednesday, 11 April 2018 21:52:28 UTC+1, Andrew Mawson wrote:
NT wrote in message
...
On Wednesday, 11 April 2018 11:39:45 UTC+1, Thomas Prufer wrote:
On Wed, 11 Apr 2018 03:25:08 +0100, Rob Morley
wrote:


You can get special low temperature solder that works on galvanised
steel.

Aside from the fact that the original can leaked in 2011: regular
tin/lead or
tin solder will work on galvanised steel, also on sheet zinc. Just don't
overheat, i.e. an electric iron is better than a blowlamp (which may burn
off
the zinc, or melt a hole in sheet zinc). Zinc chloride is a good flux,
used to
known as "killed spirits of salt".


Thomas Prufer


The question was asked 21 hours ago. Tin/lead solder will work in the sense
that it goes on, if the workpiece is got spotless, which may be a
challenge. But it has near zero strength.


NT


CLEAN galvanised steel solders very nicely using the new 'lead free'
solder - in fact it's about the only thing I've found that it is useful for
! I bend up small boxes and fitting from 1.2 mm 'Zintec' sheet and fillet
all the corners with this stuff. Take a time getting used to the longer
liquidus but the results are very good given practice.

Andrew


epoxy would be stronger


NT
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