Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old January 13th 19, 02:25 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jan 2019
Posts: 1
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image

  #2   Report Post  
Old January 14th 19, 02:57 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2010
Posts: 2,551
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image


It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.

--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
  #3   Report Post  
Old January 14th 19, 05:00 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 1,675
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image


It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.

Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.
  #4   Report Post  
Old January 14th 19, 07:17 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: May 2016
Posts: 536
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

On Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 11:01:39 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:
On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image


It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.

Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.


Rube would have fun with that thing. g There is no way that combination of slides and clamps could stand up to a cut made with any kind of metalworking machine. It has looseness, flexing and backlash written all over it.

The top part looks like a larger version of the milling attachment on my South Bend 10L lathe, which is original equipment. In terms of relative sizes, though, the X-Y base is much larger that on the assembly in the photo.

--
Ed Huntress
  #5   Report Post  
Old January 14th 19, 01:45 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 5,303
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

wrote in message
...
On Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 11:01:39 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:
On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"

wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set
up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image

It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y
table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.

Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.


Rube would have fun with that thing. g There is no way that
combination of slides and clamps could stand up to a cut made with
any kind of metalworking machine. It has looseness, flexing and
backlash written all over it.

The top part looks like a larger version of the milling attachment
on my South Bend 10L lathe, which is original equipment. In terms of
relative sizes, though, the X-Y base is much larger that on the
assembly in the photo.

--
Ed Huntress


It does look very South Bend-ish but the only details that match my
Heavy 10 milling attachment are visible end of the upright slide base
and the vise opening with square head clamping screws. The vise on
mine is part of the slide casting and the tilting joint is on the back
of the slide base.

The vertical leadscrew on mine ends in a round shaft above the same
bushing. The unbalanced removeable handle crank engages a protruding
dowel pin at about the height of the socket head screw on the right.
-jsw




  #6   Report Post  
Old January 14th 19, 04:40 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: May 2016
Posts: 536
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 7:45:09 AM UTC-5, Jim Wilkins wrote:
wrote in message
...
On Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 11:01:39 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:
On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"

wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set
up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image

It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y
table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.
Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.


Rube would have fun with that thing. g There is no way that
combination of slides and clamps could stand up to a cut made with
any kind of metalworking machine. It has looseness, flexing and
backlash written all over it.

The top part looks like a larger version of the milling attachment
on my South Bend 10L lathe, which is original equipment. In terms of
relative sizes, though, the X-Y base is much larger that on the
assembly in the photo.

--
Ed Huntress


It does look very South Bend-ish but the only details that match my
Heavy 10 milling attachment are visible end of the upright slide base
and the vise opening with square head clamping screws. The vise on
mine is part of the slide casting and the tilting joint is on the back
of the slide base.

The vertical leadscrew on mine ends in a round shaft above the same
bushing. The unbalanced removeable handle crank engages a protruding
dowel pin at about the height of the socket head screw on the right.
-jsw


Yeah, that's the way mine works, too. It was part of the kit that came with the lathe: War Board, built for the Navy in 1945, and all surfaces on the milling attachment are machined.

But, if my failing memory serves, the milling attachments for larger SB lathes were more like the one in the photo.

--
Ed Huntress
  #7   Report Post  
Old January 14th 19, 10:21 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2006
Posts: 448
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

wrote in message
...
On Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 11:01:39 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:
On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image

It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.

Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.


Rube would have fun with that thing. g There is no way that combination
of slides and clamps could stand up to a cut made with any kind of
metalworking machine. It has looseness, flexing and backlash written all
over it.

The top part looks like a larger version of the milling attachment on my
South Bend 10L lathe, which is original equipment. In terms of relative
sizes, though, the X-Y base is much larger that on the assembly in the
photo.

--
Ed Huntress


Those are Atlases.
They use the same castings and dovetail sizes on several different
assemblies.
Someone frankensteined a 10" lathe milling attachment to the top of an X-Y
table that they removed the table from. They might have had to add a cross
slide from the 10" into the mix. I don't remember if the X-Y table had a
swivel.

Paul K. Dickman


  #8   Report Post  
Old January 14th 19, 10:23 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 5,303
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

wrote in message
...
On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 7:45:09 AM UTC-5, Jim Wilkins wrote:
wrote in message
...
On Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 11:01:39 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:
On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"

wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis
set
up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image

It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for
a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis
X-Y
table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.
Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.

Rube would have fun with that thing. g There is no way that
combination of slides and clamps could stand up to a cut made
with
any kind of metalworking machine. It has looseness, flexing and
backlash written all over it.

The top part looks like a larger version of the milling
attachment
on my South Bend 10L lathe, which is original equipment. In terms
of
relative sizes, though, the X-Y base is much larger that on the
assembly in the photo.

--
Ed Huntress


It does look very South Bend-ish but the only details that match my
Heavy 10 milling attachment are visible end of the upright slide
base
and the vise opening with square head clamping screws. The vise on
mine is part of the slide casting and the tilting joint is on the
back
of the slide base.

The vertical leadscrew on mine ends in a round shaft above the same
bushing. The unbalanced removeable handle crank engages a
protruding
dowel pin at about the height of the socket head screw on the
right.
-jsw


Yeah, that's the way mine works, too. It was part of the kit that
came with the lathe: War Board, built for the Navy in 1945, and all
surfaces on the milling attachment are machined.

But, if my failing memory serves, the milling attachments for larger
SB lathes were more like the one in the photo.

--
Ed Huntress


http://shdesigns.org/Craftsman-12x36/mill1.jpg


  #9   Report Post  
Old January 15th 19, 01:51 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: May 2016
Posts: 536
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 4:21:57 PM UTC-5, Paul K. Dickman wrote:
wrote in message
...
On Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 11:01:39 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:
On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image

It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.
Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.


Rube would have fun with that thing. g There is no way that combination
of slides and clamps could stand up to a cut made with any kind of
metalworking machine. It has looseness, flexing and backlash written all
over it.

The top part looks like a larger version of the milling attachment on my
South Bend 10L lathe, which is original equipment. In terms of relative
sizes, though, the X-Y base is much larger that on the assembly in the
photo.

--
Ed Huntress


Those are Atlases.
They use the same castings and dovetail sizes on several different
assemblies.
Someone frankensteined a 10" lathe milling attachment to the top of an X-Y
table that they removed the table from. They might have had to add a cross
slide from the 10" into the mix. I don't remember if the X-Y table had a
swivel.

Paul K. Dickman


Aha. That must have been a common configuration. I see from Jim's link that it's like one on the Sears lathes that were built by Atlas.

--
Ed Huntress
  #10   Report Post  
Old January 15th 19, 04:51 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Nov 2017
Posts: 1,675
Default What is this 4 axis set up called?

On Mon, 14 Jan 2019 15:21:16 -0600, "Paul K. Dickman"
wrote:

wrote in message
...
On Sunday, January 13, 2019 at 11:01:39 PM UTC-5, Clare wrote:
On 14 Jan 2019 01:57:30 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
wrote:

On 2019-01-13, JimmyMcGill wrote:
Hey does anyone know what the correct name for this 4 axis set up is
called and possibly who makes it?

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/reviews/what-is-the-name-of-this-5-axis-positioning-tool/?action=dlattach;attach=617821;image

It looks to me like a combination of a milling attachment for a
lathe (the vertical part replaces the compound), and a 2-axis X-Y table
missing the table top.

Is it sure that the same company made both parts? The bottom
(X-Y) part looks like something which Sears sold way back when.

Note that the handwheel on the vertical leadscrew is different
from those on the X and Y axes.

Enjoy,
DoN.
Looks like some kind of Rube Goldberg setup of some sort - - -
I'm thinking at leeast 2 more or less unrelated tools fastened
together.


Rube would have fun with that thing. g There is no way that combination
of slides and clamps could stand up to a cut made with any kind of
metalworking machine. It has looseness, flexing and backlash written all
over it.

The top part looks like a larger version of the milling attachment on my
South Bend 10L lathe, which is original equipment. In terms of relative
sizes, though, the X-Y base is much larger that on the assembly in the
photo.

--
Ed Huntress


Those are Atlases.
They use the same castings and dovetail sizes on several different
assemblies.
Someone frankensteined a 10" lathe milling attachment to the top of an X-Y
table that they removed the table from. They might have had to add a cross
slide from the 10" into the mix. I don't remember if the X-Y table had a
swivel.

Paul K. Dickman

Like I said - a "Rube Goldberg" setup - - -


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SOMEBODY CALLED MICHAEL TERRELL AND SAID "I LOVE YOU RUUD" ON HISANSWERING MACHINE SO HE SET HIS ANSWERING MACHINE ON FIRE WITH ACETONE. Curtis Pryce[_2_] Electronics Repair 0 March 10th 08 07:22 PM
Is there a way to set the x-axis on my Dewalt? mywebaccts (at) PLUGcomcast.net Woodworking 9 March 16th 06 12:19 AM
Spindle axis vs. "Z" axis... Robin S. Metalworking 4 February 22nd 05 02:06 PM
Sheldon 0 milling machine X axis nut needed Dave Pidwerbecki Metalworking 1 April 3rd 04 05:08 AM
3 Axis CNC Mini-Mill for sale on eBay $1 No Reserve Steven Haerr - CNCTrader Corp Metalworking 0 March 11th 04 02:06 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:13 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"

 

Copyright © 2017