Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old June 4th 09, 01:27 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Thin kerf hole saw?

On Jun 3, 7:59*pm, Allan wrote:
I want to cut round clean-out doors in my birdhouses and wish
there was a hole saw with a very thin kerf, like a metal bandsaw
blade (.035" thick).

All the hole saws I can buy have about .100" kerfs, which is too
much to "fudge". Cut with a band saw works well, but, it's not a
central hole.

Even have the idea to try to make one from a 1 1/16" wide metal
band saw I have... I'd gently feed it in a drill press.

Al


How about cutting a tapered plug with a saber saw at an angle?
Drill a short line of small holes to get the blade through to start.
With the taper big inside just push up the bottom to clean out
the old stuff. This should work unless the bottom is too thin.

Charlie

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Old June 4th 09, 01:48 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Thin kerf hole saw?

On Wed, 3 Jun 2009 22:04:42 -0700 (PDT), Larry The Snake Guy
wrote:

Use your regular hole saw. Find some veneer a bit thinner than the
blade and laminate a strip around the edge of the "door".


Thought of that too. I'll try it a bit... but it's "inelegant" I
think. Perhaps it could be a feature, not a bug as I say.
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Old June 4th 09, 01:49 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Thin kerf hole saw?

On Wed, 3 Jun 2009 22:04:42 -0700 (PDT), Larry The Snake Guy
wrote:

Use your regular hole saw. Find some veneer a bit thinner than the
blade and laminate a strip around the edge of the "door".


The 1/10" kerf is probably too thick to bend dry in one layer
though come to think of it.
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Old June 4th 09, 06:30 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Thin kerf hole saw?


Larry Jaques wrote:

I helped a neighbor build a dozen of his and we used a hinged bottom
plate with a removable screw in the front. The whole bottom dumps for
ease in removing all the old nesting material.



That sounds like what 'Hawkie' needs. Remove the screw and he falls
to the ground, then drives his bent beak into the dirt.


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Old April 21st 21, 06:18 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Thin kerf hole saw?

replying to Allan, Arek Papelian wrote:
I'm searching for the same.
None exist - but I have found a great alternative:
This solution has tested extremely well, against Bass wood, and Red Oak.
Get a brass pen tube - make the edge jagged - I used a scroll saw and made
very minimal random edges.
I used just enough force to hold the tube my drill press and it worked better
than any solution I can imagine. Also very cheap.

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for full context, visit https://www.polytechforum.com/metalw...aw-183881-.htm




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