Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old November 8th 19, 06:25 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

I've been looking for a cheap, possibly DIY solder smoke solution. I
did see the device here that someone shared, but it appears to use water
and it looks like he's adding the carbon later. I had hoped for
something simpler, then I came across this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH5APw_SLUU


My local home improvement store has this filter:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TUDHPS8...ing=UTF8&psc=1


That particular filter, although somewhat expensive (MERV=12), is
supposed to remove smoke along with a host of other pollutants. It
looks like there are one or two filters also available at even higher
MERV ratings, but more expensive and I wanted the cheapest alternative
that would still take care of the smoke. Using a filter like this in
front of the box fan and placing near my soldering area would no doubt
suck in the smoke, but what about the effectiveness? Anyone ever try it
or use this method? Also, as I wouldn't be running the combination all
the time, it should last a lot longer than 3 months.

Thanks.

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Old November 8th 19, 06:58 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

That would certainly clear the smoke out of a room, but I think it misses the point of a smaller device that could be directed to a specific location. A fan of that size takes up considerable real-estate, makes a good deal of noise, and cannot be easily directed.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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Old November 8th 19, 07:17 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 12:25:02 -0500, Alex Borroughs
wrote:

I've been looking for a cheap, possibly DIY solder smoke solution. I
did see the device here that someone shared, but it appears to use water
and it looks like he's adding the carbon later. I had hoped for
something simpler, then I came across this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH5APw_SLUU


My local home improvement store has this filter:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TUDHPS8...ing=UTF8&psc=1


That particular filter, although somewhat expensive (MERV=12), is
supposed to remove smoke along with a host of other pollutants. It
looks like there are one or two filters also available at even higher
MERV ratings, but more expensive and I wanted the cheapest alternative
that would still take care of the smoke. Using a filter like this in
front of the box fan and placing near my soldering area would no doubt
suck in the smoke, but what about the effectiveness? Anyone ever try it
or use this method? Also, as I wouldn't be running the combination all
the time, it should last a lot longer than 3 months.

Thanks.


How would you know if it works?

--

John Larkin Highland Technology, Inc
picosecond timing precision measurement

jlarkin att highlandtechnology dott com
http://www.highlandtechnology.com

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Old November 8th 19, 07:23 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

On 11/8/19 1:17 PM, John Larkin wrote:
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 12:25:02 -0500, Alex Borroughs
wrote:

I've been looking for a cheap, possibly DIY solder smoke solution. I
did see the device here that someone shared, but it appears to use water
and it looks like he's adding the carbon later. I had hoped for
something simpler, then I came across this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH5APw_SLUU


My local home improvement store has this filter:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TUDHPS8...ing=UTF8&psc=1


That particular filter, although somewhat expensive (MERV=12), is
supposed to remove smoke along with a host of other pollutants. It
looks like there are one or two filters also available at even higher
MERV ratings, but more expensive and I wanted the cheapest alternative
that would still take care of the smoke. Using a filter like this in
front of the box fan and placing near my soldering area would no doubt
suck in the smoke, but what about the effectiveness? Anyone ever try it
or use this method? Also, as I wouldn't be running the combination all
the time, it should last a lot longer than 3 months.

Thanks.


How would you know if it works?


The best way I know how might be to try burning something smoky like
incense for a few minutes and see if the smell clears the room. I know
that's probably not the best way. I was relying more on filter specs
than anything else. That seemed to be the lowest strength that filtered
smoke also.



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Old November 8th 19, 07:49 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

John Larkin wrote:

On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 12:25:02 -0500, Alex Borroughs
wrote:

I've been looking for a cheap, possibly DIY solder smoke solution. I
did see the device here that someone shared, but it appears to use water
and it looks like he's adding the carbon later. I had hoped for
something simpler, then I came across this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH5APw_SLUU


My local home improvement store has this filter:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TUDHPS8...?_encoding=UTF
8&psc=1


That particular filter, although somewhat expensive (MERV=12), is
supposed to remove smoke along with a host of other pollutants. It
looks like there are one or two filters also available at even higher
MERV ratings, but more expensive and I wanted the cheapest alternative
that would still take care of the smoke. Using a filter like this in
front of the box fan and placing near my soldering area would no doubt
suck in the smoke, but what about the effectiveness? Anyone ever try it
or use this method? Also, as I wouldn't be running the combination all
the time, it should last a lot longer than 3 months.

Thanks.


How would you know if it works?


I use a pair of Dylos Pro Particle counters:

http://www.dylosproducts.com/?gclid=...Y_ICh3nzwtYEAA
YASAAEgIPRfD_BwE

One at the input of the filter, one at the output.

Ordinarily, particle counters are useless for home use since they cannot
distinguish between organic particles such as dust mite excretement, cat
dander, etc., and harmless mist from taking a shower or cooking.

However, a pair of particle counters are excellent at determing the
effectiveness of a filter.

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Old November 8th 19, 08:23 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 1:18:57 PM UTC-5, Alex Borroughs wrote:

Quite right. I liked the smaller unit posted here recently, but he's
using watered down filters. I had hoped to avoid that mess, plus he
says they take a long time to dry. If dry layers could have been used
instead, that would have been a winner for me, but I don't know enough
about it.


The water-filters increase the efficiency of the filters used. There are any number of dry carbon-filters that would also do the trick, and there are any number of methods to treat the water so that mold/mildew would not form in the filters. My concerns with a simple particle filter are as follows:

a) Particle filters (MERV-13) are useless against gasses, odors and pretty much useless against micro-contaminants (smaller than one (1) Micron.
b)The components of solder-rosin smoke that are (sometimes) harmful would pass right through it.
c) Footprint - no matter how large a bench one has, there is always just a little bit too-little room on it.

https://www.digikey.com/en/product-h...xoCyHkQAvD_BwE

Depending on how much your time is worth, this would solve the problem once and for all at a not-ridiculous cost.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
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Old November 8th 19, 08:35 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

On 11/8/19 1:49 PM, Steve Wilson wrote:
John Larkin wrote:

On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 12:25:02 -0500, Alex Borroughs
wrote:

I've been looking for a cheap, possibly DIY solder smoke solution. I
did see the device here that someone shared, but it appears to use water
and it looks like he's adding the carbon later. I had hoped for
something simpler, then I came across this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH5APw_SLUU


My local home improvement store has this filter:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TUDHPS8...?_encoding=UTF
8&psc=1


That particular filter, although somewhat expensive (MERV=12), is
supposed to remove smoke along with a host of other pollutants. It
looks like there are one or two filters also available at even higher
MERV ratings, but more expensive and I wanted the cheapest alternative
that would still take care of the smoke. Using a filter like this in
front of the box fan and placing near my soldering area would no doubt
suck in the smoke, but what about the effectiveness? Anyone ever try it
or use this method? Also, as I wouldn't be running the combination all
the time, it should last a lot longer than 3 months.

Thanks.


How would you know if it works?


I use a pair of Dylos Pro Particle counters:

http://www.dylosproducts.com/?gclid=...Y_ICh3nzwtYEAA
YASAAEgIPRfD_BwE

One at the input of the filter, one at the output.

Ordinarily, particle counters are useless for home use since they cannot
distinguish between organic particles such as dust mite excretement, cat
dander, etc., and harmless mist from taking a shower or cooking.

However, a pair of particle counters are excellent at determing the
effectiveness of a filter.


Great idea until I saw the price, ouch, but probably the no doubt best
way.
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Old November 8th 19, 08:39 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

On 11/8/19 2:23 PM, wrote:
.... and there are any number of methods to treat the water so that mold/mildew would not form in the filters.


Well, if I didn't have to remove, wash and dry the filters each time in
the device Horton used, how would I go about treating the water to
prevent mold build up?



https://www.digikey.com/en/product-h...xoCyHkQAvD_BwE

Depending on how much your time is worth, this would solve the problem once and for all at a not-ridiculous cost.


I will check this out, thank you.


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


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Old November 8th 19, 09:28 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default could this simple solution work for solder smoke device?

Understand two things first. The filters are to be kept DAMP, not saturated.. So, there is not a lot of water in there in the first place. I expect that they would dry out (in a normal interior climate) before the 'grew' in any case - much as the sponge on your tip-cleaner if you use that method. Second, any filter you use will either need to be cleaned or replaced with some frequency depending on use.

With that in mind, synthetic filters are not attacked by most common solvents and disinfectants. So, one tablespoon of household bleach per pint of water, a 10% solution of isopropyl alcohol and water, two jiggers of vodka per pint of water, a teaspoon of borax per pint of water and so on all would take care of any growth issues.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


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