Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default solder pot solder

I need a small amount (about a cubic inch, I would guess) of this for a
solder pot. Does anyone know where I would get this (in the uk, I suppose)

It doesn't matter to me whether it's lead based or not as it's only being
used for tinning wires.

Apparently normal fluxed solder isn't suitable.


--
Vista: the hd dvd player that thinks it's an operating system ŠJC 2009
All men are islands


  #2   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default solder pot solder

In message , jasee
writes
I need a small amount (about a cubic inch, I would guess) of this for a
solder pot. Does anyone know where I would get this (in the uk, I suppose)

It doesn't matter to me whether it's lead based or not as it's only being
used for tinning wires.

Apparently normal fluxed solder isn't suitable.


Any plumbers merchant. Plumbers use a separate acidic(?) flux -
something to do with the need to ensure drinking water pipes are not
contaminated.
--
Invalid
  #3   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default solder pot solder


"Anthony R. Gold" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 1 Aug 2009 16:13:16 +0100, "jasee" wrote:

I need a small amount (about a cubic inch, I would guess) of this for a
solder pot. Does anyone know where I would get this (in the uk, I
suppose)

It doesn't matter to me whether it's lead based or not as it's only being
used for tinning wires.

Apparently normal fluxed solder isn't suitable.


http://uk.farnell.com/multicomp/gmc0...50g/dp/1259065


Thanks but looks to be about four times as much as I need


  #4   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default solder pot solder


"Invalid" wrote in message
...
In message , jasee
writes
I need a small amount (about a cubic inch, I would guess) of this for a
solder pot. Does anyone know where I would get this (in the uk, I suppose)

It doesn't matter to me whether it's lead based or not as it's only being
used for tinning wires.

Apparently normal fluxed solder isn't suitable.


Any plumbers merchant. Plumbers use a separate acidic(?) flux - something
to do with the need to ensure drinking water pipes are not contaminated.


If this really suitable it would be good, basically I'm tinning lintz wire.


  #5   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,772
Default solder pot solder


"jasee" wrote in message
...

"Anthony R. Gold" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 1 Aug 2009 16:13:16 +0100, "jasee" wrote:

I need a small amount (about a cubic inch, I would guess) of this for a
solder pot. Does anyone know where I would get this (in the uk, I
suppose)

It doesn't matter to me whether it's lead based or not as it's only
being
used for tinning wires.

Apparently normal fluxed solder isn't suitable.


http://uk.farnell.com/multicomp/gmc0...50g/dp/1259065


Thanks but looks to be about four times as much as I need


Litz wire can be very difficult to solder to. I certainly wouldn't recommend
trying to use lead-free solder, unless you have to - and contrary to what
you say, it *does* matter if the tinned wires are to be used in any
equipment that is going to be offered for sale in the EU. In this case, it
is a legal requirement that you observe the RoHS directive, which mandates
that you may not use leaded solder, or components containing lead, or having
lead-solder tinned leadouts for any part of the product. If the wires are
only going to be used for something you're doing for yourself or a small
group of you - a ham radio project or some such, at your local radio club
for instance - then you need not conform to the requirements of RoHS.

If the Litz wire is modern stuff, then the insulating material should burn
off in the solder pot, but you may need to hold the wire in the molten
solder for a few seconds to ensure that you are down to bare metal. You
*can* use normal flux-cored solder, if you have a temperature controlled
iron that you can turn up the temperature nice and high on, with a nice big
chisel tip. You can pinch the iron up in a vice at an angle so that the flat
part of the tip faces up and is horizontal. You can then apply the wire in
one hand, and the solder in the other, and form a pool of molten fluxed
solder on the tip, which you can hold the wire in, before slowly drawing it
out. No slower really, than using a solder pot.

Arfa




  #6   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default solder pot solder


"Anthony R. Gold" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 1 Aug 2009 17:27:55 +0100, "jasee" wrote:


"Invalid" wrote in message
...
In message , jasee
writes
I need a small amount (about a cubic inch, I would guess) of this for a
solder pot. Does anyone know where I would get this (in the uk, I
suppose)

It doesn't matter to me whether it's lead based or not as it's only
being
used for tinning wires.

Apparently normal fluxed solder isn't suitable.


Any plumbers merchant. Plumbers use a separate acidic(?) flux -
something
to do with the need to ensure drinking water pipes are not contaminated.


If this really suitable it would be good, basically I'm tinning lintz
wire.


Maybe litz (litzendraht in German means bundled) wire. This manufacturer
recommends 60/40 tin/lead:

http://www.litz-wire.com/pdf%20files...ire_231507.pdf


It _is_ bundled strands of insulated wire, difficult to solder together.
60/40 tin lead is traditional solder which solders much better than the
awful lead free stuff. Interesting link (thanks) though my solder pot's max
temperature is much lower.


  #7   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,001
Default solder pot solder

Solder used for solder pots typically wouldn't have flux in it, but
otherwise, it's the same alloy as common wire solders.

If you can find a spool/roll of solid wire solder, you can melt that in a
solder pot with the same results.
You can feed solid wire solder (not acid or rosin core) into your solder
pot, and apply a suitable amount of liquid rosin flux to the ends of the
wires before dipping them.

Rosin core solder would also work, but you would need to skim the flux off
the top of the molten solder (flat hardwood stick similar to a tongue
depressor) to minimize smoking of the hot rosin.
You would still want to flux the wire ends properly.

You should probably do the initial melt outdoors if you use rosin core
solder because the smoke may be a problem.

I'm guessing that a half-pound (8 oz) spool of solder would approximate the
1 cu in supply you referenced, although that's a very low volume for a
standard solder pot.

--
Cheers,
WB
..............


"jasee" wrote in message
...
I need a small amount (about a cubic inch, I would guess) of this for a
solder pot. Does anyone know where I would get this (in the uk, I suppose)

It doesn't matter to me whether it's lead based or not as it's only being
used for tinning wires.

Apparently normal fluxed solder isn't suitable.


--
Vista: the hd dvd player that thinks it's an operating system ŠJC 2009
All men are islands


  #8   Report Post  
Posted to demon.tech.pc,sci.electronics.repair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default solder pot solder


"Wild_Bill" wrote in message
...
Solder used for solder pots typically wouldn't have flux in it, but
otherwise, it's the same alloy as common wire solders.

If you can find a spool/roll of solid wire solder, you can melt that in a
solder pot with the same results.
You can feed solid wire solder (not acid or rosin core) into your solder
pot, and apply a suitable amount of liquid rosin flux to the ends of the
wires before dipping them.

Rosin core solder would also work, but you would need to skim the flux off
the top of the molten solder (flat hardwood stick similar to a tongue
depressor) to minimize smoking of the hot rosin.
You would still want to flux the wire ends properly.

You should probably do the initial melt outdoors if you use rosin core
solder because the smoke may be a problem.

I'm guessing that a half-pound (8 oz) spool of solder would approximate
the 1 cu in supply you referenced, although that's a very low volume for a
standard solder pot.


Sorry for the late reply, thanks all for the advice, I've got plumbers old
lead/tin and new type solders, from what's been said, I think I'll try
lead/tin first. Someone off list mentioned using meths to burn the
insulation of the wire but I think it's too thin for that.
Thanks everyone.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Solder Brian Gregory [UK] Electronics 14 September 2nd 08 02:13 AM
why 60-40 solder? [email protected] Electronics Repair 73 February 21st 08 08:06 PM
Old Solder Phillip944 Home Repair 23 December 13th 05 03:21 PM
SMD Solder Sunny Electronics Repair 0 January 10th 04 04:49 AM
Solder Bryan Electronics 2 August 23rd 03 07:37 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:09 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Š2004-2024 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"