Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old March 13th 19, 12:43 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Default Annual Spring Cautionary Post

Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I am sure similar perils lurk everywhere. So:

http://www.nwf.org/~/media/PDFs/Glob...hange-WEB.ashx

https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef631

https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/surveillance/

http://bugguide.net/node/view/475348

https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/diseases/direct.html

https://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/

https://ee_ce_img.s3.amazonaws.com/c...2_400_301..jpg

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/61646.php
images.radiopaedia.org/images/1827647/6b765cac7f64a5107b54df2e031e12.jpg

It is time for the annual post on stalking the wild radio, audio component (or other collectible) - and what accidental passengers that may come along with it:

1. Insects and other arthropods:

Anything from spiders to wasps to fleas and more. Any radio that has spent substantial time in a barn, basement, shed, garage or any other damp or exposed area may well be inhabited by or infested with various small and potentially painful critters. Especially those found in the southern states, home to the Brown Recluse and Black Widow spiders. Wasps, centipedes (quite
poisonous as it happens) and other vermin are no fun as well. And, if you do find some critter of this nature, KILL IT. Being soft-hearted and releasing it into _your_ environment may make you feel all warm
and fuzzy, but that creature may then cause considerable harm being somewhere it does not belong and where it perhaps has no natural predators. EDIT: Global Warming (whether you believe in it or not) has pushed the Recluse range into southern Maryland – mostly by human transport and not as successful breeding colonies but more and more common, with some few transported by human agency as far as Michigan and Pennsylvania. This is one NASTY spider with a very nasty bite.

2. Evidence of Rodent Inhabitation: Handle with GREAT care.

Hanta-Virus (a relative of Ebola) is endemic throughout the entire United States, Mexico and parts of Canada. It is a disease without effective treatment and an over 50% mortality rate worldwide (36% in the US). It is carried in the feces and fresh urine of many rodents...and there is limited recent evidence that reconstituted waste (dried but inhaled) will also spread the disease especially if inhaled, a possibility not accepted in the recent past.

Lyme Disease: Carried by deer ticks that winter over in the white-footed deer mouse (an omnivore, BTW) that will winter over anywhere it can find shelter. The ticks that mice carry will leave the mouse to lay eggs... perhaps in that radio that served as their temporary winter dorm and latrine. Various other tick-borne diseases include Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and a whole bunch more *very* nasty diseases not worth risking, are all endemic in the US.

Note that per the CDC, there are now four types of ticks carrying multiple diseases dangerous to humans and pets. All this flying back and forth with pet animals has made the problem massively worse.

3. Bird Dung & Old Nests: Per a recent paper, there have been over sixty (60) diseases that may be carried in wild bird poop including Avian Flu, Fowl Typhoid, Infectious Coryza, Paratyphoid, Salmonellosis, Schistosomiasis, strep and on-and-on. ((Those of you servicing your Bluebird and other bird houses about now need also keep this in mind.)) Most wild birds are carriers of these diseases and show no visible symptoms. We bleach our birdhouses - THEN we clean them out. Amazing the number of dead insects and other vermin we get out of them every spring.

Asbestos: Dangerous only when friable - small particles able to become airborne easily. If you are a smoker, even more dangerous. A single (one (1)) fiber can cause a fatal reaction over time – although that actuality is extremely rare and will (usually) take many years. For all that, it is fairly easily made safe with a little bit of care and caution. But even if you do not believe it is dangerous, you do not have the right to expose others, or transport it in conveyances where residual material may come in contact with others - that is, do not transport it openly in the family minivan.

Bottom line: A proverbial ounce of caution beats the hell out of a pound of care. Common sense, rubber gloves, a breathing mask, Lysol, Bleach, Moth-balls, Insecticides (which often do not work on Spiders or Ticks, so read the label), and other elementary precautions conscientiously and carefully applied will "safen" even the nastiest of wild radios.


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

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Old March 13th 19, 01:08 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 10,255
Default Annual Spring Cautionary Post

On Wednesday, 13 March 2019 12:43:25 UTC, wrote:

Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I am sure similar perils lurk everywhere. So:

http://www.nwf.org/~/media/PDFs/Glob...hange-WEB.ashx

https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef631

https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/surveillance/

http://bugguide.net/node/view/475348

https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/diseases/direct.html

https://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/

https://ee_ce_img.s3.amazonaws.com/c...02_400_301.jpg

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/61646.php
images.radiopaedia.org/images/1827647/6b765cac7f64a5107b54df2e031e12.jpg

It is time for the annual post on stalking the wild radio, audio component (or other collectible) - and what accidental passengers that may come along with it:

1. Insects and other arthropods:

Anything from spiders to wasps to fleas and more. Any radio that has spent substantial time in a barn, basement, shed, garage or any other damp or exposed area may well be inhabited by or infested with various small and potentially painful critters. Especially those found in the southern states, home to the Brown Recluse and Black Widow spiders. Wasps, centipedes (quite
poisonous as it happens) and other vermin are no fun as well. And, if you do find some critter of this nature, KILL IT. Being soft-hearted and releasing it into _your_ environment may make you feel all warm
and fuzzy, but that creature may then cause considerable harm being somewhere it does not belong and where it perhaps has no natural predators. EDIT: Global Warming (whether you believe in it or not) has pushed the Recluse range into southern Maryland – mostly by human transport and not as successful breeding colonies but more and more common, with some few transported by human agency as far as Michigan and Pennsylvania. This is one NASTY spider with a very nasty bite.

2. Evidence of Rodent Inhabitation: Handle with GREAT care.

Hanta-Virus (a relative of Ebola) is endemic throughout the entire United States, Mexico and parts of Canada. It is a disease without effective treatment and an over 50% mortality rate worldwide (36% in the US). It is carried in the feces and fresh urine of many rodents...and there is limited recent evidence that reconstituted waste (dried but inhaled) will also spread the disease especially if inhaled, a possibility not accepted in the recent past.

Lyme Disease: Carried by deer ticks that winter over in the white-footed deer mouse (an omnivore, BTW) that will winter over anywhere it can find shelter. The ticks that mice carry will leave the mouse to lay eggs... perhaps in that radio that served as their temporary winter dorm and latrine. Various other tick-borne diseases include Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and a whole bunch more *very* nasty diseases not worth risking, are all endemic in the US.

Note that per the CDC, there are now four types of ticks carrying multiple diseases dangerous to humans and pets. All this flying back and forth with pet animals has made the problem massively worse.

3. Bird Dung & Old Nests: Per a recent paper, there have been over sixty (60) diseases that may be carried in wild bird poop including Avian Flu, Fowl Typhoid, Infectious Coryza, Paratyphoid, Salmonellosis, Schistosomiasis, strep and on-and-on. ((Those of you servicing your Bluebird and other bird houses about now need also keep this in mind.)) Most wild birds are carriers of these diseases and show no visible symptoms. We bleach our birdhouses - THEN we clean them out. Amazing the number of dead insects and other vermin we get out of them every spring.

Asbestos: Dangerous only when friable - small particles able to become airborne easily. If you are a smoker, even more dangerous. A single (one (1)) fiber can cause a fatal reaction over time – although that actuality is extremely rare and will (usually) take many years. For all that, it is fairly easily made safe with a little bit of care and caution. But even if you do not believe it is dangerous, you do not have the right to expose others, or transport it in conveyances where residual material may come in contact with others - that is, do not transport it openly in the family minivan.

Bottom line: A proverbial ounce of caution beats the hell out of a pound of care. Common sense, rubber gloves, a breathing mask, Lysol, Bleach, Moth-balls, Insecticides (which often do not work on Spiders or Ticks, so read the label), and other elementary precautions conscientiously and carefully applied will "safen" even the nastiest of wild radios.


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA



though not all fact. You forgot another popular nasty: nails. Standing on up-pointing nails is one of those activities that's not great fun either.


NT
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Old March 13th 19, 01:17 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 9:08:05 AM UTC-4, wrote:


though not all fact. You forgot another popular nasty: nails. Standing on up-pointing nails is one of those activities that's not great fun either.



Can't remember the last time I wore sandals and/or went barefoot rooting through a dumpster, barn, cellar, basement or other such location of unknown antecedents. And when in that mode, usually a very good flashlight, insect repellent, and often a hard-hat. The nail sticking through the floor above, or the nail sticking out of a joist is no fun at all.

Another demonstration that Common Sense isn't.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

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Old March 13th 19, 01:59 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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Posts: 5,170
Default Annual Spring Cautionary Post

On 13/03/2019 12:43, wrote:
Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I am sure similar perils lurk everywhere. So:

http://www.nwf.org/~/media/PDFs/Glob...hange-WEB.ashx

https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef631

https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/surveillance/

http://bugguide.net/node/view/475348

https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/diseases/direct.html

https://www.cdc.gov/ncezid/dvbd/

https://ee_ce_img.s3.amazonaws.com/c...2_400_301..jpg

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/61646.php
images.radiopaedia.org/images/1827647/6b765cac7f64a5107b54df2e031e12.jpg

It is time for the annual post on stalking the wild radio, audio component (or other collectible) - and what accidental passengers that may come along with it:

1. Insects and other arthropods:

Anything from spiders to wasps to fleas and more. Any radio that has spent substantial time in a barn, basement, shed, garage or any other damp or exposed area may well be inhabited by or infested with various small and potentially painful critters. Especially those found in the southern states, home to the Brown Recluse and Black Widow spiders. Wasps, centipedes (quite
poisonous as it happens) and other vermin are no fun as well. And, if you do find some critter of this nature, KILL IT. Being soft-hearted and releasing it into _your_ environment may make you feel all warm
and fuzzy, but that creature may then cause considerable harm being somewhere it does not belong and where it perhaps has no natural predators. EDIT: Global Warming (whether you believe in it or not) has pushed the Recluse range into southern Maryland – mostly by human transport and not as successful breeding colonies but more and more common, with some few transported by human agency as far as Michigan and Pennsylvania. This is one NASTY spider with a very nasty bite.

2. Evidence of Rodent Inhabitation: Handle with GREAT care.

Hanta-Virus (a relative of Ebola) is endemic throughout the entire United States, Mexico and parts of Canada. It is a disease without effective treatment and an over 50% mortality rate worldwide (36% in the US). It is carried in the feces and fresh urine of many rodents...and there is limited recent evidence that reconstituted waste (dried but inhaled) will also spread the disease especially if inhaled, a possibility not accepted in the recent past.

Lyme Disease: Carried by deer ticks that winter over in the white-footed deer mouse (an omnivore, BTW) that will winter over anywhere it can find shelter. The ticks that mice carry will leave the mouse to lay eggs... perhaps in that radio that served as their temporary winter dorm and latrine. Various other tick-borne diseases include Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and a whole bunch more *very* nasty diseases not worth risking, are all endemic in the US.

Note that per the CDC, there are now four types of ticks carrying multiple diseases dangerous to humans and pets. All this flying back and forth with pet animals has made the problem massively worse.

3. Bird Dung & Old Nests: Per a recent paper, there have been over sixty (60) diseases that may be carried in wild bird poop including Avian Flu, Fowl Typhoid, Infectious Coryza, Paratyphoid, Salmonellosis, Schistosomiasis, strep and on-and-on. ((Those of you servicing your Bluebird and other bird houses about now need also keep this in mind.)) Most wild birds are carriers of these diseases and show no visible symptoms. We bleach our birdhouses - THEN we clean them out. Amazing the number of dead insects and other vermin we get out of them every spring.

Asbestos: Dangerous only when friable - small particles able to become airborne easily. If you are a smoker, even more dangerous. A single (one (1)) fiber can cause a fatal reaction over time – although that actuality is extremely rare and will (usually) take many years. For all that, it is fairly easily made safe with a little bit of care and caution. But even if you do not believe it is dangerous, you do not have the right to expose others, or transport it in conveyances where residual material may come in contact with others - that is, do not transport it openly in the family minivan.

Bottom line: A proverbial ounce of caution beats the hell out of a pound of care. Common sense, rubber gloves, a breathing mask, Lysol, Bleach, Moth-balls, Insecticides (which often do not work on Spiders or Ticks, so read the label), and other elementary precautions conscientiously and carefully applied will "safen" even the nastiest of wild radios.


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA


And the perennial one, electrocution.
The first time for me, in the UK so 240V.
Aged perhaps 6 or 8 years old, I decided to unscrew the bakelite
hemisphere of the dangling light switch. I assume it was off, but
presumably learnt the hard way, that if something is off , then its not
necessarily safe.
Second time was as an electronics student, in same house as another
electronics student. We decided to have a party in the derelict house
next door, much better condition than our rented student house.
Surviving ring main there, so a matter of connecting a lead between the
2 houses. Prearranged a string between the upper windows.
Come the evening other electronics student tied the string to a lead
with a plug on either end. He grabbed the live plug as he'd already
plugged in the other end and got a shock. Then he tugged the string , so
I could pull through , and of course the first thing I did was grab the
live plug.
So beware the stupidity of others . We both survived that and other
electric shocks , to this day surprisingly.

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Old March 13th 19, 08:27 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Wednesday, March 13, 2019 at 9:59:35 AM UTC-4, N_Cook wrote:
So beware the stupidity of others . We both survived that and other
electric shocks , to this day surprisingly.


Don't forget hurricane season is upon us. I don't know how people survive connecting a generator with those suicide cords, but they look like a Darwin award waiting to happen.
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Old March 13th 19, 08:38 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair
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On Wed, 13 Mar 2019 05:43:22 -0700 (PDT),
" wrote:

Although not many here are scroungers or scavengers, perhaps there are enough to merit this post. I have pulled any number of gems out of dumpsters, barn sales and yard sales, in any case. This applies mostly to the continental United States, but I am sure similar perils lurk everywhere. So:


Fructose & corn syrup.
****s the liver, induces obesity, kills more
people than the bugs.
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