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Default OT: Old School Drywaller

Skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8fZLM5S_ds
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2021 13:42:03 -0700 (PDT), Michael
wrote:

Skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8fZLM5S_ds


The lath & plaster video after it is pretty good too. My sheetrock
looks like a mess. This is amazing. Lots of mud winds up on the
floor, though.
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On 3/27/2021 4:42 PM, Michael wrote:
Skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8fZLM5S_ds


The curved archway drywall was particularly impressive. I have one of
those drywall hatchets somewhere... I ought to learn how to use it.
That looks far more efficient than the modern method of hanging it.
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On Saturday, March 27, 2021 at 8:05:05 PM UTC-4, Michael Trew wrote:
On 3/27/2021 4:42 PM, Michael wrote:
Skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8fZLM5S_ds

The curved archway drywall was particularly impressive. I have one of
those drywall hatchets somewhere... I ought to learn how to use it.
That looks far more efficient than the modern method of hanging it.


Far more efficient than 4 x 8, 4 x 12 or 4 x 16 sheets? I think not.

There's an awful lot of mudding that they didn't show. Way too many seams.
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2021 18:12:12 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Saturday, March 27, 2021 at 8:05:05 PM UTC-4, Michael Trew wrote:
On 3/27/2021 4:42 PM, Michael wrote:
Skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8fZLM5S_ds

The curved archway drywall was particularly impressive. I have one of
those drywall hatchets somewhere... I ought to learn how to use it.
That looks far more efficient than the modern method of hanging it.


Far more efficient than 4 x 8, 4 x 12 or 4 x 16 sheets? I think not.

There's an awful lot of mudding that they didn't show. Way too many seams.


I don't think that's "sheetrock" rather lathe for the plaster. I
*think* the idea is to squeeze the plaster through the seams to hold
it. OTOH, the next video shows holes in the sheets.


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Default OT: Old School Drywaller

On Saturday, March 27, 2021 at 8:12:14 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:
On Saturday, March 27, 2021 at 8:05:05 PM UTC-4, Michael Trew wrote:
On 3/27/2021 4:42 PM, Michael wrote:
Skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8fZLM5S_ds

The curved archway drywall was particularly impressive. I have one of
those drywall hatchets somewhere... I ought to learn how to use it.
That looks far more efficient than the modern method of hanging it.

Far more efficient than 4 x 8, 4 x 12 or 4 x 16 sheets? I think not.

There's an awful lot of mudding that they didn't show. Way too many seams.


There is also drywall sheets of 4.5' and 5' widths. In the usual 8, 10, 12, 16 foot lengths. They make drywalling as efficient as possible. 8', 9', 10' ceiling heights. Two sheets will cover it.
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On 3/27/2021 4:14 PM, wrote:
On Sat, 27 Mar 2021 13:42:03 -0700 (PDT), Michael
wrote:

Skills.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8fZLM5S_ds

The lath & plaster video after it is pretty good too. My sheetrock
looks like a mess. This is amazing. Lots of mud winds up on the
floor, though.


I know and old electrician/developer/commercial property manager who
covered the floors in the house he was building with roofing paper
during construction. Well, it was probably 1/3 tape. The very last
thing done was the floors. When he was ready to do the floors he ripped
up all the paper and there was pristeen concrete ready for the flooring.
The paper more than half filled a large roll off construction
dumpster. (big house)

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Default Old School Drywaller

"Bob La Londe" wrote in message ...

I know and old electrician/developer/commercial property manager who
covered the floors in the house he was building with roofing paper during
construction. Well, it was probably 1/3 tape. The very last thing done
was the floors. When he was ready to do the floors he ripped up all the
paper and there was pristeen concrete ready for the flooring. The paper
more than half filled a large roll off construction dumpster. (big house)


I've done that with Rosen paper... and if there are finished floors there is
a cardboard product that comes in rolls that offers some dent protection
too. A recent renovation I visited while in process had Ram Board covering
the floors. https://www.americanfloormats.com/ramboard/

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Default Old School Drywaller

On 4/5/2021 9:51 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
"Bob La Londe"* wrote in message ...

I know and old electrician/developer/commercial property manager who
covered the floors in the house he was building with roofing paper
during construction.* Well, it was probably 1/3 tape.* The very last
thing done was the floors.* When he was ready to do the floors he
ripped up all the paper and there was pristeen concrete ready for the
flooring. The paper more than half filled a large roll off
construction dumpster.* (big house)


I've done that with Rosen paper... and if there are finished floors
there is a cardboard product that comes in rolls that offers some dent
protection too. A recent renovation I visited while in process had Ram
Board covering the floors. https://www.americanfloormats.com/ramboard/


Years ago my local Sam's Club allowed me to collect dozens of
cardboard dividers used to separate certain products stacked on pallets.
Taped together they protected the clients flooring during tearout,
drywall replacement, painting, and general foot traffic.

Dave in SoTex
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Default Old School Drywaller

On 4/15/2021 7:15 AM, Dave in SoTex wrote:
On 4/5/2021 9:51 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
"Bob La Londe"* wrote in message ...

I know and old electrician/developer/commercial property manager who
covered the floors in the house he was building with roofing paper
during construction.* Well, it was probably 1/3 tape.* The very last
thing done was the floors.* When he was ready to do the floors he
ripped up all the paper and there was pristeen concrete ready for the
flooring. The paper more than half filled a large roll off
construction dumpster.* (big house)


I've done that with Rosen paper... and if there are finished floors
there is a cardboard product that comes in rolls that offers some dent
protection too. A recent renovation I visited while in process had Ram
Board covering the floors. https://www.americanfloormats.com/ramboard/


Years ago my local Sam's Club allowed me to collect dozens of cardboard
dividers used to separate certain products stacked on pallets. Taped
together they protected the clients flooring during tearout, drywall
replacement, painting, and general foot traffic.

Dave in SoTex



For some reason I don't see those cardboard boxes anymore.


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Default Old School Drywaller

On 4/15/2021 11:05 AM, Leon wrote:

On 4/15/2021 7:15 AM, Dave in SoTex wrote:


Years ago my local Sam's Club allowed me to collect dozens of
cardboard dividers used to separate certain products stacked on
pallets. Taped together they protected the clients flooring during
tearout, drywall replacement, painting, and general foot traffic.

Dave in SoTex


For some reason I don't see those cardboard boxes anymore.


Just to be clear, the cardboard pieces were individual,flat,
pallet sized sheets. Picture a pallet with three or four levels of paper
towels or toilet or somesuch with a cardboard sheet between each level.
Perhaps my timing was just lucky such that I was able to access as
many exposed pieces as I did.
Only recall doing it the one time.

Dave in SoTex
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Default Old School Drywaller

Dave in SoTex writes:
On 4/15/2021 11:05 AM, Leon wrote:

On 4/15/2021 7:15 AM, Dave in SoTex wrote:


Years ago my local Sam's Club allowed me to collect dozens of
cardboard dividers used to separate certain products stacked on
pallets. Taped together they protected the clients flooring during
tearout, drywall replacement, painting, and general foot traffic.

Dave in SoTex


For some reason I don't see those cardboard boxes anymore.


Just to be clear, the cardboard pieces were individual,flat,
pallet sized sheets. Picture a pallet with three or four levels of paper
towels or toilet or somesuch with a cardboard sheet between each level.


We used to staple those cardboard squares (heavy tagboard, really) to the inner walls
of railroad boxcars to protect the bags of cornstarch we were loading.

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Default Old School Drywaller

On Thursday, April 15, 2021 at 8:15:33 AM UTC-4, Dave in SoTex wrote:
On 4/5/2021 9:51 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
"Bob La Londe" wrote in message ...

I know and old electrician/developer/commercial property manager who
covered the floors in the house he was building with roofing paper
during construction. Well, it was probably 1/3 tape. The very last
thing done was the floors. When he was ready to do the floors he
ripped up all the paper and there was pristeen concrete ready for the
flooring. The paper more than half filled a large roll off
construction dumpster. (big house)


I've done that with Rosen paper... and if there are finished floors
there is a cardboard product that comes in rolls that offers some dent
protection too. A recent renovation I visited while in process had Ram
Board covering the floors. https://www.americanfloormats.com/ramboard/

Years ago my local Sam's Club allowed me to collect dozens of
cardboard dividers used to separate certain products stacked on pallets.
Taped together they protected the clients flooring during tearout,
drywall replacement, painting, and general foot traffic.

Dave in SoTex


A few months ago I bought a 4 x 8 sheet of that white bumpy plastic
wall board, typically used for cheap bathroom upgrades. This stuff:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/PLAS-TEX...8615/311314398

While in HD, I cut it in half (4x4) to make it easier to get it into my van.
As it turned out, the material wasn't going to work for the project I
had in mind (heavy duty shelf liner) so it's been sitting in my garage.

A few weeks ago the town had to come into my house to fix a drain
issue and needed access to the clean out in my basement bathroom.
Suspecting that they were going to make a mess on the floor with their
camera, snake and other equipment, I trimmed the plastic wallboard to
fit the area where they needed to work and laid it down, smooth side up.

I was right, they made a mess, but clean up was as easy as carrying the
pieces outside and hosing them off. This process was repeated when
they came back a week later to install a CIPP sleeve. Again, cleanup
was a breeze.

Now I have to decide whether to hang onto it or toss it. It would probably
make a good surface for large glue-ups, painting projects, etc.

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Default Old School Drywaller

On Fri, 16 Apr 2021 08:15:53 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03
wrote:

On Thursday, April 15, 2021 at 8:15:33 AM UTC-4, Dave in SoTex wrote:
On 4/5/2021 9:51 PM, John Grossbohlin wrote:
"Bob La Londe" wrote in message ...

I know and old electrician/developer/commercial property manager who
covered the floors in the house he was building with roofing paper
during construction. Well, it was probably 1/3 tape. The very last
thing done was the floors. When he was ready to do the floors he
ripped up all the paper and there was pristeen concrete ready for the
flooring. The paper more than half filled a large roll off
construction dumpster. (big house)

I've done that with Rosen paper... and if there are finished floors
there is a cardboard product that comes in rolls that offers some dent
protection too. A recent renovation I visited while in process had Ram
Board covering the floors. https://www.americanfloormats.com/ramboard/

Years ago my local Sam's Club allowed me to collect dozens of
cardboard dividers used to separate certain products stacked on pallets.
Taped together they protected the clients flooring during tearout,
drywall replacement, painting, and general foot traffic.

Dave in SoTex


A few months ago I bought a 4 x 8 sheet of that white bumpy plastic
wall board, typically used for cheap bathroom upgrades. This stuff:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/PLAS-TEX...8615/311314398

While in HD, I cut it in half (4x4) to make it easier to get it into my van.
As it turned out, the material wasn't going to work for the project I
had in mind (heavy duty shelf liner) so it's been sitting in my garage.

A few weeks ago the town had to come into my house to fix a drain
issue and needed access to the clean out in my basement bathroom.
Suspecting that they were going to make a mess on the floor with their
camera, snake and other equipment, I trimmed the plastic wallboard to
fit the area where they needed to work and laid it down, smooth side up.

I was right, they made a mess, but clean up was as easy as carrying the
pieces outside and hosing them off. This process was repeated when
they came back a week later to install a CIPP sleeve. Again, cleanup
was a breeze.

Now I have to decide whether to hang onto it or toss it. It would probably
make a good surface for large glue-ups, painting projects, etc.


Toss it? I was thinking of starting a GoFundMe page to buy a sheet of
plywood.
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.... just can't have any good clean fun,
at the jobsite, any more :

https://www.blogto.com/city/2021/04/...homes-stipper/

John T.



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On Sat, 17 Apr 2021 08:00:51 -0400, wrote:


... just can't have any good clean fun,
at the jobsite, any more :

https://www.blogto.com/city/2021/04/...homes-stipper/

Humor is dead. I wouldn't want to be a professional comedian these
days.
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