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Old February 10th 20, 11:21 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?
Any thoughts appreciated.

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Old February 11th 20, 12:19 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

On Monday, February 10, 2020 at 6:21:15 PM UTC-5, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?
Any thoughts appreciated.


Is the back wall 10' or 6'?

What is the distance between supports?

18" shelves seem pretty deep for a pantry. Hard to reach the back of the
upper shelves. 16" (still deep) allows for 3 shelves per 48" length. Of
course, I don't know your layout, so I don't know your cut plan.

Edging on whatever you use will prevent sagging.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VRUAOgR1gA

The following is probably way overkill for a pantry, but it's what I did in
my garage. 3/4" plywood, 2 x 3 framing and 1 x 2's made from plywood strips
used as cleats along the walls. With edge supports front and rear, these
shelves won't ever sag. The side shelves are 16" deep, the rears are 20",
but they are for storing large heavy items, not typical pantry stuff.

https://i.imgur.com/QmnSJcA.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/0v44CJq.jpg






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Old February 11th 20, 12:58 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

Thanks DerbyDad. Gooe advise.
The back wall is the 10ft. length.
Like your garage shelves.
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Old February 11th 20, 01:22 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

On 2/10/2020 7:19 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?
Any thoughts appreciated.


If this is a pantry one of the considerations is cleanliness. While
solid shelve are impressive they can collect material on the shelves
and in the corners.

I have used the wire shelves for my closets, They are open and do not
create pockets of dead air as a solid shelf does. While I have fixed
installation with them fastened to the walls, you could also make them
adjustable.

I put shelves in a large closet in with a couple of hours work and
minimum debris.

This is similar to what I used in my closets.
SuperSlide 144 in. W x 16 in. D x 1 in. H White Ventilated Wall Mounted
Shelf Cost 26.98 at Home Depot.

The prince is comparable to using plywood shelving.
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Old February 11th 20, 02:28 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?
Any thoughts appreciated.


The Sagulator:
https://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

HTH


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Old February 11th 20, 03:20 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 15:21:12 -0800 (PST), Ivan Vegvary
wrote:

Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?
Any thoughts appreciated.



I used bifold closet doors on standard track type shelf brackets.

My second choice would be baltic (russian) plywood - 5/8 or 3/4 inch
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Old February 11th 20, 03:26 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

On Tue, 11 Feb 2020 02:28:44 +0000, Spalted Walt
wrote:

Ivan Vegvary wrote:

Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?
Any thoughts appreciated.


The Sagulator:
https://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

Highly recommended.
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Old February 11th 20, 05:45 AM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

On Monday, February 10, 2020 at 3:21:15 PM UTC-8, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?


Solid is the strongest, and you have the option to put a pretty wood on the leading edge.
Knotty softwood is the inexpensive way to go (vinyl surface
can be applied so the occasional leaky can won't hurt the wood). Biscuits are good.

Particle board will creep-sag with time, don't believe the 'sagulator' predictions. Plywood
is weaker than solid wood (half the grain runs the wrong way).

Uprights in plywood (it's tough) but be sure the glue is exterior; spills happen. If you
can stagger shelves, so the dados don't thin the uprights, that's a win.

A full-gallon pickle jar is under 12 inches.
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Old February 11th 20, 01:43 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

On 2/10/2020 5:21 PM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?
Any thoughts appreciated.


My specifically did not want deep shelves on her new pantry. We went
15" deep for the shelves.
18" will be wasteful, only 2 lengths out of a sheet of plywood if you go
18" You can get 3 with much less waste if you go just under 16".

I would go plywood, maybe even MDO, Medium Density Overlay. It has a
outer veneer very similar to formica, it looks like a brown paper sack
and is thin but it is very nice to work with and paints well. The inner
plies are the same as normal plywood. NOTHING like MDF.

Then stiffen with solid wood attached perpendicular to the plywood.
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Old February 11th 20, 02:39 PM posted to rec.woodworking
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Default Wide shelving advice needed

whit3rd writes:
On Monday, February 10, 2020 at 3:21:15 PM UTC-8, Ivan Vegvary wrote:
Tearing out sagging shelves in a 10ft. by 6ft. pantry. Would jike to put 18" deep shelves on the back wall. These would not be "cabinet" quality construction.
So, rip 18" wide plywood? Particle board? Bisquit join solid lumber?


Solid is the strongest, and you have the option to put a pretty wood on the leading edge.
Knotty softwood is the inexpensive way to go (vinyl surface
can be applied so the occasional leaky can won't hurt the wood). Biscuits are good.

Plywood
is weaker than solid wood (half the grain runs the wrong way).


Which actually makes it stronger.




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