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  #1   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Greg D.
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1 and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any special thing
to do the first time you start it?

Thanks for any help.

Greg D.
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Doug Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

In article , Greg D. wrote:
I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1 and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any special thing
to do the first time you start it?


Is your 220V circuit wired correctly? That is, do you really have 220V? Check
the voltage between L1 and L3. Do you see 220, or zero?

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #4   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Doug Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

In article , Greg D. wrote:
Hi Doug,

Yes, I do have 110V on each of them.


That's not the point -- what is the voltage *between* the two hot wires? Not
the voltage from each one to ground. The voltage from hot to hot. If they are
both on the same leg of your service, they'll each measure 110V to ground or
neutral, but *zero* between them.

I even looked at the switch and
on both ends I have 110V. Looks like the current doesn't go through
from the switch. That's why I'm wondering if there's something that
prevents the switch from closing the circuit.


Well, my first guess is that there is indeed something preventing the switch
from closing the circuit, and that "something" is that there isn't 220V
present between the two hot conductors.

Since it's a magnetic switch, maybe there's a reset button inside I
can trigger and make it work.


Check the voltage between the two hot conductors: is it 220V, or zero?

Thanks for helping!


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 17:30:09 GMT, (Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.

wrote:
I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1 and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any special thing
to do the first time you start it?


Is your 220V circuit wired correctly? That is, do you really have 220V? Check
the voltage between L1 and L3. Do you see 220, or zero?


--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)

It's time to throw all their damned tea in the harbor again.
  #5   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Bill
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

Was the saw wired for 220 or 110 volts? If it is wired for 110 the
magneitc starter has a 110 volt coil. You will need a neutral for the
coil to pull in the contacts. We need some more info. Is there an
overload block in the starter that needs resetting?

Bill



  #6   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Greg D.
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

Hi Doug,

Maybe you've spot the problem...

I get a reading of 0V between the 2 hots.

Here's my setup. I have a subpanel of 60Amps (4 x 15AMps breakers) in
my workshop. This subpanel get its current from the main panel via a
30Amps / 10-3 wire. The red and the black wires are on 2 different
15Amps breaker (in the main panel) and they feed 2 x 15Amps breakers
on each side.

I combined 2 15Amps breakers (the two in the middle) so each of them
are on one 15 Amps breaker in the main panel. I then fed my 220V
outlet (for the tablesaw) with those 2 hot wires (110V each).

Should I leave the voltmeter in the same settings to read the voltage
between two hot wires?

Thanks for helping me through this...


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 19:56:15 GMT, (Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D. wrote:
Hi Doug,

Yes, I do have 110V on each of them.


That's not the point -- what is the voltage *between* the two hot wires? Not
the voltage from each one to ground. The voltage from hot to hot. If they are
both on the same leg of your service, they'll each measure 110V to ground or
neutral, but *zero* between them.

I even looked at the switch and
on both ends I have 110V. Looks like the current doesn't go through
from the switch. That's why I'm wondering if there's something that
prevents the switch from closing the circuit.


Well, my first guess is that there is indeed something preventing the switch
from closing the circuit, and that "something" is that there isn't 220V
present between the two hot conductors.

Since it's a magnetic switch, maybe there's a reset button inside I
can trigger and make it work.


Check the voltage between the two hot conductors: is it 220V, or zero?

Thanks for helping!


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 17:30:09 GMT,
(Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.

wrote:
I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1 and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any special thing
to do the first time you start it?

Is your 220V circuit wired correctly? That is, do you really have 220V? Check
the voltage between L1 and L3. Do you see 220, or zero?

  #7   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Greg D.
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

Hi Bill,

The saw is a 3HP cabinet saw. I don't think it can even be wired for
110V. According to the "poor" documentation, the saw is ready for
220V/13.7Amps.

Thanks,

Greg D.


On 14 May 2006 13:38:04 -0700, "Bill" wrote:

Was the saw wired for 220 or 110 volts? If it is wired for 110 the
magneitc starter has a 110 volt coil. You will need a neutral for the
coil to pull in the contacts. We need some more info. Is there an
overload block in the starter that needs resetting?

Bill

  #8   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Doug Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

In article , Greg D. wrote:
Hi Doug,

Maybe you've spot the problem...

I get a reading of 0V between the 2 hots.

Here's my setup. I have a subpanel of 60Amps (4 x 15AMps breakers) in
my workshop. This subpanel get its current from the main panel via a
30Amps / 10-3 wire. The red and the black wires are on 2 different
15Amps breaker (in the main panel) and they feed 2 x 15Amps breakers
on each side.


It's time to stop what you're doing, and get a book on residential electrical
wiring -- or call a pro, or at least a buddy who understands this stuff. You
don't. No offense intended, but you don't. And messing around with electricity
when you don't understand it can get you KILLED.

In order to have a 220V circuit, you must have the two hot conductors coming
off of opposite legs of your service. It appears that your two 15A breakers
feeding the subpanel are on the *same* leg of the service. The only thing that
keeps this from being a *serious* fire hazard is the 10-3 wi you could be
putting as much as 30A of current on the neutral conductor in that 10-3 cable;
fortunately, that's OK -- but if you should ever swap those 15A breakers for
30s, you've got major trouble.

I combined 2 15Amps breakers (the two in the middle) so each of them
are on one 15 Amps breaker in the main panel.


It's not at all clear to me what you mean by this.

I then fed my 220V
outlet (for the tablesaw) with those 2 hot wires (110V each).

Should I leave the voltmeter in the same settings to read the voltage
between two hot wires?


Probably, but that depends on your voltmeter. Make sure that it's capable of
measuring 250V.

Thanks for helping me through this...


Again, no offense intended, but IMO you should stop what you're doing, and
bring in someone who understands it. If you happen to be in the Indianapolis
area, I can drop by...


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 19:56:15 GMT, (Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.

wrote:
Hi Doug,

Yes, I do have 110V on each of them.


That's not the point -- what is the voltage *between* the two hot wires? Not
the voltage from each one to ground. The voltage from hot to hot. If they are
both on the same leg of your service, they'll each measure 110V to ground or
neutral, but *zero* between them.

I even looked at the switch and
on both ends I have 110V. Looks like the current doesn't go through
from the switch. That's why I'm wondering if there's something that
prevents the switch from closing the circuit.


Well, my first guess is that there is indeed something preventing the switch
from closing the circuit, and that "something" is that there isn't 220V
present between the two hot conductors.

Since it's a magnetic switch, maybe there's a reset button inside I
can trigger and make it work.


Check the voltage between the two hot conductors: is it 220V, or zero?

Thanks for helping!


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 17:30:09 GMT,
(Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.
wrote:
I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1 and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any special thing
to do the first time you start it?

Is your 220V circuit wired correctly? That is, do you really have 220V?

Check
the voltage between L1 and L3. Do you see 220, or zero?


--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)

Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter
by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com
You must use your REAL email address to get a response.

Download Nfilter at
http://www.milmac.com/np-120.exe

  #9   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Roy Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

In article ,
Greg D. wrote:

I get a reading of 0V between the 2 hots.


That's a bad sign.

Here's my setup. I have a subpanel of 60Amps (4 x 15AMps breakers) in
my workshop. This subpanel get its current from the main panel via a
30Amps / 10-3 wire. The red and the black wires are on 2 different
15Amps breaker (in the main panel)


This sounds pretty strange too. I don't know if it's strictly against
code, but it's certainly unusual to have a subpanel fed by a 15A breaker.
Consider this scenario:

You've got a 15A breaker in the main panel, and downstream of that, you've
got several additional 15A breakers. You overload the circuit. Which 15A
breaker blows? Maybe the one in the subpanel, maybe the one in the main
panel, taking out everything in the subpanel at the same time. Like maybe
the lights?

It's also strange that somebody would run #10 wire protected by a 15A
breaker. You typically see #10 on a 30A breaker (assuming it's not a very
long run).

If everything you say is correct, I'm guessing whoever wired this stuff up
didn't really know what they were doing. I'd get a real electrician in
there to make sure things are kosher.
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Pop
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

Assuming you're in North America, which it sounds like:

It further sounds like your sub panel is miswired. Does ANY
other 220 outlet it feeds perform correctly? Is so, the sub
panel is botched. If not, the it's probably miswired inside the
panel.
Also, you seem to be talking about a "pair" of non-ganged ckt
breakers for the 220V: A definite NO-NO! You have to use
ganged ckt brkrs with 220 derived in that fashion.
There are two wires coming into your house, each with 110V on
them, but they are "out of phase" with each other, by 180
degrees. So, to get 220 you need a wire from each of those two.
What you have now is the SAME phase on each one, so that there is
0V difference, not 220V, between them.
It's simple, but not simple to explain on a ng.

Either DISCONNECT and quit until you get up to speed on what you
have to do, or get someone in who knows, not just thinks he
knows, the mistake you apparently made, what's up.
There's no shame in this; you've just missed a very important
part of the picture, and that spells out danger - a possibly
serious danger, in fact.

Please stop until you either fully understand what's happened, or
better yet, get someone in there who understands the situation.

Some people don't like to hear this, but if a non-code (which you
have) miswiring causes a fire, and your insurance company gets
wind of it, you will have NO insurance! Codes exist for very
real reasons, too.

If you absolutely insist on forging ahead with this, and you
haven't used Google, here are a couple of off the cuff links that
will get you started thinking in the right direction at least:
http://lists.contesting.com/_amps/2005-02/msg00255.html
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...220outlet.html
http://lists.contesting.com/_amps/2002-12/msg00169.html
http://experts.about.com/q/Electrica...utlet-near.htm

If nothing else, those will give you a hint as to what you're
missing in your knowledge base.

HTH,

Pop


"Greg D." wrote in message
...
Hi Doug,

Maybe you've spot the problem...

I get a reading of 0V between the 2 hots.

Here's my setup. I have a subpanel of 60Amps (4 x 15AMps
breakers) in
my workshop. This subpanel get its current from the main panel
via a
30Amps / 10-3 wire. The red and the black wires are on 2
different
15Amps breaker (in the main panel) and they feed 2 x 15Amps
breakers
on each side.

I combined 2 15Amps breakers (the two in the middle) so each of
them
are on one 15 Amps breaker in the main panel. I then fed my
220V
outlet (for the tablesaw) with those 2 hot wires (110V each).

Should I leave the voltmeter in the same settings to read the
voltage
between two hot wires?

Thanks for helping me through this...


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 19:56:15 GMT, (Doug
Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg
D. wrote:
Hi Doug,

Yes, I do have 110V on each of them.


That's not the point -- what is the voltage *between* the two
hot wires? Not
the voltage from each one to ground. The voltage from hot to
hot. If they are
both on the same leg of your service, they'll each measure 110V
to ground or
neutral, but *zero* between them.

I even looked at the switch and
on both ends I have 110V. Looks like the current doesn't go
through
from the switch. That's why I'm wondering if there's something
that
prevents the switch from closing the circuit.


Well, my first guess is that there is indeed something
preventing the switch
from closing the circuit, and that "something" is that there
isn't 220V
present between the two hot conductors.

Since it's a magnetic switch, maybe there's a reset button
inside I
can trigger and make it work.


Check the voltage between the two hot conductors: is it 220V,
or zero?

Thanks for helping!


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 17:30:09 GMT,
(Doug
Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg
D.
wrote:
I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V
outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the
table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General
cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1
and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads
properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to
make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one
just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the
motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any
special thing
to do the first time you start it?

Is your 220V circuit wired correctly? That is, do you really
have 220V? Check
the voltage between L1 and L3. Do you see 220, or zero?





  #11   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Roy Smith
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

In article ,
Greg D. wrote:

It's true, I had my 2 breakers on the same leg. I moved one over on
the other leg and got my 220V just right. I've done a lot of
electrical work but it was mostly on the plain 110V. I also know very
well the Amp vs. wire gauge so there was no fire hazard... in my
case.

I just didn't know 220V had to be taken from the 2 legs... I guess we
learn something new everyday...


It's good to learn stuff. Playing with 220V circuits when you don't know
what you're doing is not the right venue, however.

You can't just plug two breakers into different legs and call it a 220V
circuit. You need a two-pole breaker, so when one side trips, the other
side trips too.

Please go get an electrician to look over what you've done and make sure
it's all done right.
  #12   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
no(SPAM)vasys
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

Greg D. wrote:
Hi Doug,

Thank you very much for your help. The table saw is now working fine.

It's true, I had my 2 breakers on the same leg. I moved one over on
the other leg and got my 220V just right. I've done a lot of
electrical work but it was mostly on the plain 110V. I also know very
well the Amp vs. wire gauge so there was no fire hazard... in my
case.

I just didn't know 220V had to be taken from the 2 legs... I guess we
learn something new everyday...

Again, thank you very much for your help, it's appreciated.


Greg D.


The saw may be working but it sounds like your running it off of two
separate 15 amp / 110V breakers. This is unsafe and probably against
your local building codes. Change the breaker to a 15 amp / 220 volt
breaker (the two trip levers will be tied together by a bar).

--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA

(Remove -SPAM- to send email)
  #13   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
George M. Kazaka
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

Doug and Greg,
You do not need to be on both sides of the panel actually That is illegal,
You should have a breaker that is for 220 only
You can use two 110 breakers next to each other with a clip that unites
them, some inspecters do not like the clip setup because when one leg pops
it may not shut the other breaker.
If you are on both sides of the panel and one side shorts out you still have
power flowing through the other side.
The breaker box is designed so that every other breaker is connected to a
differant leg of the main bars that the power goes through the panel
Still the best bet is to get a 220 breaker to run a 220 line

Good Luck
George


"Greg D." wrote in message
...
Hi Doug,

Thank you very much for your help. The table saw is now working fine.

It's true, I had my 2 breakers on the same leg. I moved one over on
the other leg and got my 220V just right. I've done a lot of
electrical work but it was mostly on the plain 110V. I also know very
well the Amp vs. wire gauge so there was no fire hazard... in my
case.

I just didn't know 220V had to be taken from the 2 legs... I guess we
learn something new everyday...

Again, thank you very much for your help, it's appreciated.


Greg D.



On Sun, 14 May 2006 22:01:49 GMT, (Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.
wrote:
Hi Doug,

Maybe you've spot the problem...

I get a reading of 0V between the 2 hots.

Here's my setup. I have a subpanel of 60Amps (4 x 15AMps breakers) in
my workshop. This subpanel get its current from the main panel via a
30Amps / 10-3 wire. The red and the black wires are on 2 different
15Amps breaker (in the main panel) and they feed 2 x 15Amps breakers
on each side.


It's time to stop what you're doing, and get a book on residential
electrical
wiring -- or call a pro, or at least a buddy who understands this stuff.
You
don't. No offense intended, but you don't. And messing around with
electricity
when you don't understand it can get you KILLED.

In order to have a 220V circuit, you must have the two hot conductors
coming
off of opposite legs of your service. It appears that your two 15A
breakers
feeding the subpanel are on the *same* leg of the service. The only thing
that
keeps this from being a *serious* fire hazard is the 10-3 wi you could
be
putting as much as 30A of current on the neutral conductor in that 10-3
cable;
fortunately, that's OK -- but if you should ever swap those 15A breakers
for
30s, you've got major trouble.

I combined 2 15Amps breakers (the two in the middle) so each of them
are on one 15 Amps breaker in the main panel.


It's not at all clear to me what you mean by this.

I then fed my 220V
outlet (for the tablesaw) with those 2 hot wires (110V each).

Should I leave the voltmeter in the same settings to read the voltage
between two hot wires?


Probably, but that depends on your voltmeter. Make sure that it's capable
of
measuring 250V.

Thanks for helping me through this...


Again, no offense intended, but IMO you should stop what you're doing, and
bring in someone who understands it. If you happen to be in the
Indianapolis
area, I can drop by...


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 19:56:15 GMT,
(Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.
wrote:
Hi Doug,

Yes, I do have 110V on each of them.

That's not the point -- what is the voltage *between* the two hot wires?
Not
the voltage from each one to ground. The voltage from hot to hot. If
they are
both on the same leg of your service, they'll each measure 110V to
ground or
neutral, but *zero* between them.

I even looked at the switch and
on both ends I have 110V. Looks like the current doesn't go through
from the switch. That's why I'm wondering if there's something that
prevents the switch from closing the circuit.

Well, my first guess is that there is indeed something preventing the
switch
from closing the circuit, and that "something" is that there isn't 220V
present between the two hot conductors.

Since it's a magnetic switch, maybe there's a reset button inside I
can trigger and make it work.

Check the voltage between the two hot conductors: is it 220V, or zero?

Thanks for helping!


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 17:30:09 GMT,
(Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.
wrote:
I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1 and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any special thing
to do the first time you start it?

Is your 220V circuit wired correctly? That is, do you really have
220V?
Check
the voltage between L1 and L3. Do you see 220, or zero?



  #14   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Doug Miller
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

In article , Greg D. wrote:
Hi Doug,

Thank you very much for your help. The table saw is now working fine.

It's true, I had my 2 breakers on the same leg. I moved one over on
the other leg and got my 220V just right.


If you're not using a tandem breaker, you still don't have it "just right".
*Please* get someone who understands this stuff to help you.

I've done a lot of
electrical work but it was mostly on the plain 110V. I also know very
well the Amp vs. wire gauge so there was no fire hazard... in my
case.

I just didn't know 220V had to be taken from the 2 legs... I guess we
learn something new everyday...


Once again, no offense intended --- but if you didn't know that, you had
_no_business_ trying to wire a 220V circuit. Please at least get a book on
residential wiring and bring yourself up to speed before you do any more.

Again, thank you very much for your help, it's appreciated.


You're welcome -- I hope you don't create problems.


Greg D.



On Sun, 14 May 2006 22:01:49 GMT, (Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.

wrote:
Hi Doug,

Maybe you've spot the problem...

I get a reading of 0V between the 2 hots.

Here's my setup. I have a subpanel of 60Amps (4 x 15AMps breakers) in
my workshop. This subpanel get its current from the main panel via a
30Amps / 10-3 wire. The red and the black wires are on 2 different
15Amps breaker (in the main panel) and they feed 2 x 15Amps breakers
on each side.


It's time to stop what you're doing, and get a book on residential electrical
wiring -- or call a pro, or at least a buddy who understands this stuff. You
don't. No offense intended, but you don't. And messing around with electricity


when you don't understand it can get you KILLED.

In order to have a 220V circuit, you must have the two hot conductors coming
off of opposite legs of your service. It appears that your two 15A breakers
feeding the subpanel are on the *same* leg of the service. The only thing that


keeps this from being a *serious* fire hazard is the 10-3 wi you could be
putting as much as 30A of current on the neutral conductor in that 10-3 cable;


fortunately, that's OK -- but if you should ever swap those 15A breakers for
30s, you've got major trouble.

I combined 2 15Amps breakers (the two in the middle) so each of them
are on one 15 Amps breaker in the main panel.


It's not at all clear to me what you mean by this.

I then fed my 220V
outlet (for the tablesaw) with those 2 hot wires (110V each).

Should I leave the voltmeter in the same settings to read the voltage
between two hot wires?


Probably, but that depends on your voltmeter. Make sure that it's capable of
measuring 250V.

Thanks for helping me through this...


Again, no offense intended, but IMO you should stop what you're doing, and
bring in someone who understands it. If you happen to be in the Indianapolis
area, I can drop by...


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 19:56:15 GMT,
(Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.
wrote:
Hi Doug,

Yes, I do have 110V on each of them.

That's not the point -- what is the voltage *between* the two hot wires? Not


the voltage from each one to ground. The voltage from hot to hot. If they

are
both on the same leg of your service, they'll each measure 110V to ground or


neutral, but *zero* between them.

I even looked at the switch and
on both ends I have 110V. Looks like the current doesn't go through
from the switch. That's why I'm wondering if there's something that
prevents the switch from closing the circuit.

Well, my first guess is that there is indeed something preventing the switch


from closing the circuit, and that "something" is that there isn't 220V
present between the two hot conductors.

Since it's a magnetic switch, maybe there's a reset button inside I
can trigger and make it work.

Check the voltage between the two hot conductors: is it 220V, or zero?

Thanks for helping!


Benoit


On Sun, 14 May 2006 17:30:09 GMT,
(Doug Miller)
wrote:

In article , Greg D.
wrote:
I'm trying to wire my new cabinet saw for 220V. Got the 220V outlet,
installed the power cord onto the magnetic switch on the table saw
exactly as shown in the diagram.

For those interested in the details, I've got a General cabinet saw
(the Canada made one) and connected my power cord to the L1 and L3
screws. Each one gets its 110V of power. The meter reads properly but
it doesn't seem that the power reaches the other side to make the
motor run. I released the stop button and push the green one just to
see nothing. I even pushed the thermal reset button on the motor just
in case and still nothing.

Does anyone here have an idea what to do? Is there any special thing
to do the first time you start it?

Is your 220V circuit wired correctly? That is, do you really have 220V?
Check
the voltage between L1 and L3. Do you see 220, or zero?


--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)

Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter
by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com
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  #15   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Mike Marlow
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem


"Pop" wrote in message
news:uHP9g.1968$Y55.1783@trndny08...


Some people don't like to hear this, but if a non-code (which you
have) miswiring causes a fire, and your insurance company gets
wind of it, you will have NO insurance! Codes exist for very
real reasons, too.


Although everything else Pop posted with regard to the OP's wiring situation
is true, this one statement is not at all true. In most states, (if not
all), you are covered once your policy is instated. Insurance companies
must, and do pay for stupidity every day. Fires are investigated every day
and Cause & Origin Teams find faulty wiring to be the cause - every day.
Insurance policies pay off against these claims - every day. There is a lot
of urban legend surround insurance policy coverage but you would have to
look far and wide to find any substantial number of claims denied for
homeowner stupidity. Ask an adjuster when the last time was that they
actually saw a claim denied for faulty wiring.

--

-Mike-





  #16   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Pop
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

"Pop" wrote in message
news:uHP9g.1968$Y55.1783@trndny08...


Some people don't like to hear this, but if a non-code (which
you
have) miswiring causes a fire, and your insurance company gets
wind of it, you will have NO insurance! Codes exist for very
real reasons, too.


Although everything else Pop posted with regard to the OP's
wiring situation
is true, this one statement is not at all true. In most
states, (if not
all), you are covered once your policy is instated. Insurance
companies
must, and do pay for stupidity every day. Fires are
investigated every day
and Cause & Origin Teams find faulty wiring to be the cause -
every day.
Insurance policies pay off against these claims - every day.
There is a lot
of urban legend surround insurance policy coverage but you
would have to
look far and wide to find any substantial number of claims
denied for
homeowner stupidity. Ask an adjuster when the last time was
that they
actually saw a claim denied for faulty wiring.

--

-Mike-


Which state is which isn't relevant to this post, and only
implies a false sense of knowledge on the part of the poster.

Stupidity is NOT the same as intentional miswiring, nor is wiring
allowed to be done by unqualified personnel. They certainly will
refuse to pay, especially if the fire or insurance investigator
turns it up and finds the situation at hand: You are dead wrong.

Faulty wiring is NOT miswiring caused by unqulaified personnel,
who violated code. Huge differenct. You've gone outside your
area of knowledge here.

Some, actually very few, insurance companies pay off of
fraudulent claims, which is what you are defining. If wiring has
not been inspected and logged accordingly, the insurance
companies can and do/will take a hands off atitude toward the
claim.

Again, "homeowner stupidity" is A LOT MORE THAN JUST when an
unqualified person installs wiring incorrectly. And you can bet
your bottom dollar that when the death or fire or lawsuit caused
by a miswired, non-code, probably inherently unsafe connection
which has not had proper inspections performed, is discovered,
the insurance company will indeed wash their hands of the whole
thing.
I suggest this poster go and closely read his policy in full,
not just the little hype verbiage received with it. Read the
entire thing and you'll see just how easy it is for an insurance
company to refuse a claim. Your claim.

"Substantial" is an irrelevent and non-definitive word here. If
YOU are among the ten of a thousand or more who miswired your
home and burnt it down or electrocuted someone, or were sued
because someone received a bad shock, known as electrocution
(electrocution does not mean it killed), you had better have some
pretty deep pockets because your insurance won't help the second
they discover the non-code intentional installation of
sub-standard wiring techniques.
Now, I CAN INDEED (and have done so before) talk to a Code
Enforcement Officer who can cite such cases, and my neighbor, an
insurance broker, not an insurance salesman, can corroborate and
has corroborated such stories in the past. These things even
make the newspapers, of course.
A few years back, a men's clothing store owner burned down his
building. At the same time, he accidentally also burned down a
neighboring apartment building. I'll bet you think the apartment
building owner's insurance the tenant's property insurances all
paid off, don't you? You would be dead wrong! Those several
insurance companies got together and sued the clothing store
owner, HIS insurance company, the code enforcement office, and
some others I no longer recall. Of course, the arsonist owner
went to jail for 5 years.
How do I know all this? I knew BOTH owners. I went to school
with the arsonist. I was in the same club as the apt bldg owner.
And, it was well covered in the papers and radio for over a year
while they kept on discovering new things about the fire. It
took 8 months to prove it was arson, but they did it. Think how
easy it is to trace a 220 service back to two unconnected,
improperly installed ckt brkrs.

And finally, of COURSE the numbers of these events are small!
The majority of people DO IT RIGHT, OR GET IT RIGHT, OR HAVE IT
DONE RIGHT. Unlike you, who seems to think that because the
majority don't go to jail, or lose their life earnings, simply
because of the sheer ignorance you posted.

Don't cry fire in front of a fireman when it's a load of crap
that you're pusing out; people like you are disgusting and
obviously trolling, which means that I have nothing further to
say to you or to read from you.








  #17   Report Post  
Posted to rec.woodworking
Doug Brown
 
Posts: n/a
Default 220V Magnetic switch problem

I don't wish to start a war here, but do any of you have any actual
insurance experience? Or better yet, adjusting experience? I do, having
been in the business 34 years now. Granted, I live and work in Canada and
the rules here are somewhat different than in the US but unless someone mis
wired a tool or appliance with the express intention of causing a fire, the
policy would pay off.

As has been said, stupidity is not an excluded peril. Fire policies must
pay for fire losses. The only exceptions would be in a case where the
insured deliberately caused the loss. Then that insured would not be
covered, but other named insureds (wife, co-owner) might be.


"Pop" wrote in message
news:YH4ag.799$nq5.366@trndny06...
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

"Pop" wrote in message
news:uHP9g.1968$Y55.1783@trndny08...


Some people don't like to hear this, but if a non-code (which
you
have) miswiring causes a fire, and your insurance company gets
wind of it, you will have NO insurance! Codes exist for very
real reasons, too.


Although everything else Pop posted with regard to the OP's
wiring situation
is true, this one statement is not at all true. In most
states, (if not
all), you are covered once your policy is instated. Insurance
companies
must, and do pay for stupidity every day. Fires are
investigated every day
and Cause & Origin Teams find faulty wiring to be the cause -
every day.
Insurance policies pay off against these claims - every day.
There is a lot
of urban legend surround insurance policy coverage but you
would have to
look far and wide to find any substantial number of claims
denied for
homeowner stupidity. Ask an adjuster when the last time was
that they
actually saw a claim denied for faulty wiring.

--

-Mike-


Which state is which isn't relevant to this post, and only
implies a false sense of knowledge on the part of the poster.

Stupidity is NOT the same as intentional miswiring, nor is wiring
allowed to be done by unqualified personnel. They certainly will
refuse to pay, especially if the fire or insurance investigator
turns it up and finds the situation at hand: You are dead wrong.

Faulty wiring is NOT miswiring caused by unqulaified personnel,
who violated code. Huge differenct. You've gone outside your
area of knowledge here.

Some, actually very few, insurance companies pay off of
fraudulent claims, which is what you are defining. If wiring has
not been inspected and logged accordingly, the insurance
companies can and do/will take a hands off atitude toward the
claim.

Again, "homeowner stupidity" is A LOT MORE THAN JUST when an
unqualified person installs wiring incorrectly. And you can bet
your bottom dollar that when the death or fire or lawsuit caused
by a miswired, non-code, probably inherently unsafe connection
which has not had proper inspections performed, is discovered,
the insurance company will indeed wash their hands of the whole
thing.
I suggest this poster go and closely read his policy in full,
not just the little hype verbiage received with it. Read the
entire thing and you'll see just how easy it is for an insurance
company to refuse a claim. Your claim.

"Substantial" is an irrelevent and non-definitive word here. If
YOU are among the ten of a thousand or more who miswired your
home and burnt it down or electrocuted someone, or were sued
because someone received a bad shock, known as electrocution
(electrocution does not mean it killed), you had better have some
pretty deep pockets because your insurance won't help the second
they discover the non-code intentional installation of
sub-standard wiring techniques.
Now, I CAN INDEED (and have done so before) talk to a Code
Enforcement Officer who can cite such cases, and my neighbor, an
insurance broker, not an insurance salesman, can corroborate and
has corroborated such stories in the past. These things even
make the newspapers, of course.
A few years back, a men's clothing store owner burned down his
building. At the same time, he accidentally also burned down a
neighboring apartment building. I'll bet you think the apartment
building owner's insurance the tenant's property insurances all
paid off, don't you? You would be dead wrong! Those several
insurance companies got together and sued the clothing store
owner, HIS insurance company, the code enforcement office, and
some others I no longer recall. Of course, the arsonist owner
went to jail for 5 years.
How do I know all this? I knew BOTH owners. I went to school
with the arsonist. I was in the same club as the apt bldg owner.
And, it was well covered in the papers and radio for over a year
while they kept on discovering new things about the fire. It
took 8 months to prove it was arson, but they did it. Think how
easy it is to trace a 220 service back to two unconnected,
improperly installed ckt brkrs.

And finally, of COURSE the numbers of these events are small!
The majority of people DO IT RIGHT, OR GET IT RIGHT, OR HAVE IT
DONE RIGHT. Unlike you, who seems to think that because the
majority don't go to jail, or lose their life earnings, simply
because of the sheer ignorance you posted.

Don't cry fire in front of a fireman when it's a load of crap
that you're pusing out; people like you are disgusting and
obviously trolling, which means that I have nothing further to
say to you or to read from you.










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