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Default quality a thing of the past?

I had to wire wheel the brink and cotton down, it was heavily rusted.
I was marveling at how well it cleaned up, then compared it against my
Bessey from a garage sale. The brink and cotton's were my dads. So they
have to be over 50 years old, probably 60-70 years old.

Check out the larger swivelling pad (don't know what it's called).
Heavier threaded rod, and the through rod on the B&C is so well finished
compared to the bessey.

We used to make quality stuff here in the USA..


--
Jeff

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"woodchucker" wrote:

I had to wire wheel the brink and cotton down, it was heavily rusted.
I was marveling at how well it cleaned up, then compared it against
my
Bessey from a garage sale. The brink and cotton's were my dads. So
they
have to be over 50 years old, probably 60-70 years old.

--------------------------------------------------------
BTDT, wore out more than one wire wheel in the process.

Keep a center (prick) punch handy to set the buttons so they won't
come loose from the threaded rod.

BTW, Harry Epstein in Kanas City still sells replacement buttons
if you lose some.
-------------------------------------------------

Check out the larger swivelling pad (don't know what it's called).
Heavier threaded rod, and the through rod on the B&C is so well
finished
compared to the bessey.

--------------------------------------------------
Have you seen the junk Home Depot is selling under the Husky label?


Lew



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Default quality a thing of the past?

I agree. And also, the wastefulness of repairing a tool these days.
You almost have to toss it out compared to fixing, or buying a new one.
They are almost as much to fix or repair with parts, as they are to buy a
new one.
That is if you can even get the parts.
Yes, the threads, and pad, and even steel, is of high quality, and the size
works.
john

"woodchucker" wrote in message
...

I had to wire wheel the brink and cotton down, it was heavily rusted.
I was marveling at how well it cleaned up, then compared it against my
Bessey from a garage sale. The brink and cotton's were my dads. So they
have to be over 50 years old, probably 60-70 years old.

Check out the larger swivelling pad (don't know what it's called).
Heavier threaded rod, and the through rod on the B&C is so well finished
compared to the bessey.

We used to make quality stuff here in the USA..


--
Jeff

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Default quality a thing of the past?



"woodchucker" wrote in message
...

I had to wire wheel the brink and cotton down, it was heavily rusted.
I was marveling at how well it cleaned up, then compared it against my
Bessey from a garage sale. The brink and cotton's were my dads. So they
have to be over 50 years old, probably 60-70 years old.

Check out the larger swivelling pad (don't know what it's called).
Heavier threaded rod, and the through rod on the B&C is so well finished
compared to the bessey.

We used to make quality stuff here in the USA..
================================================== ================================================== ==
Look around, we still do. C clamps have been all over the place as for pad
size, screw size, tread type and material forever. No comparison unless you
are comparing the same make and model from different times.


--
Jeff

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"jloomis" wrote in message ...

I agree. And also, the wastefulness of repairing a tool these days.
You almost have to toss it out compared to fixing, or buying a new one.
They are almost as much to fix or repair with parts, as they are to buy a
new one.
That is if you can even get the parts.
Yes, the threads, and pad, and even steel, is of high quality, and the size
works.
john
================================================== ==================
You have to be dealing with some pretty spendy tools before they are worth
fixing. That is economics and is due to those tools being relatively cheap
compared to what they used to be.




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Default quality a thing of the past?

On Sat, 16 Mar 2013 20:53:41 -0700, "CW" wrote:



"jloomis" wrote in message ...

I agree. And also, the wastefulness of repairing a tool these days.
You almost have to toss it out compared to fixing, or buying a new one.
They are almost as much to fix or repair with parts, as they are to buy a
new one.
That is if you can even get the parts.
Yes, the threads, and pad, and even steel, is of high quality, and the size
works.
john
================================================= ===================
You have to be dealing with some pretty spendy tools before they are worth
fixing. That is economics and is due to those tools being relatively cheap
compared to what they used to be.


One of the problems is the consumer. Many people think that Home
Depot has everything made and everything you will ever need at a very
low price. They have never been to a real tool store that carries the
better brands
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Default quality a thing of the past?

Good Quality and repairable are tools that I use.
Most tools break down after abuse.
All tools get abuse especially in a remodel, and or construction project.
I have had some tools that "used" to be repairable with kits purchased at
the store.
This has no longer been the case.
Pneumatic tools especially.
Now, instead of an "O" ring kit, and nylon replacement sleeves, and pistons,
etc.,
you are forced to send it to the tool repair shop.
I used to be able to repair tools on my tail gate if need be.
Brushes, chucks, cords, regulators, filters, belts.......
Anyway, we like to advocate the use of recyclable bags, but I know the
problem goes deeper than that.
Go to the dump and look at all the bicycles and BBq's in the pile.
It is amazing.
Same with computer, and electronics.
I have a garden shovel that I almost threw out yesterday if not 2 years ago.
A simple repair, and it is as good as new.
In America, and elsewhere we have become a use it once, and toss it culture.
It will eventually hurt us.
Look at all the plastic white chairs you see hanging around, that are split
and ruined.
Remember when Coke bottles were recyclable?
Now they want to get back to that again....
hummm

"CW" wrote in message
m...



"jloomis" wrote in message ...

I agree. And also, the wastefulness of repairing a tool these days.
You almost have to toss it out compared to fixing, or buying a new one.
They are almost as much to fix or repair with parts, as they are to buy a
new one.
That is if you can even get the parts.
Yes, the threads, and pad, and even steel, is of high quality, and the size
works.
john
================================================== ==================
You have to be dealing with some pretty spendy tools before they are worth
fixing. That is economics and is due to those tools being relatively cheap
compared to what they used to be.

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Default quality a thing of the past?

woodchucker wrote:
I had to wire wheel the brink and cotton down, it was heavily rusted. I
was marveling at how well it cleaned up, then compared it against my
Bessey from a garage sale. The brink and cotton's were my dads. So they
have to be over 50 years old, probably 60-70 years old.

Check out the larger swivelling pad (don't know what it's called).
Heavier threaded rod, and the through rod on the B&C is so well
finished compared to the bessey.

We used to make quality stuff here in the USA..

--
Jeff


I actually bought a couple of Cotton bar clamps about 20~25 years ago. The
clamp end slides and uses a BB like steel ball that indents and locks onto
the bar. IIRC they are about 18" long.
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I am a big fan of quality wood work.I really enjoy such a nice stuff from all the nice people.Thanks to every one.
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