Woodturning (rec.crafts.woodturning) To discuss tools, techniques, styles, materials, shows and competitions, education and educational materials related to woodturning. All skill levels are welcome, from art turners to production turners, beginners to masters.

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Old October 22nd 08, 12:02 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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I'm tom koehler, from Two Harbors Minnesota. Retired last year from 32 years
on the railroad as a trackworker (primary job in the track dep't was track
welder). I have been making sawdust in my very small basement with a
Shopsmith for 35 years. I am aware of most of its shortcomings as a lathe,
tablesaw, drill press and anything lese asked of it, but by golly with the
space I have, it is my only recourse. As a consequence, I live by the words
of a tagline in a popular song of some years ago, "If you can't have the
tools you love, then love the tools you're with..." or something like that.

I have found that if my block of wood is not perfectly balanced, the SS will
dance a pretty jig, when I am not in the mood for dancing. As mentioned here
in another thread, the speed reducer for the SS is kind of a kludge, but if
used with smaller blocks, the work is manageable.
I'm self-taught on the lathe, from books - mostly "The Wood-Turning Lathe" by
Haines, Adams, et al. pub. 1952, Van Nostrand. This was my dad's book. He had
a SS from that period, and I remeber watching him in his little garage shop,
making some Keene's cement lamps from one of the projects in this book.

My lathe work has been mainly smallish things of a wide variety, mostly
between centers. I have done some faceplate work, split turnings (brown paper
and white glue) and chuck work with purpose-make friction-fit wood chucks.

I'll scan through and read postings on this NG on a regular basis, to pick up
useful bits of info, and try to post stuff if it is within my realm of
experience. From what I have read here so far, you folks are some pretty
serious turners and way the heck out of my league, so am not sure what I can
contribute of value to you. I will have plenty of questions, though.

first Q: what is "CA"? I keep seeing references to it, with no idea exacctly
what it is. I have not seen references to a FAQ for this NG, so will gladly
go to it, if there is one.

second Q: I tried going to
http://www.shopss.net/books/WoodTurn...odTurning.html to get a
gander at the book referred to, but could not get in. Message said I didn't
have clearance or permission, or similar message. Another person in this NG
apparently ahs this same book on his website, but no reference where that
site was. Am interested in looking at this book, I think, so am hoping to get
pointed in the right direction.

third Q: refers to a particular type of grind on a bowl turning gouge. Ah, I
am in pretty near perfect woodturner's isolation here, folks, so will need a
more thorough background in bowl turning gouge technology, here, I think. My
tool set is limited so far, to a set of basic Craftsman turning tools a
couple of home-brew tools, and a hefty gouge I bought from a tool catalog
many years ago. Has a peculiar looking (to me, anyway) grind on its end -
intended for bowl work. I've had mixed results with it, and so will be
looking for a clue, again.

Enough for now, so here is a virtual shot and a beer for you if you want it,
for getting this far. Thanks for your time.
tom koehler


--
I will find a way or make one.


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Old October 22nd 08, 02:26 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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On Oct 21, 7:02 pm, tom koehler
wrote:
I'm tom koehler, from Two Harbors Minnesota. Retired last year from 32 years
on the railroad as a trackworker (primary job in the track dep't was track
welder). I have been making sawdust in my very small basement with a
Shopsmith for 35 years. I am aware of most of its shortcomings as a lathe,
tablesaw, drill press and anything lese asked of it, but by golly with the
space I have, it is my only recourse. As a consequence, I live by the words
of a tagline in a popular song of some years ago, "If you can't have the
tools you love, then love the tools you're with..." or something like that.

I have found that if my block of wood is not perfectly balanced, the SS will
dance a pretty jig, when I am not in the mood for dancing. As mentioned here
in another thread, the speed reducer for the SS is kind of a kludge, but if
used with smaller blocks, the work is manageable.
I'm self-taught on the lathe, from books - mostly "The Wood-Turning Lathe" by
Haines, Adams, et al. pub. 1952, Van Nostrand. This was my dad's book. He had
a SS from that period, and I remeber watching him in his little garage shop,
making some Keene's cement lamps from one of the projects in this book.

My lathe work has been mainly smallish things of a wide variety, mostly
between centers. I have done some faceplate work, split turnings (brown paper
and white glue) and chuck work with purpose-make friction-fit wood chucks.

I'll scan through and read postings on this NG on a regular basis, to pick up
useful bits of info, and try to post stuff if it is within my realm of
experience. From what I have read here so far, you folks are some pretty
serious turners and way the heck out of my league, so am not sure what I can
contribute of value to you. I will have plenty of questions, though.

first Q: what is "CA"? I keep seeing references to it, with no idea exacctly
what it is. I have not seen references to a FAQ for this NG, so will gladly
go to it, if there is one.

second Q: I tried going tohttp://www.shopss.net/books/WoodTurning/CourseWoodTurning.htmlto get a
gander at the book referred to, but could not get in. Message said I didn't
have clearance or permission, or similar message. Another person in this NG
apparently ahs this same book on his website, but no reference where that
site was. Am interested in looking at this book, I think, so am hoping to get
pointed in the right direction.

third Q: refers to a particular type of grind on a bowl turning gouge. Ah, I
am in pretty near perfect woodturner's isolation here, folks, so will need a
more thorough background in bowl turning gouge technology, here, I think. My
tool set is limited so far, to a set of basic Craftsman turning tools a
couple of home-brew tools, and a hefty gouge I bought from a tool catalog
many years ago. Has a peculiar looking (to me, anyway) grind on its end -
intended for bowl work. I've had mixed results with it, and so will be
looking for a clue, again.

Enough for now, so here is a virtual shot and a beer for you if you want it,
for getting this far. Thanks for your time.
tom koehler

--
I will find a way or make one.


Hi Tom,
always glad to see a new name so welcome aboard.
CA glue is crazy glue or Cyano Acrylate glue. Lots of different brand
names but a quick search on Google will fill you in.
I can't get into the book site either.
Grinds on gouges there are lots of write ups and how to's along with
pictures etc. Again do a Google for "gouge grind" and about 250 pages
come up.
hope this helps :-)
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Old October 22nd 08, 04:13 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Posts: 235
Default introducing new reader here

On Tue, 21 Oct 2008 20:26:30 -0500, Canchippy wrote
(in message
):


Hi Tom,
always glad to see a new name so welcome aboard.
CA glue is crazy glue or Cyano Acrylate glue. Lots of different brand
names but a quick search on Google will fill you in.
I can't get into the book site either.
Grinds on gouges there are lots of write ups and how to's along with
pictures etc. Again do a Google for "gouge grind" and about 250 pages
come up.
hope this helps :-)



thanks for the reply, Canchippy. Crazy glue... who'd a thunk? I use it on my
own cuts, never considered woodturnings. heh.
tom k.

--
I will find a way or make one.

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Old October 22nd 08, 08:28 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Dec 2007
Posts: 76
Default introducing new reader here

tom koehler wrote in
net.net:

I'm tom koehler, from Two Harbors Minnesota. Retired last year from 32
years on the railroad as a trackworker (primary job in the track dep't
was track welder). I have been making sawdust in my very small
basement with a Shopsmith for 35 years. I am aware of most of its
shortcomings as a lathe, tablesaw, drill press and anything lese asked
of it, but by golly with the space I have, it is my only recourse. As
a consequence, I live by the words of a tagline in a popular song of
some years ago, "If you can't have the tools you love, then love the
tools you're with..." or something like that.

I have found that if my block of wood is not perfectly balanced, the
SS will dance a pretty jig, when I am not in the mood for dancing. As
mentioned here in another thread, the speed reducer for the SS is kind
of a kludge, but if used with smaller blocks, the work is manageable.
I'm self-taught on the lathe, from books - mostly "The Wood-Turning
Lathe" by Haines, Adams, et al. pub. 1952, Van Nostrand. This was my
dad's book. He had a SS from that period, and I remeber watching him
in his little garage shop, making some Keene's cement lamps from one
of the projects in this book.

My lathe work has been mainly smallish things of a wide variety,
mostly between centers. I have done some faceplate work, split
turnings (brown paper and white glue) and chuck work with purpose-make
friction-fit wood chucks.

I'll scan through and read postings on this NG on a regular basis, to
pick up useful bits of info, and try to post stuff if it is within my
realm of experience. From what I have read here so far, you folks are
some pretty serious turners and way the heck out of my league, so am
not sure what I can contribute of value to you. I will have plenty of
questions, though.

first Q: what is "CA"? I keep seeing references to it, with no idea
exacctly what it is. I have not seen references to a FAQ for this NG,
so will gladly go to it, if there is one.

second Q: I tried going to
http://www.shopss.net/books/WoodTurn...odTurning.html to get
a gander at the book referred to, but could not get in. Message said I
didn't have clearance or permission, or similar message. Another
person in this NG apparently ahs this same book on his website, but no
reference where that site was. Am interested in looking at this book,
I think, so am hoping to get pointed in the right direction.

third Q: refers to a particular type of grind on a bowl turning gouge.
Ah, I am in pretty near perfect woodturner's isolation here, folks, so
will need a more thorough background in bowl turning gouge technology,
here, I think. My tool set is limited so far, to a set of basic
Craftsman turning tools a couple of home-brew tools, and a hefty gouge
I bought from a tool catalog many years ago. Has a peculiar looking
(to me, anyway) grind on its end - intended for bowl work. I've had
mixed results with it, and so will be looking for a clue, again.

Enough for now, so here is a virtual shot and a beer for you if you
want it, for getting this far. Thanks for your time.
tom koehler



Welcome tom. I can't get into the website either, but I think Darrell
Feltmate has the book on his website. http://www.aroundthewoods.com/
Darrell's website can probably answer most if not all of your questions.
Regards,
Hank
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Old October 22nd 08, 08:42 AM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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On Oct 22, 2:28*am, Hank wrote:
tom koehler


Welcome tom. I can't get into the website either, but I think Darrell
Feltmate has the book on his website.http://www.aroundthewoods.com/
Darrell's website can probably answer most if not all of your questions.


Hello, Tom. Welcome aboard. Feel free to post anything you like, and
remember, we all started somewhere.

I agree with Hank, Darrell's website is a must.

You can check out a lot of different grinds (bowl grinds, mostly if I
remember right) he

http://tinyurl.com/b4mlv

Look in the upper left hand corner (not all the way up) , and you will
see a line named "message boards". Click that one, and you will get
another page that has three buttons on it listing the different areas
of the forums. You will see TURNING there, and you can get the rest.

The best thing about that site is the archives (just like here) are
searchable, and you can get a ton of information on just about any
aspect of turning with a few clicks.

Hope to see you here often.

Robert


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Old October 22nd 08, 01:25 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Posts: 354
Default introducing new reader here

tom koehler writes:

third Q: refers to a particular type of grind on a bowl turning gouge. Ah, I
am in pretty near perfect woodturner's isolation here, folks, so will need a
more thorough background in bowl turning gouge technology, here, I think. My
tool set is limited so far, to a set of basic Craftsman turning tools a
couple of home-brew tools, and a hefty gouge I bought from a tool catalog
many years ago. Has a peculiar looking (to me, anyway) grind on its end -
intended for bowl work. I've had mixed results with it, and so will be
looking for a clue, again.


There are several grinds for bowl turning gouges.
Irish, Ellsworth, Fingernail, etc.


This is a complicated topic, and I'm not a real expert.

But it has to do with the way the grind is done, and the shape of the
gouge.

Bowl gouges are deeper than spindle gouges.

Think of it this way.

For a roughing gouge, I place the gouge in a sharpening jig, and
rotate it around the handle as an axis. This is the easiest grind for
a bowl gouge.

If you were using a round nose scraper, the pivot point is not down
the middle of the handle, but a point near the end of the
scraper. That's a side-to-side pivot, instead of a rotate pivot.

In between, there are more complicated grinds. The fingernail grind is
like the roughing gouge, but as you get near the end, you push the
gouge up. So it pivots up and down.

In other grinds, the pivot point is off to the side. Imagine you stick
a piece of wood perpendicular to the tool, and rotate on that
point. This sort of grind needs a jig to be reproducible. Options a

Ellsworth jig
Wolverine Vari-Grind
Tormek Gouge Jig
Homemade jigs

The Ellsworth and Irish grinds need a jig. The advantages is the
number of different ways you can use a single tool. I attended a local
lecture, and I think he mentioned 7 different ways you can cut with
such a grind. Normally one rides the bevel to prevent digging in. One
variation includes holding the tool "upside down" and scraping with
the edge (and only the edge) on the bowl.

These techniques are hard to learn from a book.

But these grinds are very personal. I have a Tormek system, and one
recommendation is to use a standard grind, and using the Tormek
features, slowly change a tool's profile so that is is more like a
Ellsworth. Try it. That way you slowly get used to the new profile.

Here's one picture of a traditional and fingernail grind.

http://www.aawforum.org/photopost/sh...=5556&size=big

Here's more info
http://www.woodturningdesign.com/askdale/14/14.shtml
http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com/irish-grind.html

In any case, you don't want to ruin your favorite tool. Experiment
with different shapes, but I'd buy a new gouge for experimentation.
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Old October 22nd 08, 01:27 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default introducing new reader here

" writes:

You can check out a lot of different grinds (bowl grinds, mostly if I
remember right) he

http://tinyurl.com/b4mlv


Thanks, Robert! I just bookmarked that site!
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Old October 22nd 08, 05:23 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default introducing new reader here

One excellent bowl turning DVD is by Bill Grumbine. He takes you
through just about everything from tools, techniques, and chainsaw
use. It is really highly recomended. Also, there are a lot of clips on
U Tube.
robo hippy

On Oct 22, 5:27*am, Maxwell Lol wrote:
" writes:
You can check out a lot of different grinds (bowl grinds, mostly if I
remember right) he


*http://tinyurl.com/b4mlv


Thanks, Robert! I just bookmarked that site!


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Old October 22nd 08, 07:18 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default introducing new reader here

Tom
Welcome to the woodturning zoo. CA as you have been told is just Super
Glue (one of its many brand names). It comes in thin, thicker and
thickest but most of us use more thin and medium for woodworking than we
do thick. I appreciate the many kind words about my web site. It is over
at http://aroundthewoods.com/ I recommend making the sharpening jig at
http://aroundthewoods.com/sharpening01.html
I think the book you want is over at
http://aroundthewoods.com/book1/preface.html
Any questions just ask away. This group is good to answer. Chime in any
one else's thread. We are all trying to learn here.

Darrell Feltmate
http://aroundthewoods.com

robo hippy wrote:
One excellent bowl turning DVD is by Bill Grumbine. He takes you
through just about everything from tools, techniques, and chainsaw
use. It is really highly recomended. Also, there are a lot of clips on
U Tube.
robo hippy

On Oct 22, 5:27 am, Maxwell Lol wrote:
" writes:
You can check out a lot of different grinds (bowl grinds, mostly if I
remember right) he
http://tinyurl.com/b4mlv

Thanks, Robert! I just bookmarked that site!


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Old October 22nd 08, 08:04 PM posted to rec.crafts.woodturning
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Default introducing new reader here

On Wed, 22 Oct 2008 2:28:51 -0500, Hank wrote
(in message ):



Welcome tom. I can't get into the website either, but I think Darrell
Feltmate has the book on his website. http://www.aroundthewoods.com/
Darrell's website can probably answer most if not all of your questions.
Regards,
Hank



Thanks for your reply. I'll give the site a look.
tom koehler
--
I will find a way or make one.



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