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  #41   Report Post  
Old July 31st 20, 12:55 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Stick welding revelation

On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 12:26:04 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

On 31/07/2020 10:43, T i m wrote:
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 09:03:54 +0100, Muddymike
wrote:

snip

Ive always thought stick welding was a black art.


Not black art but one of those things where 1) it's much easier using
the right gear 2) in the right position 3) on the right job (to start
with especially) and 4) ideally with a mentor to give you tips re the
approach and what is right (setup wise, rather than what should right.
The books / chart says 60A but in fact on that particular setup you
actually *need* 75A etc).


I have found being able to get into a comfortable position helps greatly
- even simple things like when using a new (i.e. long) rod,


Oh, absolutely, irrespective of the log rod etc. But then I guess that
applies to most things? weg

using my
free hand to prop the electrode somewhere nearer the business end, makes
for a much easier job of keeping it where you want and not waggling all
over the place!


Yup, (although you need decent hand protection for that) and again,
yer overall position (you and the job) can determine how easy things
can be.

p.s. Whilst I could weld (stick / gas) and had my own gear from an
early age, I got loads of good mentoring from a coded welder who
really did make it look so easy. Even welding a h/d pipe overhead in
cramped conditions. ;-)


I count anything under 2' from the ground as cramped conditions these days!


I'm still ok on my haunches (for a short time) but cant just spring up
from that position like I used to. So, on the floor is ok, or sitting
an a low to high stool or standing is ok. Welding overhead can be
'fun' for other reasons than lack of comfort.

When I replaced the 8' square up-and-over garage door that came with
my (what was to be) workshop, I replaced it with a square arch
'subframe' (100x100x12mm" angle) and 3 fanlites at the top and a
bi-fold door and personal door at the bottom (doors 6'6" high).

I dragged out the stick welder to weld the top fillets as I needed
something a bit 'punchy'. I was ok, up on the platform, my mate below,
steadying it whist I got the tacks in, not so. I think I had to treat
him to a new jumper. ;-)

The top frame / opening windows were all in lighter angle (wired
glass) and the doors were 50x25x1.5mm steel box, clad on the inside
with steel sheet (so that could be skinned with something more
decorative on the outside within the frames).

I put the horizontal steel cutting bandsaw, MIG welder and (very old,
bought with the SIP 150) B&D 'Pro' angle grinder to good use on that
project. ;-)

Cheers, T i m

  #42   Report Post  
Old July 31st 20, 06:19 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Stick welding revelation

In message ,
newshound writes
On 31/07/2020 09:03, Muddymike wrote:




Ive always thought stick welding was a black art. You've now inspired
me to buy some rods and try out the the electrode holder that came
with my inverter MIG.
Mike


Start with thinner sticks! They are less sticky.


If the rod sticks, wind up the current setting.

Right rod for the job. Thicker steel=thicker rods.

Rule 2, bend the rod. This allows you to watch the weld progressing
without the stick holder getting in the way.

--
Tim Lamb
  #43   Report Post  
Old August 1st 20, 02:13 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Stick welding revelation

On 31/07/2020 12:55, T i m wrote:

I put the horizontal steel cutting bandsaw, MIG welder and (very old,
bought with the SIP 150) B&D 'Pro' angle grinder to good use on that
project. ;-)


One of the detachable mains lead "Proline" jobbies?

(I still have one going strong that I got in the late 80's)


--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/
  #44   Report Post  
Old August 1st 20, 04:35 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Stick welding revelation

On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 14:13:05 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

On 31/07/2020 12:55, T i m wrote:

I put the horizontal steel cutting bandsaw, MIG welder and (very old,
bought with the SIP 150) B&D 'Pro' angle grinder to good use on that
project. ;-)


One of the detachable mains lead "Proline" jobbies?


No, not on mine John but I did replace the std mains lead for a much
longer (orange) one as you *typically* have to plug them into an
extension lead to be able to do anything other than just stuff on the
bench.

(I still have one going strong that I got in the late 80's)


Mine is black, if that helps (I'll see if the info plate is still on
there the next time I go to the workshop).

But that's got me thinking ... could it be a Bosch pro ... black
rather than green?

Cheers, T i m

  #45   Report Post  
Old August 1st 20, 11:24 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Stick welding revelation

On 01/08/2020 16:35, T i m wrote:
On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 14:13:05 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

On 31/07/2020 12:55, T i m wrote:

I put the horizontal steel cutting bandsaw, MIG welder and (very old,
bought with the SIP 150) B&D 'Pro' angle grinder to good use on that
project. ;-)


One of the detachable mains lead "Proline" jobbies?


No, not on mine John but I did replace the std mains lead for a much
longer (orange) one as you *typically* have to plug them into an
extension lead to be able to do anything other than just stuff on the
bench.

(I still have one going strong that I got in the late 80's)


Mine is black, if that helps (I'll see if the info plate is still on
there the next time I go to the workshop).

But that's got me thinking ... could it be a Bosch pro ... black
rather than green?


Bosch pro is normally blue...

My AG looks like:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...ne115mmAG.jpeg



--
Cheers,

John.

/================================================== ===============\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\================================================= ================/


  #46   Report Post  
Old August 2nd 20, 10:44 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 10,494
Default Stick welding revelation

On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 23:24:56 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

On 01/08/2020 16:35, T i m wrote:
On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 14:13:05 +0100, John Rumm
wrote:

On 31/07/2020 12:55, T i m wrote:

I put the horizontal steel cutting bandsaw, MIG welder and (very old,
bought with the SIP 150) B&D 'Pro' angle grinder to good use on that
project. ;-)

One of the detachable mains lead "Proline" jobbies?


No, not on mine John but I did replace the std mains lead for a much
longer (orange) one as you *typically* have to plug them into an
extension lead to be able to do anything other than just stuff on the
bench.

(I still have one going strong that I got in the late 80's)


Mine is black, if that helps (I'll see if the info plate is still on
there the next time I go to the workshop).

But that's got me thinking ... could it be a Bosch pro ... black
rather than green?


Bosch pro is normally blue...

My AG looks like:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/...ne115mmAG.jpeg


Hmm, no, not like that, mine has a suicide slider switch on the top
(or side) you work with your thumb?

Possibly like this: (The problem is that I have several AG's and so
the image of them blends into one). ;-(

https://webimg.secondhandapp.com/1.1...1cbe0ec9eba14d

Cheers, T i m


  #47   Report Post  
Old August 3rd 20, 11:15 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Stick welding revelation

On 29/7/20 11:29 am, williamwright wrote:
On 29/07/2020 02:06, John Rumm wrote:

So moral of the story, I wish I had gone for something like it years
ago, and I now have a new found respect for IGBT inverter arc welders
- they make the whole process quite civilised!


Tell me exactly what to buy. Seriously. The welder I bought for £50 in
1976 is beginning to get on my nerves a bit.

Bill

I got one of these and it is the most amazing thing since sliced bread,

https://tinyurl.com/yxe2at3m
it is tiny, weighs almost nothing and welds up to 3.2 electrodes with
ease I was in the electrical game and back in the day of transformers
none of us would have believed it possible what this little inverter
does,dc is easier to weld with.
I also have a bigger MIG with optional stick leads.Could carry it
anywhere, up a pole hanging off your belt if you wished.
  #48   Report Post  
Old August 3rd 20, 11:39 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Default Stick welding revelation

On Mon, 3 Aug 2020 20:15:34 +1000, F Murtz
wrote:

On 29/7/20 11:29 am, williamwright wrote:
On 29/07/2020 02:06, John Rumm wrote:

So moral of the story, I wish I had gone for something like it years
ago, and I now have a new found respect for IGBT inverter arc welders
- they make the whole process quite civilised!


Tell me exactly what to buy. Seriously. The welder I bought for 50 in
1976 is beginning to get on my nerves a bit.

Bill

I got one of these and it is the most amazing thing since sliced bread,

https://tinyurl.com/yxe2at3m
it is tiny, weighs almost nothing and welds up to 3.2 electrodes with
ease I was in the electrical game and back in the day of transformers
none of us would have believed it possible what this little inverter
does,dc is easier to weld with.
I also have a bigger MIG with optional stick leads.Could carry it
anywhere, up a pole hanging off your belt if you wished.


What sort of duty cycle OOI?

Cheers, T i m
  #49   Report Post  
Old August 3rd 20, 12:07 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 7,036
Default Stick welding revelation

On 03/08/2020 11:39, T i m wrote:
On Mon, 3 Aug 2020 20:15:34 +1000, F Murtz
wrote:

On 29/7/20 11:29 am, williamwright wrote:
On 29/07/2020 02:06, John Rumm wrote:

So moral of the story, I wish I had gone for something like it years
ago, and I now have a new found respect for IGBT inverter arc welders
- they make the whole process quite civilised!

Tell me exactly what to buy. Seriously. The welder I bought for £50 in
1976 is beginning to get on my nerves a bit.

Bill

I got one of these and it is the most amazing thing since sliced bread,

https://tinyurl.com/yxe2at3m
it is tiny, weighs almost nothing and welds up to 3.2 electrodes with
ease I was in the electrical game and back in the day of transformers
none of us would have believed it possible what this little inverter
does,dc is easier to weld with.
I also have a bigger MIG with optional stick leads.Could carry it
anywhere, up a pole hanging off your belt if you wished.


What sort of duty cycle OOI?

Cheers, T i m

It would be interesting to know how many amps it really delivers. There
are youtube videos showing that some of the Chinese stuff doesn't meet
the claims.

But welding 3.2 is impressive. My Lidl cheapy (£75 or so) won't go
beyond 2. Or at least, not for me :-).

I agree that they are amazing, though.
  #50   Report Post  
Old August 3rd 20, 12:12 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Posts: 2,582
Default Stick welding revelation

On 03/08/2020 11:39:30, T i m wrote:
On Mon, 3 Aug 2020 20:15:34 +1000, F Murtz
wrote:

On 29/7/20 11:29 am, williamwright wrote:
On 29/07/2020 02:06, John Rumm wrote:

So moral of the story, I wish I had gone for something like it years
ago, and I now have a new found respect for IGBT inverter arc welders
- they make the whole process quite civilised!

Tell me exactly what to buy. Seriously. The welder I bought for £50 in
1976 is beginning to get on my nerves a bit.

Bill

I got one of these and it is the most amazing thing since sliced bread,

https://tinyurl.com/yxe2at3m
it is tiny, weighs almost nothing and welds up to 3.2 electrodes with
ease I was in the electrical game and back in the day of transformers
none of us would have believed it possible what this little inverter
does,dc is easier to weld with.
I also have a bigger MIG with optional stick leads.Could carry it
anywhere, up a pole hanging off your belt if you wished.


What sort of duty cycle OOI?

Cheers, T i m


The link contains a spec which says 60%.


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