UK diy (uk.d-i-y) For the discussion of all topics related to diy (do-it-yourself) in the UK. All levels of experience and proficency are welcome to join in to ask questions or offer solutions.

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  #1   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
 
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Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.

They seem to range in price, from 35 at toolstation to over 75 for
those advertised on TV.

I can only assume they have different power outputs as a reason for the
price differences.

Can anyone recomend a fair price unit that will work. I'd rather spend
money on one that works that on a cheap ones that does sweet FA.

  #4   Report Post  
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Doctor Drivel
 
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Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


wrote in message
ups.com...
I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.

They seem to range in price, from 35 at toolstation to over 75 for
those advertised on TV.

I can only assume they have different power outputs as a reason for the
price differences.

Can anyone recomend a fair price unit that will work. I'd rather spend
money on one that works that on a cheap ones that does sweet FA.


Scalewatcher has a good reputation.


  #7   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Peter Parry
 
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Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On 17 Mar 2006 04:47:26 -0800, "
wrote:

I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.


I suggest you don't.

They seem to range in price, from 35 at toolstation to over 75 for
those advertised on TV.

I can only assume they have different power outputs as a reason for the
price differences.


They have various, mainly cosmetic, differences and varying wildly
inaccurate descriptions of how they are supposed to work. None of
these affect their complete lack of effectiveness.

Can anyone recomend a fair price unit that will work.


Not really as none of them work. If you really want to convince
yourself buy the cheapest which doesn't require installation and
comes with a 12 month "money back" guarantee. Get it from a major
retailer - somewhere like Homebase - and get it in writing that you
can have a full refund when you find it is useless. Make a careful
note of the convoluted terms of the guarantee and mark on the
calendar when you must return it. The marketing of these devices
relies upon people forgetting to claim their money back months after
buying them and finding they don't work.

--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
  #8   Report Post  
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Grimly Curmudgeon
 
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Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember "
saying something like:

I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.

They seem to range in price, from 35 at toolstation to over 75 for
those advertised on TV.

I can only assume they have different power outputs as a reason for the
price differences.

Can anyone recomend a fair price unit that will work. I'd rather spend
money on one that works that on a cheap ones that does sweet FA.


Give me 75 quid and I'll perform a service for you which will do as much
to keep your pipes scale-free as one of those things.

The service? Oh, that consists of doing absolutely **** all.
--

Dave
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Posted to uk.d-i-y
Guy King
 
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Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

The message . com
from " contains these words:

I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.


Why? What /genuine/ evidence do you have that they work?

--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On 17 Mar 2006 04:47:26 -0800, "
wrote:

I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.


No you don't.


They seem to range in price, from 35 at toolstation to over 75 for
those advertised on TV.


I'll do you a really effective one for 80. Would you like my Paypal
account details?


I can only assume they have different power outputs as a reason for the
price differences.


It's purely determined by what the marketers of them think that the
intended audience will pay.

One other tactic is to offer a money back guarantee and to price them
at a point where most people won't bother to return them.



Can anyone recomend a fair price unit that will work. I'd rather spend
money on one that works that on a cheap ones that does sweet FA.


They all do sweet FA, so it doesn't make any difference.

If you are trying to address scaling, then a phosphor dosing system
like a Combimate will do the job.

If you want to also soften the water and save on shampoos and
detergents, then you need an ion exchange water softener.


--

..andy


Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
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  #11   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Alex
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

Guy King wrote:
I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.


Why? What /genuine/ evidence do you have that they work?


While I agree that these devices don't work (my parents had one fitted
some years back), how do the manufacturers then get away with selling them?

Alex
  #12   Report Post  
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Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Grunff" wrote in message
...
wrote:
I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.


No, you really don't.


He does. He said so.

  #13   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Alex" wrote in message
...
Guy King wrote:
I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.


Why? What /genuine/ evidence do you have that they work?


While I agree that these devices don't work (my parents had one fitted
some years back), how do the manufacturers then get away with selling
them?


Many appliance makers recommend them. So for them not working. I have one
and it works.

  #14   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On Fri, 17 Mar 2006 22:19:46 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:


"Alex" wrote in message
...
Guy King wrote:
I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.

Why? What /genuine/ evidence do you have that they work?


While I agree that these devices don't work (my parents had one fitted
some years back), how do the manufacturers then get away with selling
them?


Many appliance makers recommend them. So for them not working. I have one
and it works.



Ah..... so it depends on *who* you are.

Of course. So obvious.


--

..andy

  #15   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Grimly Curmudgeon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember Andy Hall
saying something like:

Many appliance makers recommend them. So for them not working. I have one
and it works.



Ah..... so it depends on *who* you are.

Of course. So obvious.


His elephant scarer works too.
--

Dave


  #16   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Andy Hall" akak Matt wrote in message
...
On Fri, 17 Mar 2006 22:19:46 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:


"Alex" wrote in message
...
Guy King wrote:
I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.

Why? What /genuine/ evidence do you have that they work?

While I agree that these devices don't work (my parents had one fitted
some years back), how do the manufacturers then get away with selling
them?


Many appliance makers recommend them. So for them not working. I have one
and it works.



Ah..... so it depends on *who* you are.


Matt, have you been at the sherry again?

  #17   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Grimly Curmudgeon" wrote in message
...
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember Andy Hall
saying something like:

Many appliance makers recommend them. So for them not working. I have one
and it works.



Ah..... so it depends on *who* you are.

Of course. So obvious.


His elephant scarer works too.


Never fails. The scale just drops off as well.

  #18   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Dave Plowman (News)
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

In article ws.net,
Doctor Drivel wrote:
His elephant scarer works too.


Never fails. The scale just drops off as well.


Elephants don't have scales.

--
*You! Off my planet!

Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #19   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Rob Morley
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

In article
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
In article ws.net,
Doctor Drivel wrote:
His elephant scarer works too.


Never fails. The scale just drops off as well.


Elephants don't have scales.


Told you it was good.
  #20   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Guy King
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

The message
from Alex contains these words:

While I agree that these devices don't work (my parents had one fitted
some years back), how do the manufacturers then get away with selling them?


Because they invent spurious ********.

--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.


  #21   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
The Natural Philosopher
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

Alex wrote:
Guy King wrote:
I need to purchase a electric scale inhibitor.


Why? What /genuine/ evidence do you have that they work?


While I agree that these devices don't work (my parents had one fitted
some years back), how do the manufacturers then get away with selling them?

Alex

How does the labour government get away with doing naff all useful?

Same principle.

You can fool enough of the people enough of the time..
  #22   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
 
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Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?

I guess the word inhibitor rather than preventor is key. It only helps
but does not eliminate.

I've seen demonstrations where water particles run a different way
after going through this type of system. I am trying to prevent water
marks on the shower chome and glass only.

  #24   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?


Completely useless.


I guess the word inhibitor rather than preventor is key. It only helps
but does not eliminate.

I've seen demonstrations where water particles run a different way
after going through this type of system. I am trying to prevent water
marks on the shower chome and glass only.


These will not do that.

The choices are phosphate dosing if you want to address scaling, or
ion exchange water softener if you also want to reduce detergent and
shampoo use.



--

..andy

  #26   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Andy Hall" aka wrote in message
...
On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?


Completely useless.


Matt, what experience of these do youhave, besides guessing?

  #27   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
The Natural Philosopher
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

Andy Hall wrote:
On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?


Completely useless.

I guess the word inhibitor rather than preventor is key. It only helps
but does not eliminate.

I've seen demonstrations where water particles run a different way
after going through this type of system. I am trying to prevent water
marks on the shower chome and glass only.


These will not do that.

The choices are phosphate dosing if you want to address scaling, or
ion exchange water softener if you also want to reduce detergent and
shampoo use.



Even with a softener our shower screen gets a bit cloudy.

Not quite sure why - OK its TONS better than unsoftened, but there is
still something coming out.
  #28   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Richard Perkin
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

Andy Hall wrote in
:

On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?


Completely useless.


This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.

Which is not quite the same as "useless" - more a case of "suck it
and see".

WRc does say that other testers have found the AQAtotal device
efective.

The document at the link above will answer most (?) questions and
will repay careful reading. Whether the cost of the AQAtotal (which I
don't know) would be repaid is a different question...

Find info on the AQAtotal he
http://www.aqatotal.com/index_e.htm

For info: as part of a house renovation project, the plumber doing
the boiler installation for me has installed an in-line permanent
magnet device. I expressed my scepticism that it will work; he claims
it does, and has one himself. I will wait and see - but I'm not
holding my breath.

Hope this helps

--

Richard Perkin
To email me, change the AT in the address below
richard.perkinATmyrealbox.com

It's is not, it isn't ain't, and it's it's, not its, if you mean it
is. If you don't, it's its. Then too, it's hers. It isn't her's.
It isn't our's either. It's ours, and likewise yours and theirs.
-- Oxford University Press, Edpress News
  #29   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On 21 Mar 2006 13:11:14 GMT, Richard Perkin
wrote:

Andy Hall wrote in
:

On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?


Completely useless.


This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.

Which is not quite the same as "useless" - more a case of "suck it
and see".


The document is liberally sprinkled with the words "if", "might",
"maybe"

The WRC reference is worthless because it only relates to whether
conditioners do or don't conform to regulations and is not related to
fitness for purpose.

There is only one PC device that has passed the German DVGW tests and
this is not the typical type of 30-90 device that is sold.

These are useless.


--

..andy

  #30   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:11:11 +0000, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

Andy Hall wrote:
On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?


Completely useless.

I guess the word inhibitor rather than preventor is key. It only helps
but does not eliminate.

I've seen demonstrations where water particles run a different way
after going through this type of system. I am trying to prevent water
marks on the shower chome and glass only.


These will not do that.

The choices are phosphate dosing if you want to address scaling, or
ion exchange water softener if you also want to reduce detergent and
shampoo use.



Even with a softener our shower screen gets a bit cloudy.

Not quite sure why - OK its TONS better than unsoftened, but there is
still something coming out.


I think that this could be salt deposits from the content in shampoo,
because I notice that it does vary according to what has been used.

--

..andy


Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
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  #31   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On 21 Mar 2006 13:11:14 GMT, Richard Perkin
wrote:

Andy Hall wrote in
m:

On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?

Completely useless.


This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.

Which is not quite the same as "useless" - more a case of "suck it
and see".


The document is liberally sprinkled with the words "if", "might",
"maybe"

The WRC reference is worthless because it only relates to whether
conditioners do or don't conform to regulations and is not related to
fitness for purpose.

There is only one PC device that
has passed the German DVGW tests and
this is not the typical type of 30-90
device that is sold.

These are useless.


That is not what the WRC say.

  #32   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Guy King
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

The message
from Richard Perkin contains these words:

This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.


However, it also goes on to say

"At the present time no device can be guaranteed to work
to produce an acceptable benefit, except in very specific
circumstances."

Which to my mind falls far below "Suck it an see" and down in the realms
of snake oil. The firms that do these tests seem quite sensitive to
concerns about being prosecuted by a manufacturer for slating a product.
It's rare for an individual test to show that something is snake-oil.
Think about all the trouble with the Broquet fuel catalyst during the
switch from leaded to unleaded.

--
Skipweasel
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.
  #33   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Andy Hall" aka Matt wrote in message
...
On 21 Mar 2006 13:11:14 GMT, Richard Perkin
wrote:

Andy Hall wrote in
m:

On 21 Mar 2006 04:28:02 -0800, "
wrote:

I assumed they worked because my plumber installed a magnetic one
inline to the new boiler I brought. I thought it was the same
principle. Are you guys all saying that these don't work either ?

Completely useless.


This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.

Which is not quite the same as "useless" - more a case of "suck it
and see".


The document is liberally sprinkled with the words "if", "might",
"maybe"

The WRC reference is worthless because it only relates to whether
conditioners do or don't conform to regulations and is not related to
fitness for purpose.

There is only one PC device that has passed
the German DVGW tests and
this is not the typical type of 30-90 device that is sold.

These are useless.


Matt, so usless it has passed German DVGW-W512 guidelines. Independently
tested in the US by Spectrum Labs, who said, "there was 99% less hardness
scale in the treated chamber than what was detected in the untreated
chamber."

Isn't that amazing! And not a Makita manual in sight.

  #34   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Guy King" wrote in message
...
The message
from Richard Perkin contains these words:

This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.


However, it also goes on to say

"At the present time no device can be guaranteed to work
to produce an acceptable benefit, except in very specific
circumstances."

Which to my mind falls far below
"Suck it an see" and down in the realms
of snake oil. The firms that do these
tests seem quite sensitive to
concerns about being prosecuted by
a manufacturer for slating a product.


The Germans found one that 100% works. It must high grade snake oil

  #35   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:45:07 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:

This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.

Which is not quite the same as "useless" - more a case of "suck it
and see".


The document is liberally sprinkled with the words "if", "might",
"maybe"

The WRC reference is worthless because it only relates to whether
conditioners do or don't conform to regulations and is not related to
fitness for purpose.

There is only one PC device that
has passed the German DVGW tests and
this is not the typical type of 30-90
device that is sold.

These are useless.


That is not what the WRC say.


There are a sufficient number of caveats, exceptions, maybes, and
"might work" but circumstances undefined and undefinable, that they
are doing nothing more than being kind.

As I said. Useless.


--

..andy


Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
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  #36   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 14:09:36 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:


Matt, so usless it has passed German DVGW-W512 guidelines. Independently
tested in the US by Spectrum Labs, who said, "there was 99% less hardness
scale in the treated chamber than what was detected in the untreated
chamber."


One product which is nothing like the 30 - 90 con trick rubbish that
you claim works.


--

..andy


Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
----------------------------------------------------------
** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.usenet.com
  #37   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 13:45:07 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:

This document:
http://www.southernwater.co.uk/pdfs/.../drinkWaterQua
lity/SoftenersWRCnote.pdf
based on research from WRc (if I remember correctly, the now-
privatised Water Research Centre labs) that physical conditioning
devices do *indeed* work, but that the scale-reducing effect cannot
be guaranteed.

Which is not quite the same as "useless" - more a case of "suck it
and see".


The document is liberally sprinkled with the words "if", "might",
"maybe"

The WRC reference is worthless because it only relates to whether
conditioners do or don't conform to regulations and is not related to
fitness for purpose.

There is only one PC device that
has passed the German DVGW tests and
this is not the typical type of 30-90
device that is sold.

These are useless.


That is not what the WRC say.


There are a sufficient number of caveats, exceptions, maybes, and
"might work" but circumstances undefined and undefinable, that they
are doing nothing more than being kind.

As I said. Useless.


Assertion is not proof.

  #38   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Doctor Drivel
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 14:09:36 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:


Matt, so usless it has passed German DVGW-W512 guidelines. Independently
tested in the US by Spectrum Labs, who said, "there was 99% less hardness
scale in the treated chamber than what was detected in the untreated
chamber."


One product which is nothing like the 30 - 90 con trick rubbish that
you claim works.


Mine is made by Aqua-Dial, who make many type of softeners, and it works.

  #39   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 14:19:33 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:



There are a sufficient number of caveats, exceptions, maybes, and
"might work" but circumstances undefined and undefinable, that they
are doing nothing more than being kind.

As I said. Useless.


Assertion is not proof.


That's the whole trouble. The manufacturers assert and have no proof.


--

..andy

  #40   Report Post  
Posted to uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Advice on which electric scale inhibitor to use.

On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 14:20:37 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:


"Andy Hall" wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 21 Mar 2006 14:09:36 -0000, "Doctor Drivel"
wrote:


Matt, so usless it has passed German DVGW-W512 guidelines. Independently
tested in the US by Spectrum Labs, who said, "there was 99% less hardness
scale in the treated chamber than what was detected in the untreated
chamber."


One product which is nothing like the 30 - 90 con trick rubbish that
you claim works.


Mine is made by Aqua-Dial, who make many type of softeners, and it works.



Lovely.


--

..andy

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