Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Old May 1st 15, 04:40 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

On Fri, 01 May 2015 19:43:58 +0800, RodK wrote:

On 01-May-15 10:41 AM, whit3rd wrote:
On Thursday, April 30, 2015 at 3:25:46 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Not exactly metalworking. I needed to make a replacement glass piece
...for proper focusing. I used a 1mm glass slide, the type made
for microscopes. The piece needed to be 8 x 9 mm. I managed to get one
and then discovered I had scratched it. So I tried again and was
rewarded with a scratch free piece. I was surprised how hard it was to
cut this glass, for it to break where I wanted it to


The usual scheme, is to rotate a brass or copper cylinder tool, painted with
abrasive slurry, and trepan out a disk. A kind of hotmelt glue (jeweler's wax,
or dop adhesive) holds the work. It's slow, because the glass will crack
if you allow the cut to heat it too much.
I've done it with a tinning swab, a few drops of glycerine, and SiC grit.



Out of interest why brass or copper? Does the abrasive embed in it?

Yes, the abrasive does imbed. I make laps for carbide from brass.
After the lap is turned to size I press diamond dust into the brass.
It really works quite well. For the saw I used to make a smaller
achromat I put the abrasive on a piece of hardened steel and pushed
(hard) the cutting edge of the saw into the diamond.
Eric

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Old May 1st 15, 08:26 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

On Fri, 01 May 2015 08:33:36 -0700, wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 21:42:45 -0400, Ed Huntress
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 18:16:06 -0700,
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 15:57:05 -0700 (PDT), Gerry
wrote:

On Thursday, April 30, 2015 at 5:25:46 PM UTC-5, wrote:
Not exactly metalworking. I needed to make a replacement glass piece
for a camera because I removed the IR/UV filter and the space needed
filling for proper focusing. I used a 1mm glass slide, the type made
for microscopes. The piece needed to be 8 x 9 mm. I mamaged to get one
and then discovered I had scratched it. So I tried again and was
rewarded with a scratch free piece. I was surprised how hard it was to
cut this glass, for it to break where I wanted it to, and finally
figured out how to score it properly. I hope I never need to do this
again.
Eric

Years ago I did lapidary work. While most everything was done with stone I used to play with glass sometimes. I was able to cut glass with a diamond saw, grind to shape using grinding and sanding wheels with water drip to keep things cool. The glass was mounted to dop sticks using what was called dop wax which was almost like old style sealing wax used with stamps for letters and such. Maybe you can find someone close by that is into lapidary work for help? A designing jeweler may point you in the right direction. I'd bet that your local glass shop has wet belt sanders with different grit belts for finishing glass edges. Maybe they would let you use their belt sanders for your project?
Greetings Gerry,
I have done lapidary work and even have the stuff still to do it. My
stone saw is just not set up to cut stuff so small and the glass is
more brittle than the stones I have cut in the past. I did finish off
the piece by using one of my diamond wheels on my slow speed carbide
grinding/lapping machine. I was actually surprised at how fragile the
glass was. I have cut glass tiles in the past year with one of my
diamond cutting discs cooled and lubricated with water and had no
trouble. But the little pieces I just did were much more prone to
chipping and cracking than the tiles and the diamond cutting disc
caused too much edge chipping, even when run quite slow.
Thanks,
Eric


Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention that there are fused-quartz slides, too.
You generally can't tell the difference by looking at them and you'd
know it if you bought them in a package. They have very high UV
transmittance but I have no idea how they cut.

I wish they were quartz because of the toughness and UV transmission.
The filter I removed was a two piece affair. At first I wondered why
two pieces of glass were cemented together and I thought maybe it was
for strength. But I think it is because the clear piece of glass is to
filter out UV. This would be good because CCD sensors also see into
the UV spectrum a ways and I would like to get some pictures of
reflected UV from flowers and such. Tonight I will be installing the
glass and doing any adjusting of the sensor location that may need to
be done. Tomorrow night I hope it will all be back tohether so I can
try it out at a bonfire.
Eric


Good luck. I never priced the quartz slides before but I just looked
them up -- which I should have done before posting. Yipes, they're
expensive.

I see that they're also said to be available in borosilicate glass
(the stuff old Pyrex was made from -- today, it's tempered soda lime
glass), but I didn't look for a supplier. Borosilicate is still
another kettle of fish.

--
Ed Huntress
  #13   Report Post  
Old May 1st 15, 08:46 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 258
Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

On 01/05/15 20:26, Ed Huntress wrote:
On Fri, 01 May 2015 08:33:36 -0700, wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 21:42:45 -0400, Ed Huntress
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 18:16:06 -0700,
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 15:57:05 -0700 (PDT), Gerry
wrote:

On Thursday, April 30, 2015 at 5:25:46 PM UTC-5, wrote:
Not exactly metalworking. I needed to make a replacement glass piece
for a camera because I removed the IR/UV filter and the space needed
filling for proper focusing. I used a 1mm glass slide, the type made
for microscopes. The piece needed to be 8 x 9 mm. I mamaged to get one
and then discovered I had scratched it. So I tried again and was
rewarded with a scratch free piece. I was surprised how hard it was to
cut this glass, for it to break where I wanted it to, and finally
figured out how to score it properly. I hope I never need to do this
again.
Eric
Years ago I did lapidary work. While most everything was done with stone I used to play with glass sometimes. I was able to cut glass with a diamond saw, grind to shape using grinding and sanding wheels with water drip to keep things cool. The glass was mounted to dop sticks using what was called dop wax which was almost like old style sealing wax used with stamps for letters and such. Maybe you can find someone close by that is into lapidary work for help? A designing jeweler may point you in the right direction. I'd bet that your local glass shop has wet belt sanders with different grit belts for finishing glass edges. Maybe they would let you use their belt sanders for your project?
Greetings Gerry,
I have done lapidary work and even have the stuff still to do it. My
stone saw is just not set up to cut stuff so small and the glass is
more brittle than the stones I have cut in the past. I did finish off
the piece by using one of my diamond wheels on my slow speed carbide
grinding/lapping machine. I was actually surprised at how fragile the
glass was. I have cut glass tiles in the past year with one of my
diamond cutting discs cooled and lubricated with water and had no
trouble. But the little pieces I just did were much more prone to
chipping and cracking than the tiles and the diamond cutting disc
caused too much edge chipping, even when run quite slow.
Thanks,
Eric
Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention that there are fused-quartz slides, too.
You generally can't tell the difference by looking at them and you'd
know it if you bought them in a package. They have very high UV
transmittance but I have no idea how they cut.

I wish they were quartz because of the toughness and UV transmission.
The filter I removed was a two piece affair. At first I wondered why
two pieces of glass were cemented together and I thought maybe it was
for strength. But I think it is because the clear piece of glass is to
filter out UV. This would be good because CCD sensors also see into
the UV spectrum a ways and I would like to get some pictures of
reflected UV from flowers and such. Tonight I will be installing the
glass and doing any adjusting of the sensor location that may need to
be done. Tomorrow night I hope it will all be back tohether so I can
try it out at a bonfire.
Eric

Good luck. I never priced the quartz slides before but I just looked
them up -- which I should have done before posting. Yipes, they're
expensive.

I see that they're also said to be available in borosilicate glass
(the stuff old Pyrex was made from -- today, it's tempered soda lime
glass), but I didn't look for a supplier. Borosilicate is still
another kettle of fish.

I posted this before, apparently Pyrex is still made with borosilicate
in Europe, it seems the US made stuff is tempered soda lime glass, I
guess to reduce the price. Certainly all the Pyrex I have here in the UK
is clear and doesn't have the green cast often seen in soda lime from
iron and when dropped doesn't break like a tempered glass DAMHIK.
  #14   Report Post  
Old May 1st 15, 08:55 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 12,540
Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

On Fri, 01 May 2015 20:46:59 +0100, David Billington
wrote:

On 01/05/15 20:26, Ed Huntress wrote:
On Fri, 01 May 2015 08:33:36 -0700, wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 21:42:45 -0400, Ed Huntress
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 18:16:06 -0700,
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 15:57:05 -0700 (PDT), Gerry
wrote:

On Thursday, April 30, 2015 at 5:25:46 PM UTC-5, wrote:
Not exactly metalworking. I needed to make a replacement glass piece
for a camera because I removed the IR/UV filter and the space needed
filling for proper focusing. I used a 1mm glass slide, the type made
for microscopes. The piece needed to be 8 x 9 mm. I mamaged to get one
and then discovered I had scratched it. So I tried again and was
rewarded with a scratch free piece. I was surprised how hard it was to
cut this glass, for it to break where I wanted it to, and finally
figured out how to score it properly. I hope I never need to do this
again.
Eric
Years ago I did lapidary work. While most everything was done with stone I used to play with glass sometimes. I was able to cut glass with a diamond saw, grind to shape using grinding and sanding wheels with water drip to keep things cool. The glass was mounted to dop sticks using what was called dop wax which was almost like old style sealing wax used with stamps for letters and such. Maybe you can find someone close by that is into lapidary work for help? A designing jeweler may point you in the right direction. I'd bet that your local glass shop has wet belt sanders with different grit belts for finishing glass edges. Maybe they would let you use their belt sanders for your project?
Greetings Gerry,
I have done lapidary work and even have the stuff still to do it. My
stone saw is just not set up to cut stuff so small and the glass is
more brittle than the stones I have cut in the past. I did finish off
the piece by using one of my diamond wheels on my slow speed carbide
grinding/lapping machine. I was actually surprised at how fragile the
glass was. I have cut glass tiles in the past year with one of my
diamond cutting discs cooled and lubricated with water and had no
trouble. But the little pieces I just did were much more prone to
chipping and cracking than the tiles and the diamond cutting disc
caused too much edge chipping, even when run quite slow.
Thanks,
Eric
Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention that there are fused-quartz slides, too.
You generally can't tell the difference by looking at them and you'd
know it if you bought them in a package. They have very high UV
transmittance but I have no idea how they cut.
I wish they were quartz because of the toughness and UV transmission.
The filter I removed was a two piece affair. At first I wondered why
two pieces of glass were cemented together and I thought maybe it was
for strength. But I think it is because the clear piece of glass is to
filter out UV. This would be good because CCD sensors also see into
the UV spectrum a ways and I would like to get some pictures of
reflected UV from flowers and such. Tonight I will be installing the
glass and doing any adjusting of the sensor location that may need to
be done. Tomorrow night I hope it will all be back tohether so I can
try it out at a bonfire.
Eric

Good luck. I never priced the quartz slides before but I just looked
them up -- which I should have done before posting. Yipes, they're
expensive.

I see that they're also said to be available in borosilicate glass
(the stuff old Pyrex was made from -- today, it's tempered soda lime
glass), but I didn't look for a supplier. Borosilicate is still
another kettle of fish.

I posted this before, apparently Pyrex is still made with borosilicate
in Europe, it seems the US made stuff is tempered soda lime glass, I
guess to reduce the price.


Right. We can get the borosilicate cookware, but my recollection is
that it's imported from Europe. The Pyrex cookware usually sold in the
US is now tempered soda lime glass.

Certainly all the Pyrex I have here in the UK
is clear and doesn't have the green cast often seen in soda lime from
iron and when dropped doesn't break like a tempered glass DAMHIK.


Iggy had a bad experience with a relatively new Pyrex baking dish. It
shattered in the oven. I'm hanging on to my old stuff, some of which
dates back to the '60s.

--
Ed Huntress
  #15   Report Post  
Old May 2nd 15, 03:59 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Oct 2007
Posts: 364
Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

In article , Ed Huntress
wrote:

On Fri, 01 May 2015 20:46:59 +0100, David Billington
wrote:

On 01/05/15 20:26, Ed Huntress wrote:
On Fri, 01 May 2015 08:33:36 -0700, wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 21:42:45 -0400, Ed Huntress
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 18:16:06 -0700,
wrote:

On Thu, 30 Apr 2015 15:57:05 -0700 (PDT), Gerry
wrote:

On Thursday, April 30, 2015 at 5:25:46 PM UTC-5,
wrote:
Not exactly metalworking. I needed to make a replacement glass piece
for a camera because I removed the IR/UV filter and the space needed
filling for proper focusing. I used a 1mm glass slide, the type made
for microscopes. The piece needed to be 8 x 9 mm. I mamaged to get one
and then discovered I had scratched it. So I tried again and was
rewarded with a scratch free piece. I was surprised how hard it was to
cut this glass, for it to break where I wanted it to, and finally
figured out how to score it properly. I hope I never need to do this
again.
Eric
Years ago I did lapidary work. While most everything was done with
stone I used to play with glass sometimes. I was able to cut glass
with a diamond saw, grind to shape using grinding and sanding wheels
with water drip to keep things cool. The glass was mounted to dop
sticks using what was called dop wax which was almost like old style
sealing wax used with stamps for letters and such. Maybe you can find
someone close by that is into lapidary work for help? A designing
jeweler may point you in the right direction. I'd bet that your local
glass shop has wet belt sanders with different grit belts for
finishing glass edges. Maybe they would let you use their belt sanders
for your project?
Greetings Gerry,
I have done lapidary work and even have the stuff still to do it. My
stone saw is just not set up to cut stuff so small and the glass is
more brittle than the stones I have cut in the past. I did finish off
the piece by using one of my diamond wheels on my slow speed carbide
grinding/lapping machine. I was actually surprised at how fragile the
glass was. I have cut glass tiles in the past year with one of my
diamond cutting discs cooled and lubricated with water and had no
trouble. But the little pieces I just did were much more prone to
chipping and cracking than the tiles and the diamond cutting disc
caused too much edge chipping, even when run quite slow.
Thanks,
Eric
Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention that there are fused-quartz slides, too.
You generally can't tell the difference by looking at them and you'd
know it if you bought them in a package. They have very high UV
transmittance but I have no idea how they cut.
I wish they were quartz because of the toughness and UV transmission.
The filter I removed was a two piece affair. At first I wondered why
two pieces of glass were cemented together and I thought maybe it was
for strength. But I think it is because the clear piece of glass is to
filter out UV. This would be good because CCD sensors also see into
the UV spectrum a ways and I would like to get some pictures of
reflected UV from flowers and such. Tonight I will be installing the
glass and doing any adjusting of the sensor location that may need to
be done. Tomorrow night I hope it will all be back tohether so I can
try it out at a bonfire.
Eric
Good luck. I never priced the quartz slides before but I just looked
them up -- which I should have done before posting. Yipes, they're
expensive.

I see that they're also said to be available in borosilicate glass
(the stuff old Pyrex was made from -- today, it's tempered soda lime
glass), but I didn't look for a supplier. Borosilicate is still
another kettle of fish.

I posted this before, apparently Pyrex is still made with borosilicate
in Europe, it seems the US made stuff is tempered soda lime glass, I
guess to reduce the price.


Right. We can get the borosilicate cookware, but my recollection is
that it's imported from Europe. The Pyrex cookware usually sold in the
US is now tempered soda lime glass.


Yes. The "Pyrex" brand fell into the wrong hands after Corning nearly
died when the dot-com bubble burst, and was selling off "non-core"
businesses.

The new company is busily destroying the Pyrex brand.


Certainly all the Pyrex I have here in the UK
is clear and doesn't have the green cast often seen in soda lime from
iron and when dropped doesn't break like a tempered glass DAMHIK.


Iggy had a bad experience with a relatively new Pyrex baking dish. It
shattered in the oven. I'm hanging on to my old stuff, some of which
dates back to the '60s.


Iggy is not alone. Lots of horror stories on the web now.

There are now people selling borosilicate glassware, by that name,

And I'm hanging onto my old stuff too.

Joe Gwinn


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Old June 11th 15, 04:11 AM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

On 2015-06-10, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Fri, 01 May 2015 08:33:36 -0700, wrote:

[Snip]

I wish they were quartz because of the toughness and UV transmission.
The filter I removed was a two piece affair. At first I wondered why


[ ... ]

Perhaps a source of quarts flats would from quartz crystals used in
electronic devices. e.g. RF oscillators, computer clock control and
such. I think CCD sensors are more sensitive to IR than UV. In any
case UV doesn't transmit well through regular glass lens.


The problem with the quartz used in frequency-determining
crystals is that they are ground to thickness, and thus have a frosted
look, not a nice flat surface to allow it to act as a window/filter for
images. The older ones are mounted between two metal plates which make
contact only at the corners, with a spring applying pressure to the
upper plate.

Later ones have metalized surfaces on each side, with a
spring-formed wire soldered to the center of each. There, even if the
surface were flat enough for optical image transmission, you would have
to dissolve the metal coating with an acid which would attack the metal
without attacking the quartz.

And -- the largest that I have ever seen was about 1/2" square,
which is not likely to be large enough for the sensor in question.
(Well ... I've never opened the two inch long can for a 1 KHz crystal
which I have, but it still would not be wide enough, even if it were
long enough.

Good Luck,
DoN.

--
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(too) near Washington D.C. |
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--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
  #19   Report Post  
Old June 11th 15, 02:10 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 69
Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

May not be large enough but how about the quartz windows on old UV eraseable
EPROMs? Have to dig it out of the epoxy, but I'm sure lots of shops and
tinkerers have some stuck away in a junk drawer.

-----
Regards,
Carl Ijames
wrote in message ...

On 11 Jun 2015 03:11:05 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
wrote:

On 2015-06-10, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Fri, 01 May 2015 08:33:36 -0700, wrote:

[Snip]

I wish they were quartz because of the toughness and UV transmission.
The filter I removed was a two piece affair. At first I wondered why


[ ... ]

Perhaps a source of quarts flats would from quartz crystals used in
electronic devices. e.g. RF oscillators, computer clock control and
such. I think CCD sensors are more sensitive to IR than UV. In any
case UV doesn't transmit well through regular glass lens.


If you want optical quality windows go to newport.com They sell
parallel surface windows made from all known optical materials.
There are many other scientific optics sources on the Internet.


  #20   Report Post  
Old June 11th 15, 04:29 PM posted to rec.crafts.metalworking
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Posts: 2,058
Default Cutting thin tiny glass parts

On Thu, 11 Jun 2015 09:10:47 -0400, "Carl Ijames"
wrote:

May not be large enough but how about the quartz windows on old UV eraseable
EPROMs? Have to dig it out of the epoxy, but I'm sure lots of shops and
tinkerers have some stuck away in a junk drawer.

-----
Regards,
Carl Ijames
wrote in message ...

On 11 Jun 2015 03:11:05 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"
wrote:

On 2015-06-10, Gray_Wolf wrote:
On Fri, 01 May 2015 08:33:36 -0700, wrote:

[Snip]

I wish they were quartz because of the toughness and UV transmission.
The filter I removed was a two piece affair. At first I wondered why


[ ... ]

Perhaps a source of quarts flats would from quartz crystals used in
electronic devices. e.g. RF oscillators, computer clock control and
such. I think CCD sensors are more sensitive to IR than UV. In any
case UV doesn't transmit well through regular glass lens.


If you want optical quality windows go to newport.com They sell
parallel surface windows made from all known optical materials.
There are many other scientific optics sources on the Internet.

Greetings Carl,
I didn't know the windows on EPROMs were quartz but it makes sense.
The ones I have though are too small. Fortunately the glass lenses in
my camera let through a pretty significant amount of near UV. Just
like window glass. Hence the internal two piece filter between the
lens and sensor in my camera. This near UV passing through normal
camera lenses is also the reason for the UV/Haze camera filters.
Eric


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