Metalworking (rec.crafts.metalworking) Discuss various aspects of working with metal, such as machining, welding, metal joining, screwing, casting, hardening/tempering, blacksmithing/forging, spinning and hammer work, sheet metal work.

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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank


I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/
  #2   Report Post  
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LowEnergyParticle
 
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Default A little metal crank

Beautiful job, Don!

Whose nickle-plating process did you use, Caswell's? It came out
looking great!

Dave

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Ken Sterling
 
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Default A little metal crank


I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/

Don....
Just for *once* I'd like to see you make something really CRAPPY
looking and almost totally unusable.... G
Ken.

  #4   Report Post  
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Bugs
 
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Default A little metal crank

Nice job! Now I need to do exactly the same thing for mine. It's been
stuck together with a screw and epoxy for 30+ years.
Bugs

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On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 11:46:39 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Ken
Sterling (Ken Sterling) quickly quoth:


I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/

Don....
Just for *once* I'd like to see you make something really CRAPPY
looking and almost totally unusable.... G


Ken, you should take deep satisfaction in the knowledge that he
misspelled "nickel" on that page. Enjoy!


--
- Tom Mix Died For Your Sins -
--------------------------
http://diversify.com Comprehensive, Sin-free Website Development


  #6   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On 3 Feb 2006 00:36:29 -0800, "LowEnergyParticle"
wrote:

Beautiful job, Don!

Whose nickle-plating process did you use, Caswell's? It came out
looking great!

Dave


Yes, Caswell's stuff. Electroplated, not electroless.
  #7   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 11:46:39 GMT, Ken Sterling (Ken Sterling) wrote:


I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/

Don....
Just for *once* I'd like to see you make something really CRAPPY
looking and almost totally unusable.... G
Ken.


Welllll....there are two sources of metal in my shop, the rawstock
rack and the aw**** box.... G
  #8   Report Post  
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T.Alan Kraus
 
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Default A little metal crank

Don Foreman wrote:
I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/


Beautiful work! how did you shape the handle?

T.Alan
  #9   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 17:14:12 GMT, Ignoramus13782
wrote:

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 00:41:52 -0600, Don Foreman wrote:

I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/


Don, very nice. How did you nickel plate them?

i

I used Caswell's nickel-plating chemicals and nickel anode at 50 mA
per square inch of workpiece. The stuff looks a bit pricey, but it
seems to last forever. I've been using this same batch for at least
7 years.
  #10   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 09:22:19 -0800, "T.Alan Kraus"
wrote:

Don Foreman wrote:
I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/


Beautiful work! how did you shape the handle?

T.Alan


Freehand, on the lathe. Turned a little of it, did the rest with file
and strip abrasive paper. It may sound tedious but in fact it only
takes a few minutes, particularly with brass.

Shoulda made it bigger, oh well.


  #11   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 14:02:24 -0600, Don Foreman
wrote:

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 09:22:19 -0800, "T.Alan Kraus"
wrote:

Don Foreman wrote:
I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/


Beautiful work! how did you shape the handle?

T.Alan


Freehand, on the lathe. Turned a little of it, did the rest with file
and strip abrasive paper. It may sound tedious but in fact it only
takes a few minutes, particularly with brass.

Shoulda made it bigger, oh well.


I wasn't quite clear here. The handle was made in two parts. One part
is the ball and stem that joins the hub. I made the balls on a mill
with a boring head and tilted indexing head. Then I drilled the
little ball .312 x about .200 deep (2-flute end mill, flat bottomed
hole), made the little perpendicular handle freehand, and
silverbrazed a little turned stud on the end of the handle into the
hole in the ball.

Lesson learned: clamp lightly before brazing. (I just used gravity)
The air in the hole must have expanded and pushed it out a bit before
the brazing alloy froze. That's why the fillet isn't perfectly
smooth. I didn't have that problem with the other two joints perhaps
because they didn't fit as snugly or there was a route for trapped
air (or steam from flux) to escape.

BTW, re recent discussions of propane vs O/A for silverbrazing: The
two joints on opposite sides of the 3/4" dia hub were made with the
same brazing material (Easy-Flo 45) at different times. The
concentrated heat of O/A allowed me to have the second joint made
before the other side of the hub got hot enough to soften the previous
joint. Can't do that with propane, gotta use different brazing
materials of different melting points.
  #12   Report Post  
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jim rozen
 
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Default A little metal crank

In article , Don Foreman says...

Lesson learned: clamp lightly before brazing. (I just used gravity)
The air in the hole must have expanded and pushed it out a bit before
the brazing alloy froze. That's why the fillet isn't perfectly
smooth. I didn't have that problem with the other two joints perhaps
because they didn't fit as snugly or there was a route for trapped
air (or steam from flux) to escape.


Even if the parts have generous clearance, the flux will often flow
in and seal the piston, so it *still* self-disassembles!

Jim


--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
  #13   Report Post  
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Mike
 
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Default A little metal crank

Very Nice! It always amazes me of the talent on this site. Good Job.



  #14   Report Post  
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Tom Gardner
 
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Default A little metal crank

Ok, I admit that when I saw the header I was wondering WHO you were writing
about...just the way my mind works. So, disapointedly, I opened the link.

Well, what a nice piece of true art! I was probably a joy to do, wasn't
it?:



"Don Foreman" wrote in message
...

I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/



  #15   Report Post  
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Jerry Martes
 
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Default A little metal crank


"Mike" wrote in message
...
Very Nice! It always amazes me of the talent on this site. Good Job.


It is even more interesting when you consider his talent for design and
analysis of electronics. Everything he does is better than excellant.

Jerry




  #16   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Sat, 04 Feb 2006 04:26:17 GMT, "Tom Gardner"
wrote:

Ok, I admit that when I saw the header I was wondering WHO you were writing
about...just the way my mind works. So, disapointedly, I opened the link.

Well, what a nice piece of true art! I was probably a joy to do, wasn't
it?:


It's fun for sure when something turns out OK. Maybe it's more fun
because they don't always turn out well so it's sweet when they do.

Every time I use the buffer I think of the creativity and
perceptiveness that children have before it's "educated" out of
them if parents allow that to happen. A little neighbor girl,
about 4, insatiably curious and bright as a new dime, wandered into
my shop on a summer day when all the doors were open. Ally knew the
rules he gotta mind Don or ya can't come in. I get nothing
done when Ally is here because I don't dare take my eye off of her
for a second. I don't mind, for a little while anyway. She's
curious and rather bold for a tyke. I like that about her. She does
mind cheerfully and well, but if nobody told her specifically not to
push this button or that......

She wondered what that green machine did. So I gave her a face
shield to hold (too big for her to wear), positioned her and myself
safely (buffers have a way of grabbing and throwing), and showed her
what it does. Then I pointed to the buttons. "See, the red button
makes it stop. The letters on it say O-F-F because it turns the
machine off, makes it stop. You know that red lights mean stop,
right?" She nodded vigorously. "What do you suppose the letters
on the green button say, Ally?" She hit me with her 300-watt grin
and said, without an instant of hesitation, "SHINEY!"

Bingo for Ally! Made me wanna re-label the green button.



  #17   Report Post  
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Gary Wooding
 
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Default A little metal crank

Don Foreman wrote:
On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 14:02:24 -0600, Don Foreman
wrote:

snip....

BTW, re recent discussions of propane vs O/A for silverbrazing: The
two joints on opposite sides of the 3/4" dia hub were made with the
same brazing material (Easy-Flo 45) at different times. The
concentrated heat of O/A allowed me to have the second joint made
before the other side of the hub got hot enough to soften the previous
joint. Can't do that with propane, gotta use different brazing
materials of different melting points.


I beg to differ. Hard soldering (silverbrazing) is a primary process in
the manufacture of handmade jewellery; something I've been doing for
over 40 years. I frequently need to solder _very_ close to an existing
joint (a few millimetres) and have observed that the new solder melts
before the old stuff, even though its in the same propane flame. The
difference is not great but its certainly there. The process of melting
the solder changes seems to change its characteristics and raise its
melting point. I use this property a great deal and seldom use different
grades of solder.

--
Regards, Gary Wooding
(To reply by email, change feet to foot in my address)
  #18   Report Post  
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T.Alan Kraus
 
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Default A little metal crank


Don Foreman wrote:


Lesson learned: clamp lightly before brazing. (I just used gravity)
The air in the hole must have expanded and pushed it out a bit before
the brazing alloy froze.


I had a scary experience, years ago, silver brazing a snug fitting stud
into a blind hole drilled into a piece of stainless. I had put water
soluble flux into the hole, pressed the stud into it and was heating it
up to make the braze flow. The stud flew out of the stainless work held
in a vice with a bang, past my head and embedded itself in a ceiling
beam. Now I always drill a breathing/venting hole when possible.

cheers
T.Alan
  #19   Report Post  
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Andy Dingley
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 13:59:46 -0600, Don Foreman
wrote:

I used Caswell's nickel-plating chemicals and nickel anode at 50 mA
per square inch of workpiece. The stuff looks a bit pricey, but it
seems to last forever. I've been using this same batch for at least
7 years.


Have you ever used their electroless nickel ? How would you rate one
over the other (if you have) ?

  #20   Report Post  
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Tom Gardner
 
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Default A little metal crank

When I was five, my mom died and my older sisters were in charge 'till dad
got home from work. If I was "Acting-up" the sisters would call dad at the
shop and he would have to come home and get me. On the way back to work, he
would stop at the hobby shop and buy a plastic model for me to build to keep
me busy at the shop while he got some work done. (Gee, anytime I wanted a
new model AND go play at the shop...sisters never got that) When I was done
with the model, I would wander the shop and all the employees would keep an
eye on me. The best part was Mary Sitzenstock would let me push the start
button on the 385 brush machine. OHMYGOD...What a thrill to see this
massive, noisy monstrosity jump to life and create something! I was HOOKED!
Mary retired last year after over sixty years with us...she started when she
was fourteen working for my grandfather. I scrapped the 385 machine two
years ago and replaced it with a new machine, built in 1968. The machine
company still makes that model so parts are easy to get. The old one had to
have everything hand carved and there were some seriously intricate *******
parts to make.

I'm going to re-label ALL my start buttons with "$$$".

Thanks for making me remember that!!!




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Tom Gardner
 
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Default A little metal crank

When I was five, my mom died and my older sisters were in charge 'till dad
got home from work. If I was "Acting-up" the sisters would call dad at the
shop and he would have to come home and get me. On the way back to work, he
would stop at the hobby shop and buy a plastic model for me to build to keep
me busy at the shop while he got some work done. (Gee, anytime I wanted a
new model AND go play at the shop...sisters never got that) When I was done
with the model, I would wander the shop and all the employees would keep an
eye on me. The best part was Mary Sitzenstock would let me push the start
button on the 385 brush machine. OHMYGOD...What a thrill to see this
massive, noisy monstrosity jump to life and create something! I was HOOKED!
Mary retired last year after over sixty years with us...she started when she
was fourteen working for my grandfather. I scrapped the 385 machine two
years ago and replaced it with a new machine, built in 1968. The machine
company still makes that model so parts are easy to get. The old one had to
have everything hand carved and there were some seriously intricate *******
parts to make.

I'm going to re-label ALL my start buttons with "$$$".

Thanks for making me remember that!!!



  #22   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Sat, 04 Feb 2006 14:53:00 +0000, Andy Dingley
wrote:

On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 13:59:46 -0600, Don Foreman
wrote:

I used Caswell's nickel-plating chemicals and nickel anode at 50 mA
per square inch of workpiece. The stuff looks a bit pricey, but it
seems to last forever. I've been using this same batch for at least
7 years.


Have you ever used their electroless nickel ? How would you rate one
over the other (if you have) ?


Electroless nickel is neat because plating occurs everywhere, even
down in the roots of internal threads. There are no "shadows".

I have had intermittent results with it on brass. Sometimes it
works, sometimes it doesnt. It may depend on how much zinc
the brass contains.

It has to be heated to 195F to work, which can take a while.

It must eventually be replenished or replaced as the nickle gets used
up. Regular nickle doesn't need replenishment because it uses a
nickel anode.
  #23   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On Sat, 04 Feb 2006 07:35:05 +0000, Gary Wooding
wrote:

Don Foreman wrote:
On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 14:02:24 -0600, Don Foreman
wrote:

snip....

BTW, re recent discussions of propane vs O/A for silverbrazing: The
two joints on opposite sides of the 3/4" dia hub were made with the
same brazing material (Easy-Flo 45) at different times. The
concentrated heat of O/A allowed me to have the second joint made
before the other side of the hub got hot enough to soften the previous
joint. Can't do that with propane, gotta use different brazing
materials of different melting points.


I beg to differ. Hard soldering (silverbrazing) is a primary process in
the manufacture of handmade jewellery; something I've been doing for
over 40 years. I frequently need to solder _very_ close to an existing
joint (a few millimetres) and have observed that the new solder melts
before the old stuff, even though its in the same propane flame. The
difference is not great but its certainly there. The process of melting
the solder changes seems to change its characteristics and raise its
melting point. I use this property a great deal and seldom use different
grades of solder.


And this on highly conductive metals like silver and gold. Man,
that's what I call heat control! I'll bet 40 years of experience
doesn't hurt a bit.
  #24   Report Post  
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Too_Many_Tools
 
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Default A little metal crank

"Every time I use the buffer I think of the creativity and
perceptiveness that children have before it's "educated" out of
them if parents allow that to happen. A little neighbor girl,
about 4, insatiably curious and bright as a new dime, wandered into
my shop on a summer day when all the doors were open. Ally knew the
rules he gotta mind Don or ya can't come in. I get nothing
done when Ally is here because I don't dare take my eye off of her
for a second. I don't mind, for a little while anyway. She's
curious and rather bold for a tyke. I like that about her. She does
mind cheerfully and well, but if nobody told her specifically not to
push this button or that......
She wondered what that green machine did. So I gave her a face
shield to hold (too big for her to wear), positioned her and myself
safely (buffers have a way of grabbing and throwing), and showed her
what it does. Then I pointed to the buttons. "See, the red button
makes it stop. The letters on it say O-F-F because it turns the
machine off, makes it stop. You know that red lights mean stop,
right?" She nodded vigorously. "What do you suppose the letters
on the green button say, Ally?" She hit me with her 300-watt grin
and said, without an instant of hesitation, "SHINEY!"
Bingo for Ally! Made me wanna re-label the green button. "

Don, your neighbors are lucky to have someone like you.

Never underestimate the positive influence moments like those have on a
young child.

TMT

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Too_Many_Tools
 
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Default A little metal crank

Don,

When you get the time, could you post a picture of your plating setup?

One of my future projects is to build a mobile plating setup with tank,
power supply, heater and such. I am looking for ideas to include in the
setup.

Thanks

TMT



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David Seidel
 
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Default A little metal crank

Awesome work Don.
You are the Master!
I saved that whole post so if I need to do something similar, I'll have some
idea where to start!
Thanks,
David
Someone got a nice lathe.


"Don Foreman" wrote in message
...

I made a little metal crank to replace a broken one on a lathe.

http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/crank/



  #27   Report Post  
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Bob Engelhardt
 
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Default A little metal crank

Gary Wooding wrote:
.... The process of melting
the solder changes seems to change its characteristics and raise its
melting point. ...


Having just read Tubal Cain's "Soldering and Brazing", I can relate
something that I learned there. When brazing is done (soldering, too),
the filler metal mixes with the base metal to create an alloy. This
alloy can (generally does?) have a higher melting point than the filler.
This is commonly experienced when unsoldering copper pipe joints: it
takes more heat than soldering them.

BTW - I bought the Tubal Cain book based upon a recommendation posted
here. I'd like to second that - it is very good and I learned a lot.

Bob
  #28   Report Post  
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Don Foreman
 
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Default A little metal crank

On 4 Feb 2006 14:25:48 -0800, "Too_Many_Tools"
wrote:

Don,

When you get the time, could you post a picture of your plating setup?

One of my future projects is to build a mobile plating setup with tank,
power supply, heater and such. I am looking for ideas to include in the
setup.

Thanks

TMT


Plating setup? Well, not hardly! It's just a few gallon jugs of
various chemicals from Caswell, a few metal anodes, and a plastic
bucket sitting on the garage--uh, shop -- floor. I bent up some
1/4" square copper stock I found surplus to use as a "bus bar" to hang
the workpiece(s) from using bits of welding rod, stove pipe wire, #12
copper ground wire or whatever's handy. I made a current regulator
to control plating current. I think I have a Word document
describing that. I could post or email that if you'd like. I
don't plate anything that won't fit in the bucket so I don't need
much current. I even plate little stuff in a 2-liter or 4- liter
pyrex beaker.

0 to 3 amps is plenty, though the current regulator is easily
extensible to 20 amps and more. I run it off a 12 volt DC supply.
The regulator uses a 10-turn pot so I can set the current quite
precisely. A current regulator is nice because then I don't blow
meter fuses when (not if) a short happen in the bucket. I use a
cheap DVM from HF as a current meter.

Chrome needs a LOT of current. I don't mess with chrome. Chromic
acid is very nasty stuff, requiring very good positive ventilation. If
I were to do chrome I'd want a dedicated space with a good vent hood.
I don't have either the space or the need for that.

Check out Caswell's website.
www.caswellplating.com
I think there might be some photos of other folks' plating setups
that are a lot neater than my rather hodgepodge collection of jugs
etc.
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