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  #1   Report Post  
Koz
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop

Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop and
one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a difference! They
seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I felt they were
worth every penny.

However.....

Within a month the storeroom fixture (on most of the time) began
randomly going off for 10 or so minutes at a time then coming back on.
The ballast seemed to run a little hot so I tried running it with no
cover plate etc to see if cooling would help. No help. On 15, off 10
for a week or so (and I turned it off most of that time..then dead
fixture. The shop fixture worked ok (on most of the time) but also
exhibited the same "off" sessions, except only about 1 ten minute
session every 2 weeks or so. Shop fixture appears dead today. New
bulbs glow in the filaments but nuttin else.

So, although I LOVED the extra light, the cheepie fixtures just keep
going and going whereas the "better" fixtures both died, one in short
order and one after about a year.

Anyone else have this experience? Where would you go from here if you
were me? More of the cheepie fixtures (I need LOTS more light) or risk
the more expensive high output fixtures again hoping it was just a fluke
in the production lot? I suppose I could replace the ballasts but that
would cost as much as a new fixture and probably be a pain in the neck.

Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


Koz (Who is getting too old to work in the dark)

  #2   Report Post  
Toolbert
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop


"Koz" wrote in message
...
Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop and
one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a difference! They
seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I felt they were
worth every penny.

However.....

Within a month the storeroom fixture (on most of the time) began
randomly going off for 10 or so minutes at a time then coming back on.
The ballast seemed to run a little hot so I tried running it with no
cover plate etc to see if cooling would help. No help. On 15, off 10
for a week or so (and I turned it off most of that time..then dead
fixture. The shop fixture worked ok (on most of the time) but also
exhibited the same "off" sessions, except only about 1 ten minute
session every 2 weeks or so. Shop fixture appears dead today. New
bulbs glow in the filaments but nuttin else.

So, although I LOVED the extra light, the cheepie fixtures just keep
going and going whereas the "better" fixtures both died, one in short
order and one after about a year.

Anyone else have this experience? Where would you go from here if you
were me? More of the cheepie fixtures (I need LOTS more light) or risk
the more expensive high output fixtures again hoping it was just a fluke
in the production lot? I suppose I could replace the ballasts but that
would cost as much as a new fixture and probably be a pain in the neck.

Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


Koz (Who is getting too old to work in the dark)


The fixtures that cycle off are defective - even for the more expensive type
fixtures the big-box stores still compete for who sells the lowest-grade
junk they can get.

8' HO fixtures are great, esp. since they work in unheated spaces and
outdoors. Keep in mind each time you turn them on cold it uses up many
hours worth of operating life.

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better off with
conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better selection of bulbs.

Bob


  #3   Report Post  
Anthony
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop

Koz wrote in
:

Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop and
one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a difference!

They
seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I felt they were
worth every penny.

However.....

Within a month the storeroom fixture (on most of the time) began
randomly going off for 10 or so minutes at a time then coming back on.
The ballast seemed to run a little hot so I tried running it with no
cover plate etc to see if cooling would help. No help. On 15, off 10
for a week or so (and I turned it off most of that time..then dead
fixture. The shop fixture worked ok (on most of the time) but also
exhibited the same "off" sessions, except only about 1 ten minute
session every 2 weeks or so. Shop fixture appears dead today. New
bulbs glow in the filaments but nuttin else.

So, although I LOVED the extra light, the cheepie fixtures just keep
going and going whereas the "better" fixtures both died, one in short
order and one after about a year.

Anyone else have this experience? Where would you go from here if you
were me? More of the cheepie fixtures (I need LOTS more light) or risk
the more expensive high output fixtures again hoping it was just a

fluke
in the production lot? I suppose I could replace the ballasts but that
would cost as much as a new fixture and probably be a pain in the neck.

Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


Koz (Who is getting too old to work in the dark)


Make ABSOLUTELY SURE you do not mount the lights directly to the ceiling.
There should be at least 1/2" of air space between the fixture and the
ceiling. This is for cooling. If they were directly mounted, this could
very well be the cause of the failures.

I would recommend the 4' fixtures. Bulbs are MUCH cheaper, the fixtures
are cheaper. If you row them, space them 2' apart along the row, still
get plenty of light...but save the cost of purchasing more fixtures. I
recommend 4 bulb fixtures too.




--
Anthony

You can't 'idiot proof' anything....every time you try, they just make
better idiots.

Remove sp to reply via email
  #4   Report Post  
John Hofstad-Parkhill
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop

I run a couple of 4-bulb T8 conversions in my shop. I can't remember how
many years ago that was. Still the same bulbs, instant on.
They just work & work & work. The fixtures were for suspended ceilings and I
picked them up on sale from Knox, back when there was a Knox. They also sold
the T8 conversion kit. Not cheap, I think back then it was about $30-ish.

"Koz" wrote in message
...
Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop and
one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a difference! They
seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I felt they were
worth every penny.

However.....

Within a month the storeroom fixture (on most of the time) began
randomly going off for 10 or so minutes at a time then coming back on.
The ballast seemed to run a little hot so I tried running it with no
cover plate etc to see if cooling would help. No help. On 15, off 10
for a week or so (and I turned it off most of that time..then dead
fixture. The shop fixture worked ok (on most of the time) but also
exhibited the same "off" sessions, except only about 1 ten minute
session every 2 weeks or so. Shop fixture appears dead today. New
bulbs glow in the filaments but nuttin else.

So, although I LOVED the extra light, the cheepie fixtures just keep
going and going whereas the "better" fixtures both died, one in short
order and one after about a year.

Anyone else have this experience? Where would you go from here if you
were me? More of the cheepie fixtures (I need LOTS more light) or risk
the more expensive high output fixtures again hoping it was just a fluke
in the production lot? I suppose I could replace the ballasts but that
would cost as much as a new fixture and probably be a pain in the neck.

Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


Koz (Who is getting too old to work in the dark)



  #5   Report Post  
Gunner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 01:58:36 GMT, "Toolbert"
wrote:

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better off with
conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better selection of bulbs.

Bob


And bulbs are a hell of a lot cheaper.

I have a sealed lighting unit that came off an oil rig. Big steel box
with some sort of transparent window. Makes a hell of a work light..2
4' tubes, rugged as hell. Only problem is..the bulbs are the type
that have two close contacts in each end, inside of an oval tit,
unlike the two pin or single nipple type bulbs. The local hardware
store wants $14.USD for Each tube.

Gnerk!!!!!!!!!!

Gunner

" ..The world has gone crazy. Guess I'm showing my age...
I think it dates from when we started looking at virtues
as funny. It's embarrassing to speak of honor, integrity,
bravery, patriotism, 'doing the right thing', charity,
fairness. You have Seinfeld making cowardice an acceptable
choice; our politicians changing positions of honor with
every poll; we laugh at servicemen and patriotic fervor; we
accept corruption in our police and bias in our judges; we
kill our children, and wonder why they have no respect for
Life. We deny children their childhood and innocence- and
then we denigrate being a Man, as opposed to a 'person'. We
*assume* that anyone with a weapon will use it against his
fellowman- if only he has the chance. Nah; in our agitation
to keep the State out of the church business, we've
destroyed our value system and replaced it with *nothing*.
Turns my stomach- " Chas , rec.knives


  #6   Report Post  
Bruce L. Bergman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 10:33:14 -0800, Koz
wrote:

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop and
one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a difference! They
seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I felt they were
worth every penny. However.....

Within a month the storeroom fixture (on most of the time) began
randomly going off for 10 or so minutes at a time then coming back on.
The ballast seemed to run a little hot so I tried running it with no
cover plate etc to see if cooling would help. No help. On 15, off 10
for a week or so (and I turned it off most of that time..then dead
fixture. The shop fixture worked ok (on most of the time) but also
exhibited the same "off" sessions, except only about 1 ten minute
session every 2 weeks or so. Shop fixture appears dead today. New
bulbs glow in the filaments but nuttin else.

So, although I LOVED the extra light, the cheepie fixtures just keep
going and going whereas the "better" fixtures both died, one in short
order and one after about a year.


They sell cheap fixtures in many different styles - and there are
good companies that take the cheap parts and build nice fixtures with
them - but they still hve cheap components. Stick with one of the
major brands like Lithonia, they describe the quality level you're
getting.

Anyone else have this experience? Where would you go from here if you
were me? More of the cheepie fixtures (I need LOTS more light) or risk
the more expensive high output fixtures again hoping it was just a fluke
in the production lot? I suppose I could replace the ballasts but that
would cost as much as a new fixture and probably be a pain in the neck.


Go for efficiency - get "Shop Light" or "Troffer" style fixtures
with built--in reflectors, so most of the light goes down to where you
need it - open strip fluorescents are wasting lumens lighting up the
ceiling and upper walls, which doesn't help you at all.

You could use LowBay metal halide fixtures with a 14' ceiling,you
get tons of light for the same watts - but they do take 10 minutes to
strike and warm up before they're up to full brightness, so provide
some fluorescents to prevent total darkness if a momentary power dip
turns out the big lights. And they are available in 120V models.

If you go Metal Halide be careful to order the lamps with the
internal arc-tube guards, and the fixtures with a lower lens - the
inner tube can shatter at end-of-life, and if the outer lamp envelope
also breaks you can get a shower of hot glass... Not good.

Add Task Lighting - get focused fixtures over certain machinery you
need better light while using, controlled by seperate switches so they
aren't running when the machine isn't.

Electronic ballasts are better in fluorescents, they have almost no
flicker. Any fixture can be built with them, but you pay a small
price preium in most fixtures and may have to wait a few extra days to
get them.

High Output lamps are really only needed in unheated out-buildings
in the snow belt, signs, outside lighting and walk-in coolers - most
regular ffluorescents will start relaibly down to 50F.

Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


Well, lots of regular fixtures are going to draw lots of 120V, so
you might want to address that power supply issue anyways...
And check the labels on those surplus fixtures carefully before you
pass on them, they could be straight 240V but most are available with
"Multi-Tap" ballasts that take 120/208/240/277 volts. I always order
them that way, so the customer isn't stuck if they want to use them in
another location.

-- Bruce --
--
Bruce Bergman, Woodland Hills CA USA.
Return address spam-trapped - Remove the Invalid Python using a Net.
  #7   Report Post  
Nick Hull
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

In article ,
Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 01:58:36 GMT, "Toolbert"
wrote:

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better off with
conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better selection of bulbs.

Bob


And bulbs are a hell of a lot cheaper.


Try the Phillips 5000 K daylight bulbs. A lot brighter WHITE light.

--
free men own guns - slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
  #8   Report Post  
Ken Vale
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

Koz wrote:

Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop
and one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a
difference! They seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I
felt they were worth every penny.

snip
Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


When I worked in a paint store we got in some kind of special
lights, I don't remember the company name (might have been Spectrum),
they were standard 4' bulbs that produced 97% of regular sunlight
(almost true colour, way brighter than standard flourescents). They cost
more than the standard light (I think almost double) but they lasted a
long time so it wasn't a bad trade off. These lights just went into a
standard fixture.
Ken

  #9   Report Post  
BEAR
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

For what it is worth...

I have a pretty decent stock of brandy new *electronic ballasts*
for 8 foot bulbs that I would be happy to sell to you for one money
for all, and a whole lot less than new... they're fine, I don't use
8ft bulbs, and I got a large lot for the 4' electronic ballasts.

They work well, don't hum, (nice) and stay cool.

Regards,

_-_-bear
PS. for shop and lab lighting, I've never bought a new fixture -
the dumpsters seem full of completely servicable fixtures on a
regular basis... ymmv. (of course I swap out the old ballasts
for electronic ones now)


--
_-_- BEAR Labs
- Custom Audio Equipment, Cables, Mods, Repairs -
http://www.bearlabs.com


  #10   Report Post  
BEAR
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop



Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 01:58:36 GMT, "Toolbert"
wrote:

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better off with
conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better selection of bulbs.

Bob


And bulbs are a hell of a lot cheaper.

I have a sealed lighting unit that came off an oil rig. Big steel box
with some sort of transparent window. Makes a hell of a work light..2
4' tubes, rugged as hell. Only problem is..the bulbs are the type
that have two close contacts in each end, inside of an oval tit,
unlike the two pin or single nipple type bulbs. The local hardware
store wants $14.USD for Each tube.

Gnerk!!!!!!!!!!


Ummm change out the "sockets" for the standard type and
proceed with the $0.99 4 foot bulbs?

_-_-bear



Gunner

" ..The world has gone crazy. Guess I'm showing my age...
I think it dates from when we started looking at virtues
as funny. It's embarrassing to speak of honor, integrity,
bravery, patriotism, 'doing the right thing', charity,
fairness. You have Seinfeld making cowardice an acceptable
choice; our politicians changing positions of honor with
every poll; we laugh at servicemen and patriotic fervor; we
accept corruption in our police and bias in our judges; we
kill our children, and wonder why they have no respect for
Life. We deny children their childhood and innocence- and
then we denigrate being a Man, as opposed to a 'person'. We
*assume* that anyone with a weapon will use it against his
fellowman- if only he has the chance. Nah; in our agitation
to keep the State out of the church business, we've
destroyed our value system and replaced it with *nothing*.
Turns my stomach- " Chas , rec.knives


--
_-_- BEAR Labs
- Custom Audio Equipment, Cables, Mods, Repairs -
http://www.bearlabs.com




  #11   Report Post  
Gunner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 13:27:44 -0500, BEAR wrote:



Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 01:58:36 GMT, "Toolbert"
wrote:

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better off with
conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better selection of bulbs.

Bob


And bulbs are a hell of a lot cheaper.

I have a sealed lighting unit that came off an oil rig. Big steel box
with some sort of transparent window. Makes a hell of a work light..2
4' tubes, rugged as hell. Only problem is..the bulbs are the type
that have two close contacts in each end, inside of an oval tit,
unlike the two pin or single nipple type bulbs. The local hardware
store wants $14.USD for Each tube.

Gnerk!!!!!!!!!!


Ummm change out the "sockets" for the standard type and
proceed with the $0.99 4 foot bulbs?

_-_-bear

The design is such..that it cannt be done without major surgery and a
redesign. Cheaper to toss it and buy one of the $10 fixtures

Gunner



Gunner

" ..The world has gone crazy. Guess I'm showing my age...
I think it dates from when we started looking at virtues
as funny. It's embarrassing to speak of honor, integrity,
bravery, patriotism, 'doing the right thing', charity,
fairness. You have Seinfeld making cowardice an acceptable
choice; our politicians changing positions of honor with
every poll; we laugh at servicemen and patriotic fervor; we
accept corruption in our police and bias in our judges; we
kill our children, and wonder why they have no respect for
Life. We deny children their childhood and innocence- and
then we denigrate being a Man, as opposed to a 'person'. We
*assume* that anyone with a weapon will use it against his
fellowman- if only he has the chance. Nah; in our agitation
to keep the State out of the church business, we've
destroyed our value system and replaced it with *nothing*.
Turns my stomach- " Chas , rec.knives


'If you own a gun and have a swimming pool in the yard, the swimming
pool is almost 100 times more likely to kill a child than the gun is.'"
Steven Levitt, UOC prof.
  #12   Report Post  
Bruce L. Bergman
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 15:20:25 GMT, Ken Vale
wrote:
Koz wrote:

Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop
and one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a
difference! They seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I
felt they were worth every penny.

snip
Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


When I worked in a paint store we got in some kind of special
lights, I don't remember the company name (might have been Spectrum),
they were standard 4' bulbs that produced 97% of regular sunlight
(almost true colour, way brighter than standard flourescents). They cost
more than the standard light (I think almost double) but they lasted a
long time so it wasn't a bad trade off. These lights just went into a
standard fixture.
Ken


They are a standard F40T12 lamp with a special phosphor blend on the
envelope, and are available at good home centers and supply houses -
they are a lot more money ($4 to $6 each compared to $1 for cheapies)
but seriously worth the difference. Also available in many other
sizes and styles to match your fixtures (HO, 4'-6'-8' Slimline
single-pin, 40W U-tube, PL compact [Ott Lite], etc.) but may need to
be special ordered.

I use the GE SPEC-50 (5000K "Daylight") lamps around the house, but
there are many brands available with the same choices of color
temperature (in degrees Kelvin - "Warm White is 2700K and Cool White
is 4100K) and Color Rendering Index (how closely does it match natural
daylight). Ask to see a catalog at your favorite supplier.

-- Bruce --
--
Bruce Bergman, Woodland Hills CA USA.
Return address spam-trapped - Remove the Invalid Python using a Net.
  #13   Report Post  
ATP
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

Gunner wrote:
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 13:27:44 -0500, BEAR wrote:



Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 01:58:36 GMT, "Toolbert"
wrote:

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better
off with conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better
selection of bulbs.

Bob

And bulbs are a hell of a lot cheaper.

I have a sealed lighting unit that came off an oil rig. Big steel
box with some sort of transparent window. Makes a hell of a work
light..2 4' tubes, rugged as hell. Only problem is..the bulbs are
the type that have two close contacts in each end, inside of an
oval tit, unlike the two pin or single nipple type bulbs. The local
hardware store wants $14.USD for Each tube.

Gnerk!!!!!!!!!!


Ummm change out the "sockets" for the standard type and
proceed with the $0.99 4 foot bulbs?

_-_-bear

The design is such..that it cannt be done without major surgery and a
redesign. Cheaper to toss it and buy one of the $10 fixtures

Gunner

Costco has a 65 watt flourescent floodlight/worklight for $18.99. It puts
out a lot of cool light, although I can't predict for how long, some of
those cheapo fixtures have disappointed me in the past.


  #14   Report Post  
ATP
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

Koz wrote:
Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Buy the ballasts on ebay would be my first suggestion. Second would be to
buy/acquire a lot of T8 fixtures, even lay-in ones. They should be available
for next to nothing somewhere near you. Everytime I retrofit lighting, even
if the "old" fixtures are only 5 years old with T8 lamps,reflectors, etc., I
can't even give them away. Hi-bay fixtures are also available cheap,
although the lumens/watt really isn't appreciably better than T8 lamps.


  #15   Report Post  
keith bowers
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop

Koz wrote:

Just lookin for some better ideas before I plunk down my money.

Shop is about 1500 square feet, 14' ceilings and lighted with several
sets of 8' flourescents. Last year I replaced one unit in the shop and
one in the storeroom with high output fixtures. What a difference! They
seemed to put out twice the light and at that time I felt they were
worth every penny.

However.....

Within a month the storeroom fixture (on most of the time) began
randomly going off for 10 or so minutes at a time then coming back on.
The ballast seemed to run a little hot so I tried running it with no
cover plate etc to see if cooling would help. No help. On 15, off 10
for a week or so (and I turned it off most of that time..then dead
fixture. The shop fixture worked ok (on most of the time) but also
exhibited the same "off" sessions, except only about 1 ten minute
session every 2 weeks or so. Shop fixture appears dead today. New
bulbs glow in the filaments but nuttin else.

So, although I LOVED the extra light, the cheepie fixtures just keep
going and going whereas the "better" fixtures both died, one in short
order and one after about a year.

Anyone else have this experience? Where would you go from here if you
were me? More of the cheepie fixtures (I need LOTS more light) or risk
the more expensive high output fixtures again hoping it was just a fluke
in the production lot? I suppose I could replace the ballasts but that
would cost as much as a new fixture and probably be a pain in the neck.

Any other suggestions for light that won't break the budget? (120v by
the way...underpowered shop and no 220v available up there for the
commercial lighting fixtures often available surplus).


Koz (Who is getting too old to work in the dark)


You might want to look at the Cooper/Regent WQ300 300W wide angle outdoor
halogen floods Lowe's sells for about $10 for area lighting. They can be
mounted within 1.5" of a flamable surface. The output is 6,000 lumens and
the coverage area is 70'x70' when mounted at a 45 deg. angle 12' up. Bulb
life is 2,000 hours. There is also a 500W version that puts out 10,500
lumens (according to the box). They are cheap and may be interesting for
certain situations.

For what it's worth I picked up nine four-tube 4' standard start fixtures
from Western Electric surplus around 1967. The ballasts started failing
about five years ago; About then I found a bunch of solid state industrial
ballasts at a hamfest and replaced the standard start units as they failed.
The electronics haven't held up well at all.1've used about six of the
electronics so far and four of them have failed 8o(.
--
Keith Bowers - Thomasville, NC


  #16   Report Post  
BEAR
 
Posts: n/a
Default Flourescent lights in the shop



Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 13:27:44 -0500, BEAR wrote:



Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 01:58:36 GMT, "Toolbert"
wrote:

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better off with
conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better selection of bulbs.

Bob

And bulbs are a hell of a lot cheaper.

I have a sealed lighting unit that came off an oil rig. Big steel box
with some sort of transparent window. Makes a hell of a work light..2
4' tubes, rugged as hell. Only problem is..the bulbs are the type
that have two close contacts in each end, inside of an oval tit,
unlike the two pin or single nipple type bulbs. The local hardware
store wants $14.USD for Each tube.

Gnerk!!!!!!!!!!


Ummm change out the "sockets" for the standard type and
proceed with the $0.99 4 foot bulbs?

_-_-bear

The design is such..that it cannt be done without major surgery and a
redesign. Cheaper to toss it and buy one of the $10 fixtures


Stay far away from those cheap-o dual bulb "shoplites".

They use the bulbs in a "relaxation oscillator" rather than in a ballast
set up - in many of them - which eats bulbs for lunch. If it has a real
ballast, ok...

As I mentioned, around these parts flourescent fixtures only require some
dumpster diving - refurb'd stores are my favorite dumpsters, chock full
of lights of all types... as is the local junk yard, I'd bet. Good quality stuff
too... ymmv.

_-_-bear
--
_-_- BEAR Labs
- Custom Audio Equipment, Cables, Mods, Repairs -
http://www.bearlabs.com


  #17   Report Post  
BEAR
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop



keith bowers wrote:



Snip



For what it's worth I picked up nine four-tube 4' standard start fixtures
from Western Electric surplus around 1967. The ballasts started failing
about five years ago; About then I found a bunch of solid state industrial
ballasts at a hamfest and replaced the standard start units as they failed.
The electronics haven't held up well at all.1've used about six of the
electronics so far and four of them have failed 8o(.
--
Keith Bowers - Thomasville, NC


Just curious what brand electronic ballasts have failed?

I've been running a row of 4 x 4 bulb toughers over one row of
lab benches for about 4 years, 12 hrs a day no failures yet...

Also are you running the ballasts with the suggested bulb types?
Some of them take the "watt saver" bulbs and not the 40 watt
type and some take both, and some run only the 40 watt style
and don't like the other...

And maybe the ones from the hamfest were actually rejects,
and that's how they ended up there... s'pose it's possible.

_-_-bear


--
_-_- BEAR Labs
- Custom Audio Equipment, Cables, Mods, Repairs -
http://www.bearlabs.com


  #18   Report Post  
RWatson767
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop

Gunner
Flourescent lights in the shop


The local hardware store wants $14.USD for Each tube.

Try bulbman.com

Bob AZ
  #19   Report Post  
Gunner
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 22:42:39 -0500, BEAR wrote:



Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 13:27:44 -0500, BEAR wrote:



Gunner wrote:

On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 01:58:36 GMT, "Toolbert"
wrote:

If you don't need the cold-weather feature I think you're better off with
conventional 4' fixtures though. Last longer, better selection of bulbs.

Bob

And bulbs are a hell of a lot cheaper.

I have a sealed lighting unit that came off an oil rig. Big steel box
with some sort of transparent window. Makes a hell of a work light..2
4' tubes, rugged as hell. Only problem is..the bulbs are the type
that have two close contacts in each end, inside of an oval tit,
unlike the two pin or single nipple type bulbs. The local hardware
store wants $14.USD for Each tube.

Gnerk!!!!!!!!!!

Ummm change out the "sockets" for the standard type and
proceed with the $0.99 4 foot bulbs?

_-_-bear

The design is such..that it cannt be done without major surgery and a
redesign. Cheaper to toss it and buy one of the $10 fixtures


Stay far away from those cheap-o dual bulb "shoplites".

They use the bulbs in a "relaxation oscillator" rather than in a ballast
set up - in many of them - which eats bulbs for lunch. If it has a real
ballast, ok...

As I mentioned, around these parts flourescent fixtures only require some
dumpster diving - refurb'd stores are my favorite dumpsters, chock full
of lights of all types... as is the local junk yard, I'd bet. Good quality stuff
too... ymmv.

_-_-bear


I replaced 25 8' double tube fixtures in a grinding shop a couple
months ago, but the ballasts were all toast, and the owner wanted new
fixtures with the new high output lamps. Way bright, but run way
hotter. One of my Secret Sources had some 4', 4 tube recessed fixtures
for suspended ceilings and I snagged one for $15 with the bulbs. I
hung it over my major work area. I went back a couple weeks ago for
another one when I was a bit more flush, and they were out, but they
said they had more coming in after the new year.

Gunner

'If you own a gun and have a swimming pool in the yard, the swimming
pool is almost 100 times more likely to kill a child than the gun is.'"
Steven Levitt, UOC prof.
  #21   Report Post  
Nick Hull
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop

In article ,
Gunner wrote:


hotter. One of my Secret Sources had some 4', 4 tube recessed fixtures
for suspended ceilings and I snagged one for $15 with the bulbs. I
hung it over my major work area. I went back a couple weeks ago for


In my own tests the light output from a 2-tube hanging shop light is
equal to a 4-tube recessed fixture. The 4- tube puts out twice the
heat, a consideration if you air condition.

--
free men own guns - slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
  #22   Report Post  
keith bowers
 
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Default Flourescent lights in the shop

BEAR wrote:



keith bowers wrote:



Snip



For what it's worth I picked up nine four-tube 4' standard start fixtures
from Western Electric surplus around 1967. The ballasts started failing
about five years ago; About then I found a bunch of solid state
industrial ballasts at a hamfest and replaced the standard start units as
they failed. The electronics haven't held up well at all.1've used about
six of the electronics so far and four of them have failed 8o(.
--
Keith Bowers - Thomasville, NC


Just curious what brand electronic ballasts have failed?

I've been running a row of 4 x 4 bulb toughers over one row of
lab benches for about 4 years, 12 hrs a day no failures yet...

Also are you running the ballasts with the suggested bulb types?
Some of them take the "watt saver" bulbs and not the 40 watt
type and some take both, and some run only the 40 watt style
and don't like the other...

And maybe the ones from the hamfest were actually rejects,
and that's how they ended up there... s'pose it's possible.

_-_-bear


--
_-_- BEAR Labs
- Custom Audio Equipment, Cables, Mods, Repairs -
http://www.bearlabs.com

I used the correct lamps. I have used up the stash and would have to take a
fixture apart to get the name. The dead ones are somewhere in the old
chicken house.
--
Keith Bowers - Thomasville, NC
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