Electronics Repair (sci.electronics.repair) Discussion of repairing electronic equipment. Topics include requests for assistance, where to obtain servicing information and parts, techniques for diagnosis and repair, and annecdotes about success, failures and problems.

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Old February 3rd 08, 07:11 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3


I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3

I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:

electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?

I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?

Thanks,

Zalek

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Old February 3rd 08, 07:29 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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Posts: 2
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

wrote in message
...

I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3

I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:

electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?

I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?

Thanks,

Zalek


You can purchase a 120V AC fan at an electrical store, but make sure it not
too fast or you will hear it. Most computer fans are 12V and will work with
just about any 12V converter that you laying around, or you can get one at
an electronics stores.


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Old February 3rd 08, 07:32 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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Posts: 2
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

wrote in message
...

I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3

I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:

electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?

I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?

Thanks,

Zalek


If it was me, I'd put a small fan in the lower right (viewed from the back)
section pointing towards the side (just below where the power cable
connects) to suck air from the inside. You can get those same style fans in
115 VAC (GOOGLE is your friend) so as not to have to deal with another power
supply. BTW, computer fans are usually 12 V not 5 V.

--
SoCalCommie
http://so-la-i.com/

WARNING: Due to Presidential Executive Orders, the National Security Agency
may have read this message without warning, warrant, or notice. They may do
this without any judicial or legislative oversight.


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Old February 3rd 08, 07:56 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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Posts: 7
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

On Sun, 03 Feb 2008 18:11:23 GMT, wrote:

electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG

Is the case itself getting hot? If so, simply sticking on some
passive heat sinks might do the job, something like:

http://rocky.digikey.com/scripts/Pro...M=198540B00000

J.


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Old February 3rd 08, 08:04 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
T T is offline
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Posts: 44
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

In article ,
says...
wrote in message
...

I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3

I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:

electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?

I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?

Thanks,

Zalek


If it was me, I'd put a small fan in the lower right (viewed from the back)
section pointing towards the side (just below where the power cable
connects) to suck air from the inside. You can get those same style fans in
115 VAC (GOOGLE is your friend) so as not to have to deal with another power
supply. BTW, computer fans are usually 12 V not 5 V.



And should you put a fan in be sure to use a filter. Dust is another
enemy of small electronics.



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Old February 3rd 08, 08:15 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 395
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

writes:

I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3

I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:

electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?

I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?


Those bands are the most common failure mode for LCDs.
There is some kind connector inside with a lot of pins.
The heat is making them loose contact.

I don't think it's cost effective to repair, but if you
succeed let us know. I have 2 LCDs with this problem
that I'm going to dispose of in the spring cleanup.
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Old February 3rd 08, 09:43 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair, sci.electronics.design, alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 13
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

On Feb 3, 2:01 pm, wrote:
On Sun, 03 Feb 2008 18:11:23 GMT, wrote:

I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3


I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:


electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?


I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?


Thanks,


Zalek


A fan will only solve the problem temporarily.

Why? Because the TV worked okay for over a year before developing this symtom.
That means something has changed or deteriorated. You have what is called a
"thermal intermittant". That's a problem that shows itself when things get
either hot or cold. The problem is either a solder connection that is going bad
or a component that is failing. If it is a component that is failing, it may be
stressing other components at the same time.

You are ultimately not going to win this one. That much is certain. If the TV
isn't worth a trip to the shop for a proper diagnosis and repair, then you have
nothing to lose except the time and effort. Even with your makeshift
work-around, it's days are numbered. The problem will get worse until there is a
more profound failure.


Well - I tried to repair it - the technician kept it on for over 1
hour, but the TV worked OK. I noticed that the temperature in his shop
was much lower then in my apartment - I told him, but technician gave
up and refused to give estimate. I enjoy to play with electronics
gadget, so even my project will fail - for me it is fun.

Zalek
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Old February 3rd 08, 09:46 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair, sci.electronics.design, alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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Posts: 13
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

On Feb 3, 2:04 pm, T wrote:
In article ,
says...



wrote in message
.. .


I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3


I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:


electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?


I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?


Thanks,


Zalek


If it was me, I'd put a small fan in the lower right (viewed from the back)
section pointing towards the side (just below where the power cable
connects) to suck air from the inside. You can get those same style fans in
115 VAC (GOOGLE is your friend) so as not to have to deal with another power
supply. BTW, computer fans are usually 12 V not 5 V.


And should you put a fan in be sure to use a filter. Dust is another
enemy of small electronics.


I noticed the dust collection on my PC motherboard, but how do you
apply dust filter?

Another question - computer fans run on AC or DC?

Thanks,

Zalek

Zalek
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Old February 3rd 08, 10:59 PM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
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First recorded activity by DIYBanter: Feb 2008
Posts: 61
Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

wrote:
I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3

I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:

electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?

I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?

Thanks,

Zalek


Frys and other electronics shops have cans of "circuit
cooler" that can be used to chill a suspect part. You might
be able to pinpoint the part that has changed value over
time. I would tend to look at electrolytic capacitors
first, then stressed diodes or transistors.

Also, try repair shops that have worked on that model, most
likely it is developing a reputation that a tech has seen
before. try the electronics repair boards, or google that
model and "+trouble".

-- larry / dallas
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Old February 4th 08, 12:28 AM posted to sci.electronics.repair,sci.electronics.design,alt.home.repair,alt.tv.tech.hdtv
T T is offline
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Default Repairing LCD TV - Westinghouse LTV-32W3

In article 30022c55-c5f2-4bba-b09b-f09a6fc797a7
@v4g2000hsf.googlegroups.com, says...
On Feb 3, 2:04 pm, T wrote:
In article ,
says...



wrote in message
.. .


I am trying repaire my LCD TV Westinghouse LTV-32W3. I purchased it 1
1/2 year ago - it worked OK for about 1 year. After warranty expired
it works OK for about hour, after 1 hour the following symptoms
appeared:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...Bad-TV-2-1.wmv
The TV on the left is a good one, on the right Westinghouse LTV-32W3


I come to conclusion that some parts in the TV are getting too hot. To
test my theory I removed TV's back cover to allow better air
circulation - now TV is working without problem. What I want to do is
to install small fan to make a better cooling.
I am not a TV technician, so here are my questions:


electronics parts that are getting hot are enclosed in a metal case:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0014.JPG
here electonic parts with metal case removed:
http://www.evkosystems.kgbinternet.c...v/IMG_0017.JPG
I guess the metal case is to prevent electromagnetic transmition - can
I make more holes in a metal case without causing electromagnetic
interferrence?


I plan to put inside a small fan, similar to one used in computers -
can you recommend one?
Can you recommend simply converter from 110 AC to 5V(?) DC to power
this fan?


Thanks,


Zalek


If it was me, I'd put a small fan in the lower right (viewed from the back)
section pointing towards the side (just below where the power cable
connects) to suck air from the inside. You can get those same style fans in
115 VAC (GOOGLE is your friend) so as not to have to deal with another power
supply. BTW, computer fans are usually 12 V not 5 V.


And should you put a fan in be sure to use a filter. Dust is another
enemy of small electronics.


I noticed the dust collection on my PC motherboard, but how do you
apply dust filter?

Another question - computer fans run on AC or DC?

Thanks,

Zalek

Zalek


It should be on the intake of the fan. As for AC/DC I dont' honesly
know, but I recall that most I've run across seem to be DC.



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