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propane tank as air tank?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 14th 04, 02:17 AM
Jason D.
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Default propane tank as air tank?

Looking to use propane tank either two 20lb or one 40lb tanks as air
tanks?

I'll get new empty tanks FYI if this is doable. I hear they're
supposed to hold up to 300 PSI test as part of requirement as propane
tanks?

Cheers,

Wizard
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  #2  
Old December 14th 04, 03:57 AM
Jeff Wisnia
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Default

Jason D. wrote:
Looking to use propane tank either two 20lb or one 40lb tanks as air
tanks?

I'll get new empty tanks FYI if this is doable. I hear they're
supposed to hold up to 300 PSI test as part of requirement as propane
tanks?

Cheers,

Wizard



The concensus of what I've heard is that while propane tanks will stand
the pressure, they are not as thick walled as tanks designed for air
service. Thus they will rust out much faster if the air in them isn't
thoroughly dry, something that's not to easy to achieve if you're
planning on using them for air compressor storage tanks.

Unless you stand them upside down it won't be easy to add a water drain
valve either.

I did use a 20 lb bottle for several years as an emergency "air pig" for
occassionally filling a flat tire. I installed a kit I purchased for
about $15 which replaced the propane tank valve with a new valve with a
pressure relief, a Schrader (tire valve) filler port, and a 2 foot hose
with a tire valve chuck on its end.

After reading comments to the contrary here and elsewhere I chucked it
and spent $29.95 on a genuine air pig.

HTH,

Jeff

--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
  #3  
Old December 14th 04, 07:35 AM
Jerry J. Wass
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I'd try for an odd-ball vehicular propane tank, much heavier wall--try
some propane
distributors , see what they have and/or will refer you to an
installation/conversion
shop. calls to auto salvage yards might turn up something 20-30 gals.
The little
20-40Lb tanks are too thin-walled--rust out quick--put water drain in
bottom!!

"Jason D." wrote:

Looking to use propane tank either two 20lb or one 40lb tanks as air
tanks?

I'll get new empty tanks FYI if this is doable. I hear they're
supposed to hold up to 300 PSI test as part of requirement as propane
tanks?

Cheers,

Wizard


  #4  
Old December 14th 04, 10:06 AM
Nick Hull
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Default

In article ,
Jeff Wisnia wrote:

The concensus of what I've heard is that while propane tanks will stand
the pressure, they are not as thick walled as tanks designed for air
service. Thus they will rust out much faster if the air in them isn't
thoroughly dry, something that's not to easy to achieve if you're
planning on using them for air compressor storage tanks.

Unless you stand them upside down it won't be easy to add a water drain
valve either.

I did use a 20 lb bottle for several years as an emergency "air pig" for
occassionally filling a flat tire. I installed a kit I purchased for
about $15 which replaced the propane tank valve with a new valve with a
pressure relief, a Schrader (tire valve) filler port, and a 2 foot hose
with a tire valve chuck on its end.

After reading comments to the contrary here and elsewhere I chucked it
and spent $29.95 on a genuine air pig.


I use several 20# tanks as air pigs, no problem as the air is always
dry. If I used them on a compressor I would mount them upside down.
For an adapter I just bought a brass plug and drilled a hole and tapped
it 1/4" FNPT

For portable air pigs I like the discarded Helium tanks of the same size
but much lighter weight but the valve is not as good.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
  #5  
Old December 14th 04, 11:49 AM
Bob Engelhardt
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Default

I use a 40# as an air pig - 20# is too small. Got it free at a refill
station, as it was not OPD.

Got the mercaptan stink out with a little bleach, swished around and
dumped out. I left the propane valve on and used a connector from a gas
grill, with a quick-disconnect on it. I use a male-male adapter to
fill. Put wheels and a long handle on it when it got tiresome carrying
back & forth for refills.

They have a working pressure of 240 psi.

Bob

  #6  
Old December 14th 04, 11:51 AM
Ron Thompson
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Default

Looking to use propane tank either two 20lb or one 40lb tanks as air
tanks?

I'll get new empty tanks FYI if this is doable. I hear they're
supposed to hold up to 300 PSI test as part of requirement as propane
tanks?

Cheers,

Wizard

If you are buying new, why not buy air tanks?


Ron Thompson
On the Beautiful Florida Space Coast, right beside the Kennedy Space Center, USA

http://www.plansandprojects.com

The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is
to fill the world with fools.
--Herbert Spencer, English Philosopher (1820-1903)
  #7  
Old December 14th 04, 04:12 PM
Tim Killian
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Go to the archives for any big-city newspaper and look up some of the
spectacular air compressor tank explosions of the past. There is a
reason why air storage tanks are spec-ed and certified.

The only thing dumber than using an odd-ball tank is plumbing air with
PVC pipe.

Jason D. wrote:

Looking to use propane tank either two 20lb or one 40lb tanks as air
tanks?

I'll get new empty tanks FYI if this is doable. I hear they're
supposed to hold up to 300 PSI test as part of requirement as propane
tanks?

Cheers,

Wizard


  #8  
Old December 14th 04, 05:37 PM
Jeff Wisnia
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Default

Tim Killian wrote:

Go to the archives for any big-city newspaper and look up some of the
spectacular air compressor tank explosions of the past. There is a
reason why air storage tanks are spec-ed and certified.

The only thing dumber than using an odd-ball tank is plumbing air with
PVC pipe.


I should explain (at the risk of repeating myself) that my skepticism
about doing non-spec things involving compressed gasses, as expressed
earlier in this thread, stems from about 50 years ago. I lost a friend
in my scuba diving club when he carelessly used a cast iron 3/4" to 1/2"
pipe thread reducing bushing to fit a "diving valve" to a CO2 fire
extinguisher bottle. Lots of us used fire extinguisher bottles as diving
tanks back then.

The threads on that bushing sheared the first time he was filling the
tank and the valve blew out and hit him under his chin and continued
into his brain, killing him on the spot. The poor guy didn't understand
the shear strengths of different materials. He'd probably still be alive
if he'd used a steel bushing, or maybe even a brass one, but he should
have NEVER used cast iron.

I have the sand cast aluminum "license plate emblem" with our diving
club's logo on it, which came from his car, nailed to my garage wall. I
still think of him every time I look at it, even though I haven't had a
scuba tank on my back for at least 40 years now.

Just my .02,

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"


Jason D. wrote:

Looking to use propane tank either two 20lb or one 40lb tanks as air
tanks?

I'll get new empty tanks FYI if this is doable. I hear they're
supposed to hold up to 300 PSI test as part of requirement as propane
tanks?

Cheers,

Wizard





--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
  #9  
Old December 14th 04, 07:40 PM
jim rozen
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In article , Tim Killian says...

Go to the archives for any big-city newspaper and look up some of the
spectacular air compressor tank explosions of the past. There is a
reason why air storage tanks are spec-ed and certified.


Not all of them are. There are plenty of air compressor tanks and
tire inflator tanks sold that are *not* ASME certified.

I used a brand-new propane tank as part of my air storage farm,
since then I added a tire inflator tank. But I do know that I
have an ASME hard-seat blow-off valve on the tanks.

Jim


--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
  #10  
Old December 14th 04, 08:24 PM
Bob Engelhardt
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Tim Killian wrote:

The only thing dumber than using an odd-ball tank ...


Propane tanks are not "odd ball". They *are* compressed gas tanks, with
DOT specs. Working pressure 240 psi, test pressure 480 psi, design
burst pressure 960 psi. Depending upon the ambient temperature, propane
in a tank is 110 - 130 psi, sort of. Single stage, home-use compressed
air is generally not more than 100 psi.

Bob
 




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