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Default Wood floor plank lengths

Anyone familiar with Lumber Liquidators?

They have some bamboo floors that are onsale for $1.99 / SF which is a very
good price. I remember installing my bamboo floor in the bedroom six years
ago and it was $14.00 / SF installed.

The onky thing is that these are special "closeouts" that are 72" long. The
36" long ones are $3.99 and they look the same.

I am wondering does 72" long plank really work on a room that is only say
12'x12'? The planks are T&G, so if you place at the edge two 6' planks,
what do you do for the next row? If you want it staggered say 12", you may
cut the 72" length plank into a 60" piece and a 12" piece. Then after the
60" piece, you put in a full 72" piece, then the 12" you cut off on one end
will now be placed at the other end? So for each row you use two planks cut
in different lengths?

Somehow I think this will not look good with planks this long. Something
about it bothers me.

Comments?

Thanks!

MC


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Default Wood floor plank lengths

1st Row .... 2 lengths
2nd row ..... 1/2 length, full length, half length
Continue till finished

if you want a more random look
cut a length at any length you like ... dont even have to measure, then lay
full length, then off cut of first length.
repeat till finished

either wat you go the end joins should not be all that obvious as to jump
out and grab you anyway.


"MiamiCuse" wrote in message
...
Anyone familiar with Lumber Liquidators?

They have some bamboo floors that are onsale for $1.99 / SF which is a
very good price. I remember installing my bamboo floor in the bedroom six
years ago and it was $14.00 / SF installed.

The onky thing is that these are special "closeouts" that are 72" long.
The 36" long ones are $3.99 and they look the same.

I am wondering does 72" long plank really work on a room that is only say
12'x12'? The planks are T&G, so if you place at the edge two 6' planks,
what do you do for the next row? If you want it staggered say 12", you
may cut the 72" length plank into a 60" piece and a 12" piece. Then after
the 60" piece, you put in a full 72" piece, then the 12" you cut off on
one end will now be placed at the other end? So for each row you use two
planks cut in different lengths?

Somehow I think this will not look good with planks this long. Something
about it bothers me.

Comments?

Thanks!

MC



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Default Wood floor plank lengths


"MiamiCuse" wrote in message

I am wondering does 72" long plank really work on a room that is only say
12'x12'? The planks are T&G, so if you place at the edge two 6' planks,
what do you do for the next row? If you want it staggered say 12", you
may cut the 72" length plank into a 60" piece and a 12" piece. Then after
the 60" piece, you put in a full 72" piece, then the 12" you cut off on
one end will now be placed at the other end? So for each row you use two
planks cut in different lengths?

Somehow I think this will not look good with planks this long. Something
about it bothers me.


Just whack a couple of them into random lengths and work from there. That
will keep the joints totally random and look good.


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Default Wood floor plank lengths

How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut one end
that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock into the next
plank, right? or is there a trick?

MC

"Paul D" wrote in message
...
1st Row .... 2 lengths
2nd row ..... 1/2 length, full length, half length
Continue till finished

if you want a more random look
cut a length at any length you like ... dont even have to measure, then
lay full length, then off cut of first length.
repeat till finished

either wat you go the end joins should not be all that obvious as to jump
out and grab you anyway.


"MiamiCuse" wrote in message
...
Anyone familiar with Lumber Liquidators?

They have some bamboo floors that are onsale for $1.99 / SF which is a
very good price. I remember installing my bamboo floor in the bedroom
six years ago and it was $14.00 / SF installed.

The onky thing is that these are special "closeouts" that are 72" long.
The 36" long ones are $3.99 and they look the same.

I am wondering does 72" long plank really work on a room that is only say
12'x12'? The planks are T&G, so if you place at the edge two 6' planks,
what do you do for the next row? If you want it staggered say 12", you
may cut the 72" length plank into a 60" piece and a 12" piece. Then
after the 60" piece, you put in a full 72" piece, then the 12" you cut
off on one end will now be placed at the other end? So for each row you
use two planks cut in different lengths?

Somehow I think this will not look good with planks this long. Something
about it bothers me.

Comments?

Thanks!

MC





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Default Wood floor plank lengths

MiamiCuse wrote:
How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut one end
that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock into the next
plank, right? or is there a trick?


Many people use the trick of doing a Google search for the simple
questions.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...wood+floor+DIY

R



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Default Wood floor plank lengths


"RicodJour" wrote in message
oups.com...
MiamiCuse wrote:
How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut one end
that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock into the next
plank, right? or is there a trick?


Many people use the trick of doing a Google search for the simple
questions.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...wood+floor+DIY

R


It is not a simple question. I believe there is no way one can take a 72"
long floor plank and cut it into random lengths and use them if thse planks
are tongue and groove on all four edges. Someone suggested cutting them
but I cannot visualize how this could work.

MC


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Default Wood floor plank lengths

In article ,
MiamiCuse wrote:
...snipped...
It is not a simple question. I believe there is no way one can take a 72"
long floor plank and cut it into random lengths and use them if thse planks
are tongue and groove on all four edges. Someone suggested cutting them
but I cannot visualize how this could work.



Why do they need T&G at the ends? Many if not most floor boards are
only T&G on the sides.


--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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Default Wood floor plank lengths

MiamiCuse wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote in message

MiamiCuse wrote:
How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut one end
that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock into the next
plank, right? or is there a trick?


Many people use the trick of doing a Google search for the simple
questions.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...wood+floor+DIY


It is not a simple question. I believe there is no way one can take a 72"
long floor plank and cut it into random lengths and use them if thse planks
are tongue and groove on all four edges. Someone suggested cutting them
but I cannot visualize how this could work.


It _is_ simple. Look at the link I posted instead of arguing. They
have pretty pictures and explanations and everything!

R

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Default Wood floor plank lengths

On Mar 23, 10:33 pm, "MiamiCuse" wrote:

How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut one end
that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock into the next
plank, right? or is there a trick?


It is not a simple question. I believe there is no way one can take a 72" long floor plank and cut it into random lengths and use them if thse planks are tongue and groove on all four edges. Someone suggested cutting them but I cannot visualize how this could work.

MC


I went to the LL website to look at the floor, and I am not sure you
were clear until asking about the tongue and groove question as to
what you were after. I am not sure the other guys are either. If I
am reading your question right, it has as much to do with installing
the long planks correctly as it does maintaining a pattern of a nice
looking floor.

I THINK this material has T&G all four sides, and at only 5/8" thick,
I
sure hope so. I am basing this reply on that. You may need to dummy
up a couple of model pieces to help you see the tongue and groove on
the ends of our "pieces" to see how this would work. Here goes:

Imagine your 12' wide room. We are only concerned with the edges,
here for purposes of orientation. Put your piece of flooring (a full
plank) in the middle of the floor with the tongue on the left, and the
groove on the right. You should now have 3' on each side to the
walls.

If you get this part, order the material - you got it.

Take another piece of your 6' flooring material, and cut it in half.
With the same orientation of tongue on the left and groove on the
right, hold the pieces in your left and right hands, separately.

Walk up to the full plank on the floor, and put the piece in your left
hand on the right side, which should mate up by putting the tongue on
the piece in the groove on the full plank. Now you are closed with
floor to the wall on the right hand side, and you have a proper edge
joint.

Take the other piece still in your right hand, and mate up the tongue
on the full plank into the groove on your piece. This will close you
to the wall.

You now have one run, with a full piece in the middle, with proper T&G
joints made up on both sides to hold the joints closed in times of
movement. You can use any combination of short pieces using the drop
off by switching the side, but you will ALWAYS have a 6' piece
somewhere in there if you want to maintain the T&G joints.

You could cut 12" off your full plank, start with that piece, then put
your full plank, then put the remaining 60" piece in. The concept is
always the same. But I am with you, unless you were shootnig for some
kind of stairstep pattern, it could look funky.

The solution? To make it random, you could buy a box of the 36"
pieces to mix in, and then you wouldn't have to worry about having to
mate up to a 72" piece to maintain the T&G joints.

I wouldn't butt joint the ends of flooring on a dare. I live in a
really high humidity environment, and the heat causes floors to walk
all over the place here. Joints open, joints close, wood literally
buckles up and pops off the screeds or concrete sometimes.

Make sure you leave the suggested expansion margins around this
flooring. Pop off the shoe mold/quarter round - its cheap to replace
and hold the floor back from the wall.

Clear anything up?

Robert





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Default Wood floor plank lengths


"RicodJour" wrote in message
ups.com...
MiamiCuse wrote:
"RicodJour" wrote in message

MiamiCuse wrote:
How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut one
end
that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock into the
next
plank, right? or is there a trick?

Many people use the trick of doing a Google search for the simple
questions.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...wood+floor+DIY


It is not a simple question. I believe there is no way one can take a
72"
long floor plank and cut it into random lengths and use them if thse
planks
are tongue and groove on all four edges. Someone suggested cutting
them
but I cannot visualize how this could work.


It _is_ simple. Look at the link I posted instead of arguing. They
have pretty pictures and explanations and everything!

R


I am sorry. I think the problem as nailshooter41 stated, is I did a poor
job of communicating in my first post. I have read the links and they dont
specifically address my questions. I have done floor installations in the
past, my question has to do with 36" pieces versus 72" pieces. Sorry to
have confused everyone.

MC




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wrote in message
oups.com...
On Mar 23, 10:33 pm, "MiamiCuse" wrote:

How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut one
end
that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock into the
next
plank, right? or is there a trick?


It is not a simple question. I believe there is no way one can take a
72" long floor plank and cut it into random lengths and use them if thse
planks are tongue and groove on all four edges. Someone suggested

cutting them but I cannot visualize how this could work.

MC


I went to the LL website to look at the floor, and I am not sure you
were clear until asking about the tongue and groove question as to
what you were after. I am not sure the other guys are either. If I
am reading your question right, it has as much to do with installing
the long planks correctly as it does maintaining a pattern of a nice
looking floor.

I THINK this material has T&G all four sides, and at only 5/8" thick,
I
sure hope so. I am basing this reply on that. You may need to dummy
up a couple of model pieces to help you see the tongue and groove on
the ends of our "pieces" to see how this would work. Here goes:

Imagine your 12' wide room. We are only concerned with the edges,
here for purposes of orientation. Put your piece of flooring (a full
plank) in the middle of the floor with the tongue on the left, and the
groove on the right. You should now have 3' on each side to the
walls.

If you get this part, order the material - you got it.

Take another piece of your 6' flooring material, and cut it in half.
With the same orientation of tongue on the left and groove on the
right, hold the pieces in your left and right hands, separately.

Walk up to the full plank on the floor, and put the piece in your left
hand on the right side, which should mate up by putting the tongue on
the piece in the groove on the full plank. Now you are closed with
floor to the wall on the right hand side, and you have a proper edge
joint.

Take the other piece still in your right hand, and mate up the tongue
on the full plank into the groove on your piece. This will close you
to the wall.

You now have one run, with a full piece in the middle, with proper T&G
joints made up on both sides to hold the joints closed in times of
movement. You can use any combination of short pieces using the drop
off by switching the side, but you will ALWAYS have a 6' piece
somewhere in there if you want to maintain the T&G joints.

You could cut 12" off your full plank, start with that piece, then put
your full plank, then put the remaining 60" piece in. The concept is
always the same. But I am with you, unless you were shootnig for some
kind of stairstep pattern, it could look funky.

The solution? To make it random, you could buy a box of the 36"
pieces to mix in, and then you wouldn't have to worry about having to
mate up to a 72" piece to maintain the T&G joints.

I wouldn't butt joint the ends of flooring on a dare. I live in a
really high humidity environment, and the heat causes floors to walk
all over the place here. Joints open, joints close, wood literally
buckles up and pops off the screeds or concrete sometimes.

Make sure you leave the suggested expansion margins around this
flooring. Pop off the shoe mold/quarter round - its cheap to replace
and hold the floor back from the wall.

Clear anything up?

Robert



Robert, yes you hit the nail on my head...I am sorry to have confused
everyone in my first post. The low priced 72" planks are T&G on all four
sides, and thus I cannot see how I can cut a piece down and not use the cut
pieces with the cut end against the wall. Therefore I cannot see how I can
say make ten 72" planks into 20 36" planks and use them that way. It seems
I have to get a full 72" plank into each row, and if I want random or
staggered patterns, it would be a real challenge and I will end up wasting a
lot of pieces that would make it NOT a good deal anymore and better off to
get the 36" planks. Unless I cut them all off at the end and make them a
nail down application instead of glue down,

That was what I was trying to ask, and I did a terrible job asking and
caused a lot of confusion.

MC


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On Mar 24, 8:26 am, "MiamiCuse" wrote:

SNIP

That was what I was trying to ask, and I did a terrible job asking and
caused a lot of confusion.


I wouldn't go overboard on the apologies. I'm, glad to help. I was
thinking that was your predicament as years ago I put a lot of
discount/closeout flooring in rent houses for a guy. We had all kinds
of patterns in rooms trying to use the different lengths that the
flooring outlet couldn't sell.

Thank Rico for my reply - I laughed my ass off at his missive:

It _is_ simple. Look at the link I posted instead of arguing. They
have pretty pictures and explanations and everything!


R


I thought he was going to smack your ass and send you to your room to
work on your coloring books with no TV or computer.

Love that sarcasm.

DON"T ARGUE WITH ME GDAMNIT - LOOK AT MY LINK! So what I tell you to
do, I don't care if it answers your questions!

I had this great image in my head of MC looking at all the "pretty"
pics, the ads, the animated GIFs, the pop ups and everything else...
everything but what he needed.

Gotta laugh.

It's that kind of understanding and generosity that makes the internet
fun.

Robert






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MiamiCuse wrote:
How can I do random length if it is tongue and groove? If I cut
one end that end has to be against the wall and no way it will lock
into the next plank, right? or is there a trick?


The trick is shhh...make new T&G in the cut ends. Or face nail each
end.

--

dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico



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Default Wood floor plank lengths

MiamiCuse wrote:

I am sorry. I think the problem as nailshooter41 stated, is I did a poor
job of communicating in my first post. I have read the links and they dont
specifically address my questions. I have done floor installations in the
past, my question has to do with 36" pieces versus 72" pieces. Sorry to
have confused everyone.


This is a newsgroup. It's text-based. Even the clearest explanation
won't have the clarity of a series of pictures. You have trouble
visualizing things. Words won't help that.

I am not busting your chops (well, maybe a little), I'm trying to
teach you how to find out some of this stuff for yourself. You know
I've helped you with a _bunch_ of questions on various newsgroups, so
it's not like I haven't exerted a little effort on your behalf. All
of these questions have been asked and answered before and there are a
plethora of web sites with the information. If you get stuck, of
course, please _do_ ask your questions. But asking basic questions on
some of this simple stuff makes it look like you want other people to
do your research for you with little or not effort on your part.

The general technique for laying the field works like this:
Cut a board so that the short side is about 9" or so. Use one of the
cut pieces at either end of a row. It will only fit together one way,
and only that one way will allow both cut ends to be hidden under the
baseboard shoe. Fill in with longer planks as necessary. Cut the
longer cut-end piece to finish the row to the right length. On the
next row, cut the shorter end 6" longer; on the row after that another
6" longer. Repeat until you finish the room.

The length of the boards has little to do with it. Length only
affects the amount of waste, and that has to do with your estimating
and layout skills. From that Google search, a few links down, will
help with the layout:
http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/har...wn-racking.htm
and a little further down (even prettier pictures and an _extremely_
detailed explanation) will help with everything:
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/f...k1/stapled.htm

R

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wrote:
On Mar 24, 8:26 am, "MiamiCuse" wrote:

SNIP

That was what I was trying to ask, and I did a terrible job asking and
caused a lot of confusion.


I wouldn't go overboard on the apologies. I'm, glad to help. I was
thinking that was your predicament as years ago I put a lot of
discount/closeout flooring in rent houses for a guy. We had all kinds
of patterns in rooms trying to use the different lengths that the
flooring outlet couldn't sell.

Thank Rico for my reply - I laughed my ass off at his missive:

It _is_ simple. Look at the link I posted instead of arguing. They
have pretty pictures and explanations and everything!


R


I thought he was going to smack your ass and send you to your room to
work on your coloring books with no TV or computer.

Love that sarcasm.

DON"T ARGUE WITH ME GDAMNIT - LOOK AT MY LINK! So what I tell you to
do, I don't care if it answers your questions!

I had this great image in my head of MC looking at all the "pretty"
pics, the ads, the animated GIFs, the pop ups and everything else...
everything but what he needed.

Gotta laugh.

It's that kind of understanding and generosity that makes the internet
fun.


Just for giggles, why not Google how many times I've posted answers to
MC's questions?

You do understand the inverse relationship between generosity and
patience, don't you? If not, send me a dollar. I'll be asking for
another next week...

Glad I could give you a chuckle.

R



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On Mar 24, 10:34 am, "RicodJour" wrote:

Just for giggles, why not Google how many times I've posted answers to MC's questions?


No need to. I know you post a lot of info helping folks on this group
and on others. It was just funny, damnit, the way you fired out at
him.

Everyone knows that level of frustration when dealing with others.
Especially when you feel like you have laid out a road map, told
someone where to start, and then you feel like they want you to drive,
too.

Although this isn't the case here, I have a friend of mine that says
'well Hell, Robert, you've gotten it this far, would you mind helping
me finish?" Meaning of course, would you do it for me. (Not pointing
fingers at you MC).

Worse, when I take the time to email him detailed instructions on how
to do something he will glance over them lightly and then call me
anyway to have me explain over the phone how to do something.

You do understand the inverse relationship between generosity and patience, don't you?


Absolutely. Look how many times I have posted

Try this: linklinklinklink. link link link

I just think it is better than the old famous "DAGS" without even a
sig.

Glad I could give you a chuckle.


Hey, me too. More than once I felt like firing a response back like
that, but in the end, I just go to another thread.

I just was thinking you might have missed something with MC this time.

So you singed his tailfeathers a bit... I say no harm, no foul.

Still with a chuckle over here....

Robert

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"MiamiCuse" wrote in message
...


Robert, yes you hit the nail on my head...I am sorry to have confused
everyone in my first post. The low priced 72" planks are T&G on all four
sides, and thus I cannot see how I can cut a piece down and not use the

cut
pieces with the cut end against the wall. Therefore I cannot see how I

can
say make ten 72" planks into 20 36" planks and use them that way. It

seems
I have to get a full 72" plank into each row, and if I want random or
staggered patterns, it would be a real challenge and I will end up wasting

a
lot of pieces that would make it NOT a good deal anymore and better off to
get the 36" planks. Unless I cut them all off at the end and make them a
nail down application instead of glue down,

That was what I was trying to ask, and I did a terrible job asking and
caused a lot of confusion.

MC



You need to go look at some laid floors. Having a 72" piece in every row is
not a problem at all - in fact it is quite normal. The objective is to have
other random lengths such that the joints are staggered in a nearly, or
seemingly non-repetitive manner. Simply apply what Robert instructed and
you're good to go. Do yourself a favor and think about Robert's reply and
go look at some floors. Don't jump to another question quickly or you won't
be giving yourself enough time to think this through. It's obvious that
you're just not getting it, and that happens sometimes. That's where
looking at other floors will prove to be an immeasurable help.

--

-Mike-



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Default Wood floor plank lengths

First off do you care if joints are 72" apart(that would be a full length
board) If the answer is no then measure the total length of a full run
subtract as many full length boards as you can from the length to find out
what you have left. If it is 12" or more you are good to go with a full
length board to start the first row. cut a board(making sure you have it
orientated in the right direction and cut a piece the right length to finish
off the first row putting the cut end against the wall. Take the other cut
piece (the remainder of the cut board) and if it is 12" or longer start the
next row with it. all joints will be at random as you continue and you
should have very little waist. If joins are too close together you can alter
the size by cutting off a little to make the stagger to suit you or you can
cut a new board to suit and use the pieces where ever and whenever you wish
to keep the waste to a minimum. Keep in mind a cut board with no factory or
grooved end is scrap so keep those to as small a piece as possible.
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

"MiamiCuse" wrote in message
...


Robert, yes you hit the nail on my head...I am sorry to have confused
everyone in my first post. The low priced 72" planks are T&G on all four
sides, and thus I cannot see how I can cut a piece down and not use the

cut
pieces with the cut end against the wall. Therefore I cannot see how I

can
say make ten 72" planks into 20 36" planks and use them that way. It

seems
I have to get a full 72" plank into each row, and if I want random or
staggered patterns, it would be a real challenge and I will end up
wasting

a
lot of pieces that would make it NOT a good deal anymore and better off
to
get the 36" planks. Unless I cut them all off at the end and make them a
nail down application instead of glue down,

That was what I was trying to ask, and I did a terrible job asking and
caused a lot of confusion.

MC



You need to go look at some laid floors. Having a 72" piece in every row
is
not a problem at all - in fact it is quite normal. The objective is to
have
other random lengths such that the joints are staggered in a nearly, or
seemingly non-repetitive manner. Simply apply what Robert instructed and
you're good to go. Do yourself a favor and think about Robert's reply and
go look at some floors. Don't jump to another question quickly or you
won't
be giving yourself enough time to think this through. It's obvious that
you're just not getting it, and that happens sometimes. That's where
looking at other floors will prove to be an immeasurable help.

--

-Mike-





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Default Wood floor plank lengths


"RicodJour" wrote in message
ps.com...
MiamiCuse wrote:

I am sorry. I think the problem as nailshooter41 stated, is I did a poor
job of communicating in my first post. I have read the links and they
dont
specifically address my questions. I have done floor installations in
the
past, my question has to do with 36" pieces versus 72" pieces. Sorry to
have confused everyone.


This is a newsgroup. It's text-based. Even the clearest explanation
won't have the clarity of a series of pictures. You have trouble
visualizing things. Words won't help that.

I am not busting your chops (well, maybe a little), I'm trying to
teach you how to find out some of this stuff for yourself. You know
I've helped you with a _bunch_ of questions on various newsgroups, so
it's not like I haven't exerted a little effort on your behalf. All
of these questions have been asked and answered before and there are a
plethora of web sites with the information. If you get stuck, of
course, please _do_ ask your questions. But asking basic questions on
some of this simple stuff makes it look like you want other people to
do your research for you with little or not effort on your part.

The general technique for laying the field works like this:
Cut a board so that the short side is about 9" or so. Use one of the
cut pieces at either end of a row. It will only fit together one way,
and only that one way will allow both cut ends to be hidden under the
baseboard shoe. Fill in with longer planks as necessary. Cut the
longer cut-end piece to finish the row to the right length. On the
next row, cut the shorter end 6" longer; on the row after that another
6" longer. Repeat until you finish the room.

The length of the boards has little to do with it. Length only
affects the amount of waste, and that has to do with your estimating
and layout skills. From that Google search, a few links down, will
help with the layout:
http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/har...wn-racking.htm
and a little further down (even prettier pictures and an _extremely_
detailed explanation) will help with everything:
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/f...k1/stapled.htm

R


RicodJour, yes you have helped me a great deal and I appreciate all the help
you offered, and no offense taken here. I guess I don't use the usenet the
same way. I assure you I do research and read online materials as well as
various DIY sites, but I also come to the usenet groups and get expert
second opinion as well. I found this has helped a great deal in some cases
especially I get various angles to approach the same problem. Sometimes
even if I am sure what to do about a particular situation, if I have a week
or a few days to prepare for it, I will still post to the usenet and get
some feedback if only to make sure I cover every angle. I found done a
bunch of DIY projects and I have been so lucky that I will have the entire
plan of attack in mind with all scenerios planned out and then when I do it,
I run into situations I never considered. So a lot of times it's not that I
don't do research, it's about getting more input to enforce my approach or
possibly discover flawed thinking that I might have.

MC


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Default Wood floor plank lengths

On Mar 24, 11:14 pm, "MiamiCuse" wrote:

RicodJour, yes you have helped me a great deal and I appreciate all the help
you offered, and no offense taken here. I guess I don't use the usenet the
same way. I assure you I do research and read online materials as well as
various DIY sites, but I also come to the usenet groups and get expert
second opinion as well. I found this has helped a great deal in some cases
especially I get various angles to approach the same problem. Sometimes
even if I am sure what to do about a particular situation, if I have a week
or a few days to prepare for it, I will still post to the usenet and get
some feedback if only to make sure I cover every angle. I found done a
bunch of DIY projects and I have been so lucky that I will have the entire
plan of attack in mind with all scenerios planned out and then when I do it,
I run into situations I never considered. So a lot of times it's not that I
don't do research, it's about getting more input to enforce my approach or
possibly discover flawed thinking that I might have.


Fair enough.

With something like laying out a floor, you can spend hours
researching and asking questions or fifteen minutes laying out the
floor (aka racking) in place. Slide the full length pieces of a few
rows around until you get something that satisfies you and provides
sufficient overlap between rows. Then insure that none of the cut end
pieces are shorter than ~1', and you're good to go.

Good luck with the floor.

R



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Default Wood floor plank lengths

On Sat, 24 Mar 2007 00:33:48 -0400, "MiamiCuse"
wrote:


It is not a simple question. I believe there is no way one can take a 72"
long floor plank and cut it into random lengths and use them if thse planks
are tongue and groove on all four edges. Someone suggested cutting them
but I cannot visualize how this could work.


Simple.

The cut ends go against walls, not other boards.

You can have a 5' and a 1', a 2' and a 4', and two 3' from each plank,
with very little waste. You just don't use both cuttings in the same
course.

Think about it... G
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Default Wood floor plank lengths

Not exactly true. I will take all your scrap flooring off your hands. I can
make any length plank I want with no waste. You can procure a router bit
that is made to reproduce the groove. This bit can make a groove
effortlessly and is a must if you are doing feature strips, mitered ends,
fancy inlay, etc. The cost for a bit is around $35.
"Arvid Sorsdahl" wrote in message
...
First off do you care if joints are 72" apart(that would be a full length
board) If the answer is no then measure the total length of a full run
subtract as many full length boards as you can from the length to find out
what you have left. If it is 12" or more you are good to go with a full
length board to start the first row. cut a board(making sure you have it
orientated in the right direction and cut a piece the right length to
finish off the first row putting the cut end against the wall. Take the
other cut piece (the remainder of the cut board) and if it is 12" or
longer start the next row with it. all joints will be at random as you
continue and you should have very little waist. If joins are too close
together you can alter the size by cutting off a little to make the
stagger to suit you or you can cut a new board to suit and use the pieces
where ever and whenever you wish to keep the waste to a minimum. Keep in
mind a cut board with no factory or grooved end is scrap so keep those to
as small a piece as possible.
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

"MiamiCuse" wrote in message
...


Robert, yes you hit the nail on my head...I am sorry to have confused
everyone in my first post. The low priced 72" planks are T&G on all
four
sides, and thus I cannot see how I can cut a piece down and not use the

cut
pieces with the cut end against the wall. Therefore I cannot see how I

can
say make ten 72" planks into 20 36" planks and use them that way. It

seems
I have to get a full 72" plank into each row, and if I want random or
staggered patterns, it would be a real challenge and I will end up
wasting

a
lot of pieces that would make it NOT a good deal anymore and better off
to
get the 36" planks. Unless I cut them all off at the end and make them
a
nail down application instead of glue down,

That was what I was trying to ask, and I did a terrible job asking and
caused a lot of confusion.

MC



You need to go look at some laid floors. Having a 72" piece in every row
is
not a problem at all - in fact it is quite normal. The objective is to
have
other random lengths such that the joints are staggered in a nearly, or
seemingly non-repetitive manner. Simply apply what Robert instructed and
you're good to go. Do yourself a favor and think about Robert's reply
and
go look at some floors. Don't jump to another question quickly or you
won't
be giving yourself enough time to think this through. It's obvious that
you're just not getting it, and that happens sometimes. That's where
looking at other floors will prove to be an immeasurable help.

--

-Mike-







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Posts: 25
Default Wood floor plank lengths

Thanks for the information, could you tell me where I can buy a set?
"K & D Rossi" wrote in message
et...
Not exactly true. I will take all your scrap flooring off your hands. I
can make any length plank I want with no waste. You can procure a router
bit that is made to reproduce the groove. This bit can make a groove
effortlessly and is a must if you are doing feature strips, mitered ends,
fancy inlay, etc. The cost for a bit is around $35.
"Arvid Sorsdahl" wrote in message
...
First off do you care if joints are 72" apart(that would be a full length
board) If the answer is no then measure the total length of a full run
subtract as many full length boards as you can from the length to find
out what you have left. If it is 12" or more you are good to go with a
full length board to start the first row. cut a board(making sure you
have it orientated in the right direction and cut a piece the right
length to finish off the first row putting the cut end against the wall.
Take the other cut piece (the remainder of the cut board) and if it is
12" or longer start the next row with it. all joints will be at random as
you continue and you should have very little waist. If joins are too
close together you can alter the size by cutting off a little to make the
stagger to suit you or you can cut a new board to suit and use the pieces
where ever and whenever you wish to keep the waste to a minimum. Keep in
mind a cut board with no factory or grooved end is scrap so keep those to
as small a piece as possible.
"Mike Marlow" wrote in message
...

"MiamiCuse" wrote in message
...


Robert, yes you hit the nail on my head...I am sorry to have confused
everyone in my first post. The low priced 72" planks are T&G on all
four
sides, and thus I cannot see how I can cut a piece down and not use the
cut
pieces with the cut end against the wall. Therefore I cannot see how I
can
say make ten 72" planks into 20 36" planks and use them that way. It
seems
I have to get a full 72" plank into each row, and if I want random or
staggered patterns, it would be a real challenge and I will end up
wasting
a
lot of pieces that would make it NOT a good deal anymore and better off
to
get the 36" planks. Unless I cut them all off at the end and make them
a
nail down application instead of glue down,

That was what I was trying to ask, and I did a terrible job asking and
caused a lot of confusion.

MC



You need to go look at some laid floors. Having a 72" piece in every
row is
not a problem at all - in fact it is quite normal. The objective is to
have
other random lengths such that the joints are staggered in a nearly, or
seemingly non-repetitive manner. Simply apply what Robert instructed
and
you're good to go. Do yourself a favor and think about Robert's reply
and
go look at some floors. Don't jump to another question quickly or you
won't
be giving yourself enough time to think this through. It's obvious that
you're just not getting it, and that happens sometimes. That's where
looking at other floors will prove to be an immeasurable help.

--

-Mike-









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