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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

Any thoughts on pros/cons of System3 Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox
for the following uses:
1. Filling holes/gouges and other defects in wood
2. Replacing rotten wood in exterior windows and trim

They both seem rather expensive, so I figured that I might as well get
input from others who have tried both.

Thanks,
Jeff
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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

blueman wrote:
Any thoughts on pros/cons of System3 Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox
for the following uses:
1. Filling holes/gouges and other defects in wood
2. Replacing rotten wood in exterior windows and trim

They both seem rather expensive, so I figured that I might as well get
input from others who have tried both.


Don't have a clue about the above, but it can't be much more than
epoxy thickened with micro-balloons.

SFWIW, I make my own.

If you dig out rotted wood and patch it back with epoxy, then fair it
out when cured, you have basically boat fairing compound hanging onto
a hunk of wood that is probably going to continue to rot anyway.

Depending on how large the repair is, it may be more effective to
replace the rotted piece completely.

You will need to paint it over on exterior applications to provide UV
protection.

Have fun.

Lew
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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

Lew Hodgett writes:
blueman wrote:
Any thoughts on pros/cons of System3 Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox
for the following uses:
1. Filling holes/gouges and other defects in wood
2. Replacing rotten wood in exterior windows and trim

They both seem rather expensive, so I figured that I might as well get
input from others who have tried both.


Don't have a clue about the above, but it can't be much more than
epoxy thickened with micro-balloons.


I have been using System Three and it is a lot better than homemade
stuff mixing epoxy with sawdust. The components are non-sticky and are
kneaded together. Very easy to work and mold -- also the cured
consistency is easy to work, including sanding, drilling, etc.

I haven't used Abatron, but was interested in knowing whether it is
better, worse, or just different before I start buying quantity of
either one.

SFWIW, I make my own.

If you dig out rotted wood and patch it back with epoxy, then fair it
out when cured, you have basically boat fairing compound hanging onto
a hunk of wood that is probably going to continue to rot anyway.

Depending on how large the repair is, it may be more effective to
replace the rotted piece completely.

You will need to paint it over on exterior applications to provide UV
protection.

Have fun.

Lew

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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

I have used Abatron to repair a rotted windowsill. It was my first time
(and only) time using it, but I found it hard to work with. It took a
lot of mixing, and was very stiff. When I applied it, I had a very hard
time smoothing it out. In fact, I couldn't smooth it out. However, when
it cured and I sanded it, it worked very well...my problems with it may
well have been my fault, but if I do another similar repair I plan to
try System Three or MAS epoxy, just to see it they are easier to use.
Eric

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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

blueman wrote:


I have been using System Three and it is a lot better than homemade
stuff mixing epoxy with sawdust. The components are non-sticky and are
kneaded together. Very easy to work and mold -- also the cured
consistency is easy to work, including sanding, drilling, etc.


Unless all you are using sawdust for cosmetic purposes such as to
match a color, as when filling nail holes, that's one thing.

If you are using sawdust as a filler for structural applications, you
are kidding yourself and wasting good epoxy.

Sawdust adds no strength.

OTOH, micro-balloons are very low cost, a 4 cubic ft, 30 lb bag is
less than $25.00.

Add as much as is req'd.

Lew


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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

About 20 years ago, I made some temporary house trim repairs with Minwax
“High Performance Wood Hardener” and “High Performance Wood Filler”. I
thought the repairs would fail because of wood movement being different
than wood filler movement with the change of seasons, etc. I just got
around to replacing the skirt boards and other pieces that had been
patched up – it held up just fine.

All punky wood was removed and several coats of the hardener applied
prior to applying the filler. The hardener is a thinned epoxy that
stabilizes the repair area and helps the bond. I’ve latter learned that
it’s a good idea to drill some small holes in the wood forming “keys”
for the filler to hold. The wood filler is a little tricky. You let it
set up for a while, sculpt it, let it completely harden, than sand it
for finishing.

I’ve heard that Bondo works just as good as the wood filler.
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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

Yes, Bondo works well.

"MartinR" wrote in message
...
About 20 years ago, I made some temporary house trim repairs with Minwax
“High Performance Wood Hardener” and “High Performance Wood Filler”. I
thought the repairs would fail because of wood movement being different
than wood filler movement with the change of seasons, etc. I just got
around to replacing the skirt boards and other pieces that had been
patched up – it held up just fine.

All punky wood was removed and several coats of the hardener applied
prior to applying the filler. The hardener is a thinned epoxy that
stabilizes the repair area and helps the bond. I’ve latter learned that
it’s a good idea to drill some small holes in the wood forming “keys”
for the filler to hold. The wood filler is a little tricky. You let it
set up for a while, sculpt it, let it completely harden, than sand it
for finishing.

I’ve heard that Bondo works just as good as the wood filler.



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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

No error there. Bondo is a good filler, as the poster stated. He never
claimed it to be anything else.
"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message
ink.net...

"MartinR" wrote:

I’ve heard that Bondo works just as good as the wood filler.


Unfortunately, a common error.

Bondo consists of polyester resin and a talc filler.

Polyester is NOT an adhesive.



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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

CW wrote:
No error there. Bondo is a good filler, as the poster stated. He never
claimed it to be anything else.


Two (2) things you can say about Bondo.

It is low cost and feathers to a fine edge.

After that, it is all down hill.

It is heavy, has no strength, and offers very limited adhesion since
it is not an adhesive.

But if it meets your needs, have fun.

Lew
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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

Lew Hodgett writes:
"MartinR" wrote:

I’ve heard that Bondo works just as good as the wood filler.


Unfortunately, a common error.

Bondo consists of polyester resin and a talc filler.

Polyester is NOT an adhesive.

Ever notice the holes in a auto body panel in the area where a Bondo
repair has been made?

the Bondo fills the holes and makes a mechanical bond with the metal.

The same logic was followed years ago in boat building before epoxy
became more cost effective.

OTOH, epoxy is an adhesive.

It's basic limitation is that is does not contain any UV inhibitors
and must be protected in applications exposed to direct sun light.

Lew


What about "Bondo Wood Filler"?
The manufacturer claims:
Rebuilds & restores rotted wood, windowsills, fascial boards,
siding, posts, etc. Replaces missing pieces on antiques, doors,
columns, and tables. Once dry filler can be sanded, shaped,
planed, drilled, routed or sawed. Accepts stain and paint more
naturally than most wood fill products...

Is it the same as Bondo for cars but just rebranded/marketed or is it
really as good as System Three or Abatron wood fill epoxy products?

Thanks




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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

blueman wrote:

Is it the same as Bondo for cars but just rebranded/marketed or is it
really as good as System Three or Abatron wood fill epoxy products?


If you go to the Bondo web site, they appear to offer both polyester
and epoxy products.

If you check out the MSDS for "wood filler", it talks about styrene.

Styrene and polyester go together.


Lew
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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

My experience---stiffness of abatron...happens when one waits too long to apply it. On the contrary, if anything, it is too soft in the beginning and changes consistency/hardens slowly as it heats up. "Smoothing" is a different story. If you want to sand less once cured, I've found that smoothing it with Goof Off (much better that abosolv abatron's solvent) after applied is a great way to get closer to your approximate desired form. Like you said, once cured, it is most sanding friendly.....I have used about 15 gallons of Wood Epox and swear by it. However, my brother from the same mother, swears by System 3 and recently we are truly butting heads about it.

--
For full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/woodwo...ox-340974-.htm

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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

On 5/1/2021 1:01 PM, nonchiaro wrote:
My experience---stiffness of abatron...happens when one waits too long
to apply it. On the contrary, if anything, it is too soft in the
beginning and changes consistency/hardens slowly as it heats up.
"Smoothing" is a different story. If you want to sand less once cured,
I've found that smoothing it with Goof Off (much better that abosolv
abatron's solvent) after applied is a great way to get closer to your
approximate desired form. Like you said, once cured, it is most sanding
friendly.....I have used about 15 gallons of Wood Epox and swear by it.
However, my brother from the same mother, swears by System 3 and
recently we are truly butting heads about it.


Following... I've used the Abatron system before, but it's quite pricey.
I've never used an alternative. How does the price between the two
compare? I've got a lot of 120 year old water damaged windows and wood
work at my house that I really need to start on this summer.
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Default System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

On Sat, 1 May 2021 17:01:37 +0000, nonchiaro
wrote:

My experience---stiffness of abatron...happens when one waits too long to apply it. On the contrary, if anything, it is too soft in the beginning and changes consistency/hardens slowly as it heats up. "Smoothing" is a different story. If you want to sand less once cured, I've found that smoothing it with Goof Off (much better that abosolv abatron's solvent) after applied is a great way to get closer to your approximate desired form. Like you said, once cured, it is most sanding friendly.....I have used about 15 gallons of Wood Epox and swear by it. However, my brother from the same mother, swears by System 3 and recently we are truly butting heads about it.


One of the better trolls in a while but a troll nonetheless.
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