Woodworking Plans and Photos (alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking) - Show off or just share photos of your hard work.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john
  #2   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,171
Default Continuing Work on Deck

On 2/4/2013 7:52 PM, jloomis wrote:
Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john



John,

I may have missed something but what is that freshly poured slab (left
center) for?



  #3   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Hot Tub Pad.

"Unquestionably Confused" wrote in message
...

On 2/4/2013 7:52 PM, jloomis wrote:
Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john



John,

I may have missed something but what is that freshly poured slab (left
center) for?


  #4   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,043
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Looking good, as usual. I was noticing the new requirements for deck ledger
boards in the local iteration of the latest building code adopted by our
municipality. I just kind of skimmed it , but some of it looked downright
idiotic. Has that been an issue where you are?

--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)
  #5   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 576
Default Continuing Work on Deck

On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 17:52:38 -0800, "jloomis"
wrote:

Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john


Looks like my place where you hope the deck will hold up the rest in
an earthquake.


  #6   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 671
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john


I only know a little about deck building but really enjoy watching
what gets done on these projects. It is very educational and
entertaining. One day I would like to have a deck and wanted to thank
you for the education and great ideas.

Btw.. Is it normal for 8x8 posts to warp/curve within a few weeks
after installation? A friend had a tall deck built last year and at
least two of the support posts are seriously curved and coming away
from the wall of his house. His builder said that is normal. I didn't
think coming away from the wall over an inch in a month or two would
be normal, but I'm no expert.

`Casper
  #7   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,043
Default Continuing Work on Deck

On 2/5/2013 8:19 AM, Casper wrote:
Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john


I only know a little about deck building but really enjoy watching
what gets done on these projects. It is very educational and
entertaining. One day I would like to have a deck and wanted to thank
you for the education and great ideas.

Btw.. Is it normal for 8x8 posts to warp/curve within a few weeks
after installation? A friend had a tall deck built last year and at
least two of the support posts are seriously curved and coming away
from the wall of his house. His builder said that is normal. I didn't
think coming away from the wall over an inch in a month or two would
be normal, but I'm no expert.


It is "normal" in the sense that lumber moves as it dries.

The question on if it is a problem revolves around an investigation into
whether the movement of the posts has interfered with:

1. The post's job of providing the necessary "support" required.

2. The visible aspect of the design.

The first is empirical, the second can be subjective according to who is
doing the observing.

A conscientious builder, _with participation by the homeowner_, will at
least attempt rectify the first, particularly if there are contributing
circumstances beyond the builder's control, including wood movement.

Pretty much the same for the second, with beauty being in the eye of the
beholder/designer.

It's tough buying good pressure treated posts these days.

One can look at the end grain and try to chose posts for
critical/visible applications, with a better chance of longer lasting
sucess.

Most 8' PT posts are "peeler core" (centered growth rings on the end
grain), will not absorb the pressure treatment as well, and are more
prone to warping.

Best practice in posts that must perform critical duty is probably to
buy longer posts and cut them to size ... most of the longer lengths are
not peeler core posts .. so check that endgrain when buying posts, or
selecting them from a stack for critical application.

--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
https://plus.google.com/114902129577517371552/posts
http://www.custommade.com/by/ewoodshop/
KarlCaillouet@ (the obvious)
  #8   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,053
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Casper wrote:
Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john


I only know a little about deck building but really enjoy watching
what gets done on these projects. It is very educational and
entertaining. One day I would like to have a deck and wanted to thank
you for the education and great ideas.

Btw.. Is it normal for 8x8 posts to warp/curve within a few weeks
after installation? A friend had a tall deck built last year and at
least two of the support posts are seriously curved and coming away
from the wall of his house. His builder said that is normal. I didn't
think coming away from the wall over an inch in a month or two would
be normal, but I'm no expert.

`Casper


It might be normal for the type/quality of materials used. Kiln dried PT
tends to stay straight.
  #9   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 671
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Swingman was heard to mutter:
It is "normal" in the sense that lumber moves as it dries.


The question on if it is a problem revolves around an investigation into
whether the movement of the posts has interfered with:


1. The post's job of providing the necessary "support" required.
2. The visible aspect of the design.


I forgot to say that two posts (of 10?) are twisting. Once much more
than the other. Think spiral on a candy cane. Is that normal? Is that
acceptable? I ask because this is built on a concrete patio going up
two stories with the intent to put a hot tub on it. My friend was
assured it could hold all that weight, but the twists and gaps would
have me nervous with that kind of a load.

Maybe it's just me. ;/
  #10   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,043
Default Continuing Work on Deck

On 2/5/2013 3:07 PM, Casper wrote:
Swingman was heard to mutter:
It is "normal" in the sense that lumber moves as it dries.


The question on if it is a problem revolves around an investigation into
whether the movement of the posts has interfered with:


1. The post's job of providing the necessary "support" required.
2. The visible aspect of the design.


I forgot to say that two posts (of 10?) are twisting. Once much more
than the other. Think spiral on a candy cane. Is that normal? Is that
acceptable? I ask because this is built on a concrete patio going up
two stories with the intent to put a hot tub on it. My friend was
assured it could hold all that weight, but the twists and gaps would
have me nervous with that kind of a load.

Maybe it's just me. ;/


Impossible to tell/advise without boots on the ground, but simply
because the posts are twisted does not mean they are not doing the job
of support they were put in to do ... which, in a nutshell, is to
transfer the load above directly to the ground.

Still, with the proposed weight of the hot tub being involved, plus a
structure two stories high, your friend may want to pay an Engineer to
take a look. Generally an Engineer's visit like that is in the
neighborhood of 200 - $300 here in Texas, but it does not cost a penny
to make the call and ask the price ... cheap insurance and peace of mind
if nothing else.

Besides, on a structure that tall, it most likely is not big deal to
change, or sister those posts.

--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
https://plus.google.com/114902129577517371552/posts
http://www.custommade.com/by/ewoodshop/
KarlCaillouet@ (the obvious)


  #11   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Yes, deck ledger boards need to be fastened with thru bolts and isolated
from the wood.
I actually put in a pier system next to the house to avoid the ledger issue,
and also do attach
for strength and brace to house isolated by PVC pipe(3/4") out from house.
john

"Swingman" wrote in message
...

Looking good, as usual. I was noticing the new requirements for deck ledger
boards in the local iteration of the latest building code adopted by our
municipality. I just kind of skimmed it , but some of it looked downright
idiotic. Has that been an issue where you are?

--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

  #12   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Continuing Work on Deck

yep......stronger than the average bear.....
john

"Mike M" wrote in message
...

On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 17:52:38 -0800, "jloomis"
wrote:

Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john


Looks like my place where you hope the deck will hold up the rest in
an earthquake.

  #13   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Continuing Work on Deck

Yes, depending on the choice of wood too.
8 x8 are large posts and not kiln dried, and probably pressure treated.
They will warp. They are more than likely heart wood.
Center of tree, thus the warp issue.
john

"Casper" wrote in message
...

Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
john


I only know a little about deck building but really enjoy watching
what gets done on these projects. It is very educational and
entertaining. One day I would like to have a deck and wanted to thank
you for the education and great ideas.

Btw.. Is it normal for 8x8 posts to warp/curve within a few weeks
after installation? A friend had a tall deck built last year and at
least two of the support posts are seriously curved and coming away
from the wall of his house. His builder said that is normal. I didn't
think coming away from the wall over an inch in a month or two would
be normal, but I'm no expert.

`Casper

  #14   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,350
Default Continuing Work on Deck


"jloomis" wrote:

Yes, depending on the choice of wood too.
8 x8 are large posts and not kiln dried, and probably pressure
treated.
They will warp. They are more than likely heart wood.
Center of tree, thus the warp issue.

-----------------------------------------------
I know you are in timber country but has anybody ever given
any thought to using galvanized, 6" dia, 10 Ga pipe for columns?

Lew
..



  #15   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Continuing Work on Deck

That is a good thought.
Not really.
In our decks, the heights are not too high, and the ease of cutting and
making posts makes other ways more costly.
I never have had any problems with posts, twisting, or causing problems.
I have poured concrete curbs that act as joist support, but for low profile
earth to wood decks.
john

"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message
eb.com...


"jloomis" wrote:

Yes, depending on the choice of wood too.
8 x8 are large posts and not kiln dried, and probably pressure treated.
They will warp. They are more than likely heart wood.
Center of tree, thus the warp issue.

-----------------------------------------------
I know you are in timber country but has anybody ever given
any thought to using galvanized, 6" dia, 10 Ga pipe for columns?

Lew
..




  #16   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 44
Default Continuing Work on Deck - Deck.jpg (0/1)

On Mon, 4 Feb 2013 17:52:38 -0800, "jloomis"
wrote:

Poured Concrete today, and ready to set girders and joists.
jo


I really appreciate the images you post of on-going projects.

Thanks for sharing them...

Bdy

(Please see attachment for a couple of curiosity questions)
  #17   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 44
Default Continuing Work on Deck - Deck.jpg (1/1)



Attached Images
File Type: jpg Deck.jpg (412.1 KB, 40 views)
  #18   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 783
Default Continuing Work on Deck - Deck.jpg (1/1)

"Buddy" wrote in message ...


The bump out question reminds me of the stuff kids build in Roblox on the web... seemingly 100 mile long cantilevered structures that are really nothing more than a surface! Im sure there is a more reasonable explanation here. ;~)
  #19   Report Post  
Posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 392
Default Continuing Work on Deck - Deck.jpg (1/1)

That is a home owners job of an attached shed.
He really tucked in his piers.....pier block construction.
I noticed that, but it seems to be ok......except that it did settle.
yes, laser level.
john
"Buddy" wrote in message ...
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OSB work deck treatment Jeff Thies Home Repair 9 September 6th 10 01:38 PM
Deck work - Cleaning and Polishing Neil Jones[_2_] Woodworking 1 March 6th 08 12:12 PM
Continuing work on tractor tiller...... [email protected] Metalworking 2 April 20th 05 01:13 PM
will screening work over a wood deck? orangetrader Home Repair 3 January 23rd 05 02:04 PM
Starting possible deck work in the winter? [email protected] Home Repair 1 January 4th 05 04:22 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:02 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2023, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2023 DIYbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about DIY & home improvement"