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Old July 11th 04, 02:51 PM
Carl McCarty
 
Posts: n/a
Default Nova DVR vs. Nova 3000

I am getting ready to move up to a new lathe. I currently have an old
Delta Homecraft Double Duty lathe.
It works fine but I would like something with more capacity.
I have been looking at the tecknatool site and thinking one of their
lathes would suit my needs well.
I am seeking some advice from more experienced turners than myself if
the DVR motor and different tailstock is realy worth
all that extra money. With the extra $8-900 I could get all the
accessories for the lathe and still have money left over?
I was at Woodcraft the other day, and the salesman was pushing the DVR
pretty hard and acted like the 3000 was a thing of the past. But, they
also had the DVR on the floor and certanly make more money of an $1800
sale than they do $900.
So, if anyone would share their knowledge and point me in one direction
or another, I would appreciate it. Also, if you know of
another lathe in this price range and have a strong arguement for it, I
would like to hear it.
Thanks,
Carl McCarty


  #2   Report Post  
Old July 11th 04, 04:36 PM
Fred Holder
 
Posts: n/a
Default Nova DVR vs. Nova 3000

Hello Carl,

I've owned both the Nova 3000 and currently the Nova DVR 3000. The $900 machine
is an excellent lathe with an ac motor and speed changes are made by changing
belts. I had a 1 HP dc variable speed motor on my Nova 3000, which brought its
price up to almost $1500. My lathe would have been much nicer to use than the
$900 version because of the variable speed. If you've never had variable speed,
you might not miss it. The Nova DVR 3000 is a great step up from the Nova 3000
that I had. There is no belt to insert vibration (belts take a set and then
introduce a small amount of vibration), the motor is somewhere around 2 hp, they
list it as 1.7 hp, but from what I've heard all of the units that Teknatool has
tested produces up to 2.2 hp. Yes, the tailstock is heavier and that is a plus,
but I never had any problems with the tailstock on my Nova 3000. Overall, the
NOva DVR 3000 is a much better lathe than the Nova 3000. However, the Nova 3000
would be a great improvement over the lathe that you currently have. I had the
Nova 3000 for about three years and have had the Nova DVR 3000 for two years. At
this time, I see no need for anything better.

Fred Holder
http://www.fholder.com/

In article , Carl McCarty says...

I am getting ready to move up to a new lathe. I currently have an old
Delta Homecraft Double Duty lathe.
It works fine but I would like something with more capacity.
I have been looking at the tecknatool site and thinking one of their
lathes would suit my needs well.
I am seeking some advice from more experienced turners than myself if
the DVR motor and different tailstock is realy worth
all that extra money. With the extra $8-900 I could get all the
accessories for the lathe and still have money left over?
I was at Woodcraft the other day, and the salesman was pushing the DVR
pretty hard and acted like the 3000 was a thing of the past. But, they
also had the DVR on the floor and certanly make more money of an $1800
sale than they do $900.
So, if anyone would share their knowledge and point me in one direction
or another, I would appreciate it. Also, if you know of
another lathe in this price range and have a strong arguement for it, I
would like to hear it.
Thanks,
Carl McCarty


  #3   Report Post  
Old July 11th 04, 06:14 PM
william kossack
 
Posts: n/a
Default Nova DVR vs. Nova 3000

Buying a lathe is like buying a car. It really depends on what you
think your going to do, what your friends have and how much you want to
spend. I know people that have jet minis and are very happy with them
and I know people with some of the big iron lathes and a few that have
DVR. Many turners have more than one lathe. Like a car owner they have
a pickuptruck lathe to rough out and you don't mind abusing with chunks
that are maybe a bit large, another lathe for general use that you use
more and maybe a sportscar lathe that you got because of your midlife
crises required something flashy to impress turners of a different gender

I've had a DVR for about 4 months and love it. The only problems I've
had with my DVR is getting 5 minutes of time from my teenage son so he
could help me put it on the stand and the problem with a burr developing
in the taper that required the use of a reamer. I've turned both tiny
mini bowls and large bowls with a recent maple chunk that was 17 inches
across and with a weight of mybe 50 pounds that I roughed out a couple
months ago (filling 2 40 gallon trash bags with shavings in the process).

I looked at the bigger and heavier lathes but I had the requirment that
the lathe be semi-portable and I wanted a low RPM for unballanced
chunks. I started out with a grizzly that would bog down at the
slightest touch and start dancing if things were just slightly off
ballence. I love how the DVR puts more power into the motor to maintain
the RPM that you select. One of these days I'm going to convert my
lathe to 220 but I'm not seeing the need at this point.

My DVR sits on a wooden stand made out of 2x4s and 2x6s with wheels at
one end so I can move it out onto the driveway and keep the shavings out
of the garage. This creates a minor problem in that during the sunny
heat of the day the LCD display goes black and hard to read. However, I
generally don't pay too much attention to the RPM. I turn at the speed
I'm comfortable with for the piece I'm turning (if it seems too fast I
slow it down a bit..if it is taking too long I speed it up..sometimes I
turn something slower just because I'm trying to relax and enjoy the
process) Learning on the grizzly I got used to going slow so I have to
keep reminding myself that I have more power and I can go faster without
bogging the lathe down.


Carl McCarty wrote:

I am getting ready to move up to a new lathe. I currently have an old
Delta Homecraft Double Duty lathe.
It works fine but I would like something with more capacity.
I have been looking at the tecknatool site and thinking one of their
lathes would suit my needs well.
I am seeking some advice from more experienced turners than myself if
the DVR motor and different tailstock is realy worth
all that extra money. With the extra $8-900 I could get all the
accessories for the lathe and still have money left over?
I was at Woodcraft the other day, and the salesman was pushing the DVR
pretty hard and acted like the 3000 was a thing of the past. But, they
also had the DVR on the floor and certanly make more money of an $1800
sale than they do $900.
So, if anyone would share their knowledge and point me in one
direction or another, I would appreciate it. Also, if you know of
another lathe in this price range and have a strong arguement for it,
I would like to hear it.
Thanks,
Carl McCarty



  #4   Report Post  
Old July 11th 04, 11:23 PM
Carl McCarty
 
Posts: n/a
Default Nova DVR vs. Nova 3000

Thank you for the reply. I believe I will probaly be spending the extra
money on the DVR.

william kossack wrote:

Buying a lathe is like buying a car. It really depends on what you
think your going to do, what your friends have and how much you want
to spend. I know people that have jet minis and are very happy with
them and I know people with some of the big iron lathes and a few that
have DVR. Many turners have more than one lathe. Like a car owner
they have a pickuptruck lathe to rough out and you don't mind abusing
with chunks that are maybe a bit large, another lathe for general use
that you use more and maybe a sportscar lathe that you got because of
your midlife crises required something flashy to impress turners of a
different gender

I've had a DVR for about 4 months and love it. The only problems I've
had with my DVR is getting 5 minutes of time from my teenage son so he
could help me put it on the stand and the problem with a burr
developing in the taper that required the use of a reamer. I've
turned both tiny mini bowls and large bowls with a recent maple chunk
that was 17 inches across and with a weight of mybe 50 pounds that I
roughed out a couple months ago (filling 2 40 gallon trash bags with
shavings in the process).

I looked at the bigger and heavier lathes but I had the requirment
that the lathe be semi-portable and I wanted a low RPM for unballanced
chunks. I started out with a grizzly that would bog down at the
slightest touch and start dancing if things were just slightly off
ballence. I love how the DVR puts more power into the motor to
maintain the RPM that you select. One of these days I'm going to
convert my lathe to 220 but I'm not seeing the need at this point.

My DVR sits on a wooden stand made out of 2x4s and 2x6s with wheels at
one end so I can move it out onto the driveway and keep the shavings
out of the garage. This creates a minor problem in that during the
sunny heat of the day the LCD display goes black and hard to read.
However, I generally don't pay too much attention to the RPM. I turn
at the speed I'm comfortable with for the piece I'm turning (if it
seems too fast I slow it down a bit..if it is taking too long I speed
it up..sometimes I turn something slower just because I'm trying to
relax and enjoy the process) Learning on the grizzly I got used to
going slow so I have to keep reminding myself that I have more power
and I can go faster without bogging the lathe down.

Carl McCarty wrote:

I am getting ready to move up to a new lathe. I currently have an old
Delta Homecraft Double Duty lathe.
It works fine but I would like something with more capacity.
I have been looking at the tecknatool site and thinking one of their
lathes would suit my needs well.
I am seeking some advice from more experienced turners than myself if
the DVR motor and different tailstock is realy worth
all that extra money. With the extra $8-900 I could get all the
accessories for the lathe and still have money left over?
I was at Woodcraft the other day, and the salesman was pushing the
DVR pretty hard and acted like the 3000 was a thing of the past. But,
they also had the DVR on the floor and certanly make more money of an
$1800 sale than they do $900.
So, if anyone would share their knowledge and point me in one
direction or another, I would appreciate it. Also, if you know of
another lathe in this price range and have a strong arguement for it,
I would like to hear it.
Thanks,
Carl McCarty





  #5   Report Post  
Old July 12th 04, 02:50 AM
Mike Piechowski
 
Posts: n/a
Default Nova DVR vs. Nova 3000

Carl McCarty wrote:
Thank you for the reply. I believe I will probaly be spending the extra
money on the DVR.

william kossack wrote:

Buying a lathe is like buying a car. It really depends on what you
think your going to do, what your friends have and how much you want
to spend. I know people that have jet minis and are very happy with
them and I know people with some of the big iron lathes and a few that
have DVR. Many turners have more than one lathe. Like a car owner
they have a pickuptruck lathe to rough out and you don't mind abusing
with chunks that are maybe a bit large, another lathe for general use
that you use more and maybe a sportscar lathe that you got because of
your midlife crises required something flashy to impress turners of a
different gender

I've had a DVR for about 4 months and love it. The only problems I've
had with my DVR is getting 5 minutes of time from my teenage son so he
could help me put it on the stand and the problem with a burr
developing in the taper that required the use of a reamer. I've
turned both tiny mini bowls and large bowls with a recent maple chunk
that was 17 inches across and with a weight of mybe 50 pounds that I
roughed out a couple months ago (filling 2 40 gallon trash bags with
shavings in the process).

I looked at the bigger and heavier lathes but I had the requirment
that the lathe be semi-portable and I wanted a low RPM for unballanced
chunks. I started out with a grizzly that would bog down at the
slightest touch and start dancing if things were just slightly off
ballence. I love how the DVR puts more power into the motor to
maintain the RPM that you select. One of these days I'm going to
convert my lathe to 220 but I'm not seeing the need at this point.

My DVR sits on a wooden stand made out of 2x4s and 2x6s with wheels at
one end so I can move it out onto the driveway and keep the shavings
out of the garage. This creates a minor problem in that during the
sunny heat of the day the LCD display goes black and hard to read.
However, I generally don't pay too much attention to the RPM. I turn
at the speed I'm comfortable with for the piece I'm turning (if it
seems too fast I slow it down a bit..if it is taking too long I speed
it up..sometimes I turn something slower just because I'm trying to
relax and enjoy the process) Learning on the grizzly I got used to
going slow so I have to keep reminding myself that I have more power
and I can go faster without bogging the lathe down.

Carl McCarty wrote:

I am getting ready to move up to a new lathe. I currently have an old
Delta Homecraft Double Duty lathe.
It works fine but I would like something with more capacity.
I have been looking at the tecknatool site and thinking one of their
lathes would suit my needs well.
I am seeking some advice from more experienced turners than myself if
the DVR motor and different tailstock is realy worth
all that extra money. With the extra $8-900 I could get all the
accessories for the lathe and still have money left over?
I was at Woodcraft the other day, and the salesman was pushing the
DVR pretty hard and acted like the 3000 was a thing of the past. But,
they also had the DVR on the floor and certanly make more money of an
$1800 sale than they do $900.
So, if anyone would share their knowledge and point me in one
direction or another, I would appreciate it. Also, if you know of
another lathe in this price range and have a strong arguement for it,
I would like to hear it.
Thanks,
Carl McCarty






If you can afford the DVR, buy it.

I've had my DVR for several months as well, I'm still glad I chose it
every time I turn it on. So far it has turned anything I've asked it to
without complaint, from pens to 18" diameter Madrone bowl blanks. I've
switched it over to 220 and I've made a few basic modifications to it,
including an extremely heavy duty stand and a modified outrigger
toolrest that has a post that extends to the floor (if any other DVR
owners want one, drop me a note - lil_mike at earthlink dot net).

To sum up the DVR, it is far far more lathe than I currently warrant as
a turner, that's for sure. Teknatool's support has been top-notch as
well, they helped me through the little difficulties I had when I got
the lathe.

The 2 HP motor with variable speed on the DVR is very nice, as is
reverse. Adding these items would bring the cost of a 3000 to very near
that of the DVR, and though the speed control would start at 0 rpm,
you'd still be dealing with a belt and pulleys.

Mike


  #6   Report Post  
Old July 13th 04, 03:22 AM
Barry N. Turner
 
Posts: n/a
Default Nova DVR vs. Nova 3000

Carl, be sure you add up the cost of all the "parts" on the DVR before you
compare lathe prices. Did you include the stand and/or cast iron legs? Bed
extension? Outboard tool rest?

Barry


"Carl McCarty" wrote in message
...
I am getting ready to move up to a new lathe. I currently have an old
Delta Homecraft Double Duty lathe.
It works fine but I would like something with more capacity.
I have been looking at the tecknatool site and thinking one of their
lathes would suit my needs well.
I am seeking some advice from more experienced turners than myself if
the DVR motor and different tailstock is realy worth
all that extra money. With the extra $8-900 I could get all the
accessories for the lathe and still have money left over?
I was at Woodcraft the other day, and the salesman was pushing the DVR
pretty hard and acted like the 3000 was a thing of the past. But, they
also had the DVR on the floor and certanly make more money of an $1800
sale than they do $900.
So, if anyone would share their knowledge and point me in one direction
or another, I would appreciate it. Also, if you know of
another lathe in this price range and have a strong arguement for it, I
would like to hear it.
Thanks,
Carl McCarty





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