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Old April 15th 19, 10:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On Mon, 15 Apr 2019 21:50:55 +0100, Clive Page wrote:

Wouldn't it be feasible, while works are under way, to install dozens
or even hundreds of small radio-linked battery-operated smoke detectors
all over the structure?


Not sure that would help very much. It's the massive timber roofs
that go up then collapse into the building destroying the
contents(*). Those roofs are really just a tinder dry, dust covered,
open aerial bonfires just waiting to be lit and once lit just burn,
you don't stand a chance of putting it out.

(*) Though looking at the drone image, it looks like the Notra Dam
vaulting hadn't collapsed when that was taken so the fire might not
have got into the body of the cathedral. Several thousands of gallons
of water per minute may well have though. B-(

--
Cheers
Dave.




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Old April 15th 19, 10:56 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Clive Page wrote in
:

On 15/04/2019 19:18, Andy Burns wrote:
Adam, has you apprentice been playing with a blowtorch again?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-47941794


It is a tragedy. But it seems so many historic buildings catch fire
while being renovated. For example in recent years, e.g. Windsor
Castle, York Minster, Glasgow School of Art.

My recommendation: go to see the Palace of Westminster before it too
burns down, as parliamentarians are determined to start a substantial
renovation effort in just a year or two.

It does seem that building contractors can be awfully careless in
these old buildings: all it takes is a blowlamp left too long near to
something flammable, or a multi-way power adaptor just a bit
overloaded. In all these cases it seems that the fire takes hold and
spreads quite widely before anyone notices: after all there must have
been *lots* of people around in the Notre Dame in early evening.
Wouldn't it be feasible, while works are under way, to install dozens
or even hundreds of small radio-linked battery-operated smoke
detectors all over the structure?



I totally agree. Would the Fire Dept be consulted on a risk assessment?
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Old April 15th 19, 11:40 PM posted to uk.d-i-y
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In article , Andy Burns
scribeth thus
ARW wrote:

On 15/04/2019 19:42, Harry Bloomfield wrote:
Harry Bloomfield expressed precisely :
Live camera -
https://www.rt.com/news/456618-watch...fs-notre-dame/

Looks as if the centre tower and much of the roof has collapsed.

Scaffolding looks near collapse..


Yep.


insides of the square stone tower(s) now well alight


No their not so the chief of the fire dept sez..
--
Tony Sayer


Man is least himself when he talks in his own person.

Give him a keyboard, and he will reveal himself.


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Old April 16th 19, 12:56 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On Monday, 15 April 2019 21:51:00 UTC+1, Clive Page wrote:
On 15/04/2019 19:18, Andy Burns wrote:


Adam, has you apprentice been playing with a blowtorch again?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-47941794


It is a tragedy. But it seems so many historic buildings catch fire while being renovated. For example in recent years, e.g. Windsor Castle, York Minster, Glasgow School of Art.

My recommendation: go to see the Palace of Westminster before it too burns down, as parliamentarians are determined to start a substantial renovation effort in just a year or two.

It does seem that building contractors can be awfully careless in these old buildings: all it takes is a blowlamp left too long near to something flammable, or a multi-way power adaptor just a bit overloaded. In all these cases it seems that the fire takes hold and spreads quite widely before anyone notices: after all there must have been *lots* of people around in the Notre Dame in early evening. Wouldn't it be feasible, while works are under way, to install dozens or even hundreds of small radio-linked battery-operated smoke detectors all over the structure?


I think the reality too often is people that truly don't give a toss. Add folk that have no clue what they're doing & people still drunk or stoned and no surprise things go wrong. I had to take a blowlamp off someone not too long ago. What he was doing with it was a disaster. It's hard to mandate care.


NT
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Old April 16th 19, 12:57 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On Tuesday, 16 April 2019 00:56:23 UTC+1, tabby wrote:
On Monday, 15 April 2019 21:51:00 UTC+1, Clive Page wrote:
On 15/04/2019 19:18, Andy Burns wrote:


Adam, has you apprentice been playing with a blowtorch again?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-47941794


It is a tragedy. But it seems so many historic buildings catch fire while being renovated. For example in recent years, e.g. Windsor Castle, York Minster, Glasgow School of Art.

My recommendation: go to see the Palace of Westminster before it too burns down, as parliamentarians are determined to start a substantial renovation effort in just a year or two.

It does seem that building contractors can be awfully careless in these old buildings: all it takes is a blowlamp left too long near to something flammable, or a multi-way power adaptor just a bit overloaded. In all these cases it seems that the fire takes hold and spreads quite widely before anyone notices: after all there must have been *lots* of people around in the Notre Dame in early evening. Wouldn't it be feasible, while works are under way, to install dozens or even hundreds of small radio-linked battery-operated smoke detectors all over the structure?


I think the reality too often is people that truly don't give a toss. Add folk that have no clue what they're doing & people still drunk or stoned and no surprise things go wrong. I had to take a blowlamp off someone not too long ago. What he was doing with it was a disaster. It's hard to mandate care.


NT


Make the people involved financially responsible and partial improvement would occur.


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Old April 16th 19, 06:04 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On 15/04/2019 20:54, Brian Reay wrote:
On 15/04/2019 19:18, Andy Burns wrote:
Adam, has you apprentice been playing with a blowtorch again?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-47941794


A tragedy.


An opportunity for some nice affordable housing projects.


Whenever we visit Paris (it is normally part of or annual Tour de
France), we make a point of having a picnic by the Seine overlooking
Notre Dame.


The picnic spot will still be there.
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Old April 16th 19, 06:53 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On Monday, 15 April 2019 20:48:58 UTC+1, Vir Campestris wrote:
On 15/04/2019 19:18, Andy Burns wrote:
Adam, has you apprentice been playing with a blowtorch again?


**** isn't it.

They commented on the Beeb earlier that when the Nazis were thrown out
the local Kommandant was ordered to destroy it.

He didn't obey the order.

Now some twit with a Gaulois takes it out. Or something else equally stupid.



ISIS?
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Old April 16th 19, 06:56 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On Tuesday, 16 April 2019 00:57:40 UTC+1, wrote:
On Tuesday, 16 April 2019 00:56:23 UTC+1, tabby wrote:
On Monday, 15 April 2019 21:51:00 UTC+1, Clive Page wrote:
On 15/04/2019 19:18, Andy Burns wrote:


Adam, has you apprentice been playing with a blowtorch again?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-47941794

It is a tragedy. But it seems so many historic buildings catch fire while being renovated. For example in recent years, e.g. Windsor Castle, York Minster, Glasgow School of Art.

My recommendation: go to see the Palace of Westminster before it too burns down, as parliamentarians are determined to start a substantial renovation effort in just a year or two.

It does seem that building contractors can be awfully careless in these old buildings: all it takes is a blowlamp left too long near to something flammable, or a multi-way power adaptor just a bit overloaded. In all these cases it seems that the fire takes hold and spreads quite widely before anyone notices: after all there must have been *lots* of people around in the Notre Dame in early evening. Wouldn't it be feasible, while works are under way, to install dozens or even hundreds of small radio-linked battery-operated smoke detectors all over the structure?


I think the reality too often is people that truly don't give a toss. Add folk that have no clue what they're doing & people still drunk or stoned and no surprise things go wrong. I had to take a blowlamp off someone not too long ago. What he was doing with it was a disaster. It's hard to mandate care.


NT


Make the people involved financially responsible and partial improvement would occur.


They will likely have insurance.
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Old April 16th 19, 07:51 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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On Tuesday, 16 April 2019 06:56:04 UTC+1, harry wrote:
On Tuesday, 16 April 2019 00:57:40 UTC+1, tabby wrote:
On Tuesday, 16 April 2019 00:56:23 UTC+1, tabby wrote:
On Monday, 15 April 2019 21:51:00 UTC+1, Clive Page wrote:
On 15/04/2019 19:18, Andy Burns wrote:

Adam, has you apprentice been playing with a blowtorch again?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-47941794

It is a tragedy. But it seems so many historic buildings catch fire while being renovated. For example in recent years, e.g. Windsor Castle, York Minster, Glasgow School of Art.

My recommendation: go to see the Palace of Westminster before it too burns down, as parliamentarians are determined to start a substantial renovation effort in just a year or two.

It does seem that building contractors can be awfully careless in these old buildings: all it takes is a blowlamp left too long near to something flammable, or a multi-way power adaptor just a bit overloaded. In all these cases it seems that the fire takes hold and spreads quite widely before anyone notices: after all there must have been *lots* of people around in the Notre Dame in early evening. Wouldn't it be feasible, while works are under way, to install dozens or even hundreds of small radio-linked battery-operated smoke detectors all over the structure?

I think the reality too often is people that truly don't give a toss. Add folk that have no clue what they're doing & people still drunk or stoned and no surprise things go wrong. I had to take a blowlamp off someone not too long ago. What he was doing with it was a disaster. It's hard to mandate care.


NT


Make the people involved financially responsible and partial improvement would occur.


They will likely have insurance.


Captain Obvious strikes again.
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Old April 16th 19, 08:14 AM posted to uk.d-i-y
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Marland wrote:
[snip]
could have been,that isn’t practical with large buildings but one thing
that used to and may still take place when ships were worked on in
shipyards and drydocks was when hot work such as welding,cutting etc takes
place you normally have a person present whose job it is to watch out for
fire caused by sparks or heat conduction and make sure the area is safe
before it is left and that person isn’t the same one as the one(s) doing
the work.


It was certainly expected even on our little 10.5 metre steel boat
when there was welding being done. It saved the boat from a serious
fire too as I was inside keeping watch while they were welding plates
outside and caught a fire before it got too serious, was still a bit
too exciting for my liking though. I got out sharpish and said there
was a fire, there were three or four hefty lads with breathing
apparatus on inside the boat very quickly!

--
Chris Green
·


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