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I'm a clever rabbit!


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On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Well done!

I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!

Are *all* GCSE questions multiple choice these days? If so, that's not a
proper test of *real* knowledge since it's easy to know enough to be
able to pick the most likely answer without having a clue if no answers
were provided.

Wasn't like that in my day!
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On Thursday, 25 August 2016 08:09:28 UTC+1, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


I got 3/7 but I couldn't be bothered at this time in the morning to actually think about the answers.

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"Roger Mills" wrote in message
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On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Well done!

I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!


I got 6/7 because I know nothing about Greek and Latin literature (the
language (*) and the culture bores me rigid) so I had to guess about the
queen in the Aeniad. That was one of those "you either know it or you don't"
questions, whereas all/of the others could be worked out by applying a
little knowledge and extending it or by using a technique that you have
learned rather that dredging up a fact that you have learned.

The French one was sneaky because the correct answer was inferred from what
was said whereas one of the incorrect ones was more or less an exact
translation of part of the French wording but with the crucial word
("reduce" instead of "increase") changed to reverse the sense.


(*) I think one of the main reasons that I found Latin so hard was because I
couldn't distinguish nouns from adjectives from verbs in Latin. And that's
because Latin has no redundancy - no little helper words like articles (the,
a), no pronouns (he, they) and no defined word order. And in the languages
I've learned (French and German) you rely on these - anything followed by a
pronoun or person's name is likely to be a verb; anything immediately before
or after a noun is going to be the adjective that's associated with it;
anything following an article is a noun (and German even helpfully
capitalises these!). And you usually get all the words for one clause next
to each other, whereas I remember my Latin teacher going into raptures about
some weird "chi-rhoic form" in which the words from one clause are
deliberately mixed up with those from another (so "the red cat sat on the
blue mat" might put "blue" next to "cat" and "red" next to "mat", with only
the adjectival agreement - assuming it's not ambiguous - allowing you to
untangle the sentence.

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In message , Roger Mills
writes
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Well done!

I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!


Ah! I cheated on the binary number. Had to be even and there was only
the one:-)

Are *all* GCSE questions multiple choice these days? If so, that's not
a proper test of *real* knowledge since it's easy to know enough to be
able to pick the most likely answer without having a clue if no answers
were provided.


Agreed.

Wasn't like that in my day!


Nor mine. My wife needed *O* level maths as a mature student. Looking
over her shoulder, I found some of that very difficult.

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On 25/08/2016 09:57, Tim Lamb wrote:

Ah! I cheated on the binary number. Had to be even and there was only
the one:-)


That's not cheating. That's understanding binary.

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On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:

I'm a clever rabbit!


That's two of us then.

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On Thursday, August 25, 2016 at 10:49:59 AM UTC+1, F wrote:
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:

I'm a clever rabbit!


That's two of us then.


Three.

I did guess at the Greek question, although I then recalled the opera named after the two main characters.
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On 25/08/2016 10:46, F wrote:
On 25/08/2016 09:57, Tim Lamb wrote:

Ah! I cheated on the binary number. Had to be even and there was only
the one:-)


That's not cheating. That's understanding binary.

There are 10 types of people...

Cheers
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Roger Mills Wrote in message:
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Well done!

I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!

Are *all* GCSE questions multiple choice these days? If so, that's not a
proper test of *real* knowledge since it's easy to know enough to be
able to pick the most likely answer without having a clue if no answers
were provided.


No, most aren't multiple choice.

Most subjects probably don't have them at all. I think DD1 only
really had them in science and maybe geography. Even then they
are only part of the total mark (about 25% I think).

SWMBO had some in her med school exams, but they were negatively
marked, (you lost marks for wrong answers)



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On 25/08/16 10:49, F wrote:
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:

I'm a clever rabbit!


That's two of us then.

Just got enzyme wrong.

:-0

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On 25/08/16 10:59, Halmyre wrote:
On Thursday, August 25, 2016 at 10:49:59 AM UTC+1, F wrote:
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:

I'm a clever rabbit!


That's two of us then.


Three.

I did guess at the Greek question, although I then recalled the opera named after the two main characters.

I guessed it but vaguely remembered having read the Aeneid years ago and
that name sounded familiar


--
How fortunate for governments that the people they administer don't think.

Adolf Hitler

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On Thursday, 25 August 2016 11:20:05 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
Just got enzyme wrong.


I can still remember "An enzyme is an organic catalyst..." but I don't remember the rest of the essay (which was learned by rote for later reproduction in the exam).

Owain
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On Thursday, 25 August 2016 08:09:28 UTC+1, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


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But of which gender.
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"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Well done!

I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!


Didn't have Scooby about the classics question

Had never even heard of the three queens I was supposed to choose from
(except in the sense of other people with the same name).

My knowledge of the subject was such that if you'd asked me if they were all
real classical queens I still wouldn't have a clue.

(and FWIW I consider my knowledge of ancient history to be above average for
the population)

Do they really do this as a standard subject at school? Or is is just
something that the smart arse Humanities biased students do, just like, as a
smart arsed science student, I did AddMaths - and the token maths question
in the test was trivial by comparison, I'd expect a 12 year old to get it
right.

tim







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Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the thought at
age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.

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On Thursday, 25 August 2016 14:47:34 UTC+1, tim... wrote:
"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Well done!

I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!


Didn't have Scooby about the classics question

Had never even heard of the three queens I was supposed to choose from
(except in the sense of other people with the same name).

My knowledge of the subject was such that if you'd asked me if they were all
real classical queens I still wouldn't have a clue.

(and FWIW I consider my knowledge of ancient history to be above average for
the population)

Do they really do this as a standard subject at school? Or is is just
something that the smart arse Humanities biased students do, just like, as a
smart arsed science student, I did AddMaths - and the token maths question
in the test was trivial by comparison, I'd expect a 12 year old to get it
right.

tim


But how can yuo tell a male rabbit from a female one ?
What if one believes it's in the wrong body ?

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"tim..." Wrote in message:

"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Well done!

I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!


Didn't have Scooby about the classics question

Had never even heard of the three queens I was supposed to choose from
(except in the sense of other people with the same name).

My knowledge of the subject was such that if you'd asked me if they were all
real classical queens I still wouldn't have a clue.

(and FWIW I consider my knowledge of ancient history to be above average for
the population)

Do they really do this as a standard subject at school? Or is is just
something that the smart arse Humanities biased students do, just like, as a
smart arsed science student, I did AddMaths - and the token maths question
in the test was trivial by comparison, I'd expect a 12 year old to get it
right.


No Classical Civilisation isn't a standard subject, though I'm
sure some schools will offer it, more likely private schools I'd
imagine. Bit of an odd question to put in there really.


As it happens I read the Aenid last year, so happened to know the
answer. DD1 did Classical Civ GCSE last year (homs educated, so
not at school) and I read it with her.

Though, having done most of her GCSE's and being too young for
sixth form yet, she is probably goign to do Further Maths or
something next year. Does that just make her a general smart
arse:-)
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On 2016-08-25, Jethro_uk wrote:
On Thu, 25 Aug 2016 02:59:15 -0700, Halmyre wrote:
On Thursday, August 25, 2016 at 10:49:59 AM UTC+1, F wrote:
On 25/08/2016 08:09, Tim Lamb wrote:

I'm a clever rabbit!

That's two of us then.

Three.

I did guess at the Greek question, although I then recalled the opera
named after the two main characters.


But the Aenied is written in Latin ... it's a *Roman* classic ...


But the question is about an English translation, and includes the words
"We are the few left alive by the Greeks". If you aren't familiar with Virgil
and are trying to work out what it's about just from the question, that it's
about Greek history/legends/mythology isn't unreasonable.
(It's a Roman classic about a time hundreds of years before Rome was founded.)
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In article , Dan S. MacAbre
scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the thought at
age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


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On Thu, 25 Aug 2016 10:59:52 +0100, Syd Rumpo wrote:

On 25/08/2016 10:46, F wrote:
On 25/08/2016 09:57, Tim Lamb wrote:

Ah! I cheated on the binary number. Had to be even and there was only
the one:-)


That's not cheating. That's understanding binary.

There are 10 types of people...


Only 25% (1 in 100) have heard of binary.


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"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Dan S. MacAbre
scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the thought at
age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


--
Tony Sayer

So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard of, and
guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad description that should
never have been required to be learnt and regurgitated.
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On 25/08/2016 09:25, Roger Mills wrote:
I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!


I understood the French one perfectly. Then debated which wrong answer
to pick. _None_ of them matched the French properly.

They weren't that hard really.

Andy
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In message , Vir
Campestris writes
On 25/08/2016 09:25, Roger Mills wrote:
I got 6/7 - having misunderstood the French question!


I understood the French one perfectly. Then debated which wrong answer
to pick. _None_ of them matched the French properly.

They weren't that hard really.


Clearly aimed at Rabbits:-)

Presumably a sight challenged person suffering from St. Vitus Dance
could have got 33.33r?

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On 27/08/2016 08:50, Tim Lamb wrote:
Presumably a sight challenged person suffering from St. Vitus Dance
could have got 33.33r?


Out of 7?


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In message , Vir
Campestris writes
On 27/08/2016 08:50, Tim Lamb wrote:
Presumably a sight challenged person suffering from St. Vitus Dance
could have got 33.33r?


Out of 7?


I forgot the % sign:-)

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In article ,
Vir Campestris wrote:
On 27/08/2016 08:50, Tim Lamb wrote:
Presumably a sight challenged person suffering from St. Vitus Dance
could have got 33.33r?


Out of 7?


when I took one of my A-Level maths papers (nearly 60 years ago), I got 252
out of 250 - a classmate got 254! (he became a judge)

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"Tim Lamb" wrote in message
...
In message , Vir
Campestris writes
On 27/08/2016 08:50, Tim Lamb wrote:
Presumably a sight challenged person suffering from St. Vitus Dance
could have got 33.33r?


Out of 7?


I forgot the % sign:-)


I frequent do these silly newspaper quizzes where I have no idea of the
answer

I often get 1 or 2 out of 10 :-)

Obviously I am an unlucky person

tim



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On 27/08/2016 18:11, Tim Lamb wrote:
In message , Vir
Campestris writes
On 27/08/2016 08:50, Tim Lamb wrote:
Presumably a sight challenged person suffering from St. Vitus Dance
could have got 33.33r?


Out of 7?


I forgot the % sign:-)

I worked that out.

2/7 is 28.571428 (recurring)
3/7 is 42.85714

if my mental arithmetic is correct. :P

Andy
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In message , Vir
Campestris writes
On 27/08/2016 18:11, Tim Lamb wrote:
In message , Vir
Campestris writes
On 27/08/2016 08:50, Tim Lamb wrote:
Presumably a sight challenged person suffering from St. Vitus Dance
could have got 33.33r?

Out of 7?


I forgot the % sign:-)

I worked that out.

2/7 is 28.571428 (recurring)
3/7 is 42.85714

if my mental arithmetic is correct. :P


Undoubtedly. I was thinking tick box choice of 3 giving 1/3rd marks in
an exam.

I actually got a 3 at *O* level maths! Much to the surprise of Jonnie
Roscoe who had my name on his tombstone list:-)

Andy


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On Friday, August 26, 2016 at 2:37:07 PM UTC+1, Dave W wrote:
"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Dan S. MacAbre
scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the thought at
age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


--
Tony Sayer

So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard of, and
guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad description that should
never have been required to be learnt and regurgitated.



Yes, I've never heard the expression either.
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Halmyre wrote:

Dave W wrote:

guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad description


Yes, I've never heard the expression either.


See also: Dormitory village.

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In article , Halmyre
wrote:
On Friday, August 26, 2016 at 2:37:07 PM UTC+1, Dave W wrote:
"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Dan S. MacAbre
scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the thought
at age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


-- Tony Sayer

So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard of,
and guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad description
that should never have been required to be learnt and regurgitated.



Yes, I've never heard the expression either.


perhaps you have to live in one (or near one) to know the expression

--
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"charles" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Halmyre
wrote:
On Friday, August 26, 2016 at 2:37:07 PM UTC+1, Dave W wrote:
"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Dan S. MacAbre
scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the thought
at age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


-- Tony Sayer

So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard of,
and guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad description
that should never have been required to be learnt and regurgitated.



Yes, I've never heard the expression either.


perhaps you have to live in one (or near one) to know the expression


I've heard the term "dormitory village" for years: I'm sure I learned in in
O Level Geography in the late 70s. And although I'd not heard of "commuter
village" before, its meaning is very obviously a synonym for dormitory
village. That was one of the easier questions and came into the category of
"you can work it out from common sense and prior knowledge", as you can with
most of them except the Dido one which is "you either know this fact or you
don't, but you can't work it out".

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On 29/08/16 10:51, NY wrote:
"charles" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Halmyre
wrote:
On Friday, August 26, 2016 at 2:37:07 PM UTC+1, Dave W wrote:
"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Dan S. MacAbre
scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the thought
at age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


-- Tony Sayer

So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard
of,
and guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad description
that should never have been required to be learnt and regurgitated.



Yes, I've never heard the expression either.


perhaps you have to live in one (or near one) to know the expression


I've heard the term "dormitory village" for years: I'm sure I learned in
in O Level Geography in the late 70s. And although I'd not heard of
"commuter village" before, its meaning is very obviously a synonym for
dormitory village. That was one of the easier questions and came into
the category of "you can work it out from common sense and prior
knowledge", as you can with most of them except the Dido one which is
"you either know this fact or you don't, but you can't work it out".


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dido_and_Aeneas

Which its hard not to have heard of at least once in your life.


I think the enzyme one was 'you either know it or you don't'



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"The Natural Philosopher" wrote in message
...
So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard
of,


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dido_and_Aeneas

Which its hard not to have heard of at least once in your life.


I've evidently managed to get to age 53 without ever having heard of it.

I think the enzyme one was 'you either know it or you don't'


Agreed - that's another 'you either know it or you don't'. I'd encountered
the term in O level (and A level) Chemistry. If I'd done Biology I've have
been even more likely to encounter it. I also knew because my dad worked as
a research pharmacist so I heard quite a lot of medical terminology even
before I started Chemistry at secondary school; not everyone would have that
extra advantage!

The binary one was an interesting example of my not spotting the easy
short-cut - that only one of the answers was even and the other two were odd
(or was it the other way round?). Instead I did it the long way round: write
down the headings 128, 64, ..., 2, 1 and add up all the headings where there
was a 1. Sometimes in multiple choice they make it too easy by having only
one plausible answer instead of at least two to make it less trivial and
require you to work out the distinction.

The French one was cunning in that one of the answers was almost
word-for-word translation of the French (so making it look plausible) except
that the sense was diametrically opposite. Nice one!

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On 29/08/16 13:29, NY wrote:
"The Natural Philosopher" wrote in message
...
So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard
of,


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dido_and_Aeneas

Which its hard not to have heard of at least once in your life.


I've evidently managed to get to age 53 without ever having heard of it.

I think the enzyme one was 'you either know it or you don't'


Agreed - that's another 'you either know it or you don't'. I'd
encountered the term in O level (and A level) Chemistry. If I'd done
Biology I've have been even more likely to encounter it. I also knew
because my dad worked as a research pharmacist so I heard quite a lot of
medical terminology even before I started Chemistry at secondary school;
not everyone would have that extra advantage!

The binary one was an interesting example of my not spotting the easy
short-cut - that only one of the answers was even and the other two were
odd (or was it the other way round?). Instead I did it the long way
round: write down the headings 128, 64, ..., 2, 1 and add up all the
headings where there was a 1. Sometimes in multiple choice they make it
too easy by having only one plausible answer instead of at least two to
make it less trivial and require you to work out the distinction.

The French one was cunning in that one of the answers was almost
word-for-word translation of the French (so making it look plausible)
except that the sense was diametrically opposite. Nice one!


that was crappy.

Because the 'correct' answer was nothing like the French original.



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The biggest threat to humanity comes from socialism, which has utterly
diverted our attention away from what really matters to our existential
survival, to indulging in navel gazing and faux moral investigations
into what the world ought to be, whilst we fail utterly to deal with
what it actually is.

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Default BBC GCSE quiz


"The Natural Philosopher" wrote in message
...
On 29/08/16 10:51, NY wrote:
"charles" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Halmyre
wrote:
On Friday, August 26, 2016 at 2:37:07 PM UTC+1, Dave W wrote:
"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Dan S. MacAbre

scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read The
Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the
thought
at age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


-- Tony Sayer

So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard
of,
and guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad description
that should never have been required to be learnt and regurgitated.


Yes, I've never heard the expression either.

perhaps you have to live in one (or near one) to know the expression


I've heard the term "dormitory village" for years: I'm sure I learned in
in O Level Geography in the late 70s. And although I'd not heard of
"commuter village" before, its meaning is very obviously a synonym for
dormitory village. That was one of the easier questions and came into
the category of "you can work it out from common sense and prior
knowledge", as you can with most of them except the Dido one which is
"you either know this fact or you don't, but you can't work it out".


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dido_and_Aeneas

Which its hard not to have heard of at least once in your life.


you are right

I have heard of it now because of that question

but until then I have never

and why should I?

tim



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"NY" wrote in message
o.uk...
"The Natural Philosopher" wrote in message
...
So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd heard
of,


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dido_and_Aeneas

Which its hard not to have heard of at least once in your life.


I've evidently managed to get to age 53 without ever having heard of it.

I think the enzyme one was 'you either know it or you don't'


Agreed - that's another 'you either know it or you don't'.


I managed to work it out from my cursory knowledge of science

I certainly didn't get told the answer whilst at school


The French one was cunning in that one of the answers was almost
word-for-word translation of the French (so making it look plausible)
except that the sense was diametrically opposite. Nice one!


I worked that out from my pigeon French as well.

I couldn't actually work out what the question and answer were, I just
managed to get the sense of direction of the question and picked the one
answer that was heading the same way.

tim



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On Mon, 29 Aug 2016 18:58:28 +0100, tim... wrote:

"The Natural Philosopher" wrote in message
...
On 29/08/16 10:51, NY wrote:
"charles" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Halmyre wrote:
On Friday, August 26, 2016 at 2:37:07 PM UTC+1, Dave W wrote:
"tony sayer" wrote in message
...
In article , Dan S. MacAbre

scribeth thus
Tim Lamb wrote:
I'm a clever rabbit!


Me too, but I wouldn't have done so well at school age. I read
The Aeneid in my early twenties, but would have shuddered at the
thought at age 16 :-) I guessed the one about the village.


Managed 7/7 which is err, rather surprising;!...


-- Tony Sayer

So did I, but I chose Dido for The Aeneid as the only one I'd
heard
of,
and guessed "Commuter village" as being some current fad
description that should never have been required to be learnt and
regurgitated.


Yes, I've never heard the expression either.

perhaps you have to live in one (or near one) to know the expression

I've heard the term "dormitory village" for years: I'm sure I learned
in in O Level Geography in the late 70s. And although I'd not heard of
"commuter village" before, its meaning is very obviously a synonym for
dormitory village. That was one of the easier questions and came into
the category of "you can work it out from common sense and prior
knowledge", as you can with most of them except the Dido one which is
"you either know this fact or you don't, but you can't work it out".


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dido_and_Aeneas

Which its hard not to have heard of at least once in your life.


you are right

I have heard of it now because of that question

but until then I have never

and why should I?


Just shows you that even the soap powder adverts have suffered from "The
Dumbing Down" effect. I think a surprisingly large number of the older UK
TV viewing populous may have been able to correctly guess the answer to
question 1 from the free biochemistry lesson that used to be part of the
earlier Bio-soap powder adverts. :-)

--
Johnny B Good
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